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Tropical connection NYC forum area Sun-Wed, 8/2-5/20- Tropical Storm Isaias

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19 minutes ago, donsutherland1 said:

Some wind gusts from Sandy:

East Moriches: 82 mph
Farmingdale: 90 mph
Great Gull Island: 85 mph
Jones Beach: 81 mph
Long Beach: 83 mph
New York City-JFK: 85 mph
Syosset: 82 mph

Winds here were definitely stronger from Sandy. This reminds me more of the 3/2010 nor’easter and Irene wind wise. The fast NNE motion at our latitude helped strengthen the winds I’m sure as well as the warm waters for this time of year. 

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Our footage of a large waterspout turned tornado in Cape May County on Tuesday. It was just rated an EF1 but when we saw it as it’s biggest point I think it was stronger than that however it was over marsh land mostly (thankfully) so hard to gauge. Also footage of damage around Bay Ridge Brooklyn from the wind. 

https://youtu.be/FkrDyQjjmKE

AE8BB7C5-541B-47C1-BA78-1AF94F083AE1.png

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Feel confident that Highland Lakes on the ridge line has an extreme burst of mixing that hit 1/3 mile area by 3 miles.

my yard got thrashed with stuff..crows fly lots more.

photos to follow 

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3 hours ago, donsutherland1 said:

Some wind gusts from Sandy:

East Moriches: 82 mph
Farmingdale: 90 mph
Great Gull Island: 85 mph
Jones Beach: 81 mph
Long Beach: 83 mph
New York City-JFK: 85 mph
Syosset: 82 mph

I had a 52mph in this storm and a 79 mph. In Sandy. I had 56 mph. In Irene. I had no anemometer during Gloria but the wind damage was similar to Sandy.

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I want to close with a few pieces of information, including graphics for Isaias-tropical connection. 

Borrowed this written piece from Ramblin Red post on tropical forum: 

Good article on the effects of the storm from the Wash Post. 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2020/08/05/isaias-power-outages/?hpid=hp_national1-8-12_cwgisaias-3pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory-ans

78 mph: The wind gust clocked one mile southwest of Battery Park City in Manhattan and in Farmingdale, on Long Island. Numerous gusts reached around 70 mph in the New York City boroughs, including at JFK and La Guardia airports, both located in Queens.

Oak Island, N.C.: 87 mph

Cape May, N.J.: 75 mph

 

Ocean City, Md.: 74 mph

McClellanville, S.C.: 78 mph

Dewey Beach, Del.: 68 mph

Assateague, Va.: 68 mph

Wallops Island, Va.: 68 mph

Atlantic City, N.J.: 66 mph

Norfolk: 61 mph

Virginia Beach: 59 mph

Richmond: 51 mph

146 mph: The wind gust measured at the top of Mount Washington, N.H., the highest on record there in the month of August.

115: The number of tornado warnings the National Weather Service issued over the storm’s duration.

33: The number of tornado reports associated with Isaias that the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center received Monday and Tuesday. 

Nine inches: The rainfall in Sotterley, Md., in St. Mary’s County, less than 60 miles southeast of Washington. Widespread rainfall totals along Isaias’s path reached three to six inches, with localized amounts between six and nine inches. Some of the heaviest rain fell from eastern Virginia through Washington’s eastern suburbs in Maryland into eastern Pennsylvania and southern New York.

-------------

First image: Leftover power outages 48 hours after Isaias passed.  Rainfall, departure from norm and percent departure from normal Aug 1-5 (ending 12z/5).  Guidance was on the right track...just a bit too far east of the reality.  No classic PRE occurred because no surface high north of us and not enough separation between the hybrid PRE late Monday-early Tuesday and Isaias. Finally, a little more detail in the last image with the NWS MARFC radar-platform integration of rainfall (7- near 10" in brown)   Not much more I can add. I think  70 MPH gust event was pretty good  for our coastal areas and that the HRRRX wind gust predictor while maybe 10 kt high at 24 hours was very accurate within 12 hours. 829P/6

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Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.34.28 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.35.05 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-05 at 8.52.53 PM.png

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4 hours ago, nycwinter said:

it was no question stronger then irene never once did i get the feeling my window might break with irene..

I had 6 inches of rain  wirh winds 40-50 with irene.  Irene is ranked number 2 .

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4 hours ago, donsutherland1 said:

Some wind gusts from Sandy:

East Moriches: 82 mph
Farmingdale: 90 mph
Great Gull Island: 85 mph
Jones Beach: 81 mph
Long Beach: 83 mph
New York City-JFK: 85 mph
Syosset: 82 mph

I think Islip had 90 mph as well. I personally recorded a gust of over 80 mph in Brooklyn during Sandy, my highest ever. Between the wind and extreme storm surge, it'll take a LOT to top Sandy IMO. 

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10 hours ago, justinj said:

Where are you in holbrook?

Just off of exit 61 on the LIE..

now they're saying Saturday at best for power... we didn't have this long of an outage from Sandy...:angry:

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37 minutes ago, mob1 said:

I think Islip had 90 mph as well. I personally recorded a gust of over 80 mph in Brooklyn during Sandy, my highest ever. Between the wind and extreme storm surge, it'll take a LOT to top Sandy IMO. 

Yes, ISP has a 90 mph gust. My initial numbers were from the National Hurricane Center’s report. Below is the PNS:
 

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW YORK NY
854 AM EDT TUE OCT 30 2012


THE FOLLOWING ARE UNOFFICIAL OBSERVATIONS TAKEN DURING THE RECENT
STORM THAT HAS BEEN AFFECTING OUR REGION. APPRECIATION IS EXTENDED TO
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENTS...COOPERATIVE OBSERVERS...SKYWARN SPOTTERS AND
MEDIA FOR THESE REPORTS. THIS SUMMARY IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON OUR HOME
PAGE AT WEATHER.GOV/NYC


***********************PEAK WIND GUST***********************
LOCATION            MAX WIND     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS 
                      GUST          OF    
                      MPH      MEASUREMENT

CONNECTICUT...
ANZ330...
2 S GROTON              76   300 PM 10/29  MESONET 

...FAIRFIELD COUNTY...
BRIDGEPORT AIRPORT      76   549 PM 10/29  ASOS 
GREENWICH               70   520 PM 10/29  TRAINED SPOTTER 
NORWALK                 69   830 PM 10/29  PUBLIC 
TRUMBULL                68   540 PM 10/29  TRAINED SPOTTER 
DANBURY AIRPORT         68   711 PM 10/29  ASOS

...MIDDLESEX COUNTY...
3 SW MIDDLETOWN         58   643 PM 10/29  MESONET

...NEW HAVEN COUNTY...
MADISON                 85   520 PM 10/29  PUBLIC 

...NEW LONDON COUNTY...
GROTON AIRPORT          75   335 PM 10/29  ASOS 
STONINGTON              70   300 PM 10/29  EMERGENCY MNGR

NEW JERSEY
...BERGEN COUNTY...
1 SSE TEANECK           76   731 PM 10/29  MESONET 
TETERBORO               72   747 PM 10/29  ASOS 
NORTH ARLINGTON         63   348 PM 10/29  SKYWARN SPOTTER 

...ESSEX COUNTY...
NEWARK AIRPORT          78   751 PM 10/29  ASOS 
FAIRFIELD               72   741 PM 10/29  MESONET 
1 ESE FAIRFIELD         72   741 PM 10/29  MESONET 
CALDWELL AIRPORT        70   614 PM 10/29  ASOS 

...HUDSON COUNTY...
1 ENE BAYONNE           77   805 PM 10/29  MESONET 
HARRISON                68   720 PM 10/29  CO-OP OBSERVER 

...PASSAIC COUNTY...
CLIFTON                 80   930 PM 10/29  SKYWARN SPOTTER 

NEW YORK 
...ANZ338...
2 N TOMPKINSVILLE       90   824 PM 10/29  MESONET 

...ANZ355...
BUOY 44065              69   514 PM 10/29  NY HARBOR APPROACH BUOY 

...ANZ370...
BUOY 44025              74   250 PM 10/29  BUOY 

...KINGS COUNTY...
CONEY ISLAND            69   642 PM 10/29  MESONET 
FLATBUSH                58   905 PM 10/29  MESONET 

...NASSAU COUNTY...
SYOSSET                 82   703 PM 10/29  SKYWARN SPOTTER 
1 E POINT LOOKOUT       80   750 PM 10/29  JONES BEACH COAST GUARD 
3 E LIDO BEACH          79   615 PM 10/29  MESONET 
BAYVILLE                77   521 PM 10/29  MESONET 
2 NNE GLEN COVE         77   521 PM 10/29  MESONET 
OYSTER BAY              67   338 PM 10/29  SKYWARN SPOTTER 

...NEW YORK COUNTY...
CENTRAL PARK            62   313 PM 10/29  ASOS 

...ORANGE COUNTY...
ORANGE LAKE             61   745 PM 10/29  MESONET 
MONTGOMERY              58   740 PM 10/29  ASOS 

...QUEENS COUNTY...
2 SSE JACKSON HEIGHT    79   802 PM 10/29  MESONET 
NYC/JFK AIRPORT         85   802 PM 10/29  ASOS (direction 100 degrees)
BREEZY POINT            78   830 PM 10/29  MESONET 
NYC/LA GUARDIA          74   655 PM 10/29  ASOS 

..SUFFOLK COUNTY...
EATONS NECK             96   655 PM 10/29  MESONET-ELEVATED 71FT (Est 87 mph at 10m)
ISLIP AIRPORT           90   626 PM 10/29  ASOS - 78KT
4 ENE PLUM ISLAND       85   435 PM 10/29  MESONET 
EAST MORICHES           81   600 PM 10/29  MESONET 
EAST FARMINGDALE        79   723 PM 10/29  ASOS 
UPTON                   79   150 PM 10/29  MESONET 
PATCHOGUE               77   701 PM 10/29  SPOTTER 
FIRE ISLAND             75   435 PM 10/29  MESONET 
POINT O'WOODS           73   350 PM 10/29  MESONET 
1 ENE MONTAUK HIGHWAY   73   220 PM 10/29  MESONET 
2 WSW FISHERS ISLAND    71   300 PM 10/29  MESONET 
1 S BLUE POINT          70   608 PM 10/29  MESONET 
OCEAN BEACH             68   715 PM 10/29  MESONET 
1 NW EAST HAMPTON       66   355 PM 10/29  MESONET

...WESTCHESTER COUNTY...
WHITE PLAINS            72   705 PM 10/29  ASOS 

$$

DS 
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I think what made Isaias so bad was the consistent strong gusts for a few hours. I had numerous gusts close to 50 for a prolonged period. I saw that Freeport long Island had a sustained wind of 44mph. That is pretty impressive for a sustained.

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On 8/5/2020 at 8:05 PM, Animal said:

Still around 800 meters no power in highland lakes .

Apparently crews from Pennsylvania are on site. Recording indicated hit hard with numerous telephone poles and trees down. Rt 515 still closed. Lots of tree damage.

 

It’s actually rough up here.

got photos of streetS when the storm hit.

 Debris everywhere 1/4 mile area through the ridge 

 trees tops killed. 
Straight line winds killed areas up here.

no news etc 

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3 hours ago, wdrag said:

I want to close with a few pieces of information, including graphics for Isaias-tropical connection. 

Borrowed this written piece from Ramblin Red post on tropical forum: 

Good article on the effects of the storm from the Wash Post. 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2020/08/05/isaias-power-outages/?hpid=hp_national1-8-12_cwgisaias-3pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory-ans

78 mph: The wind gust clocked one mile southwest of Battery Park City in Manhattan and in Farmingdale, on Long Island. Numerous gusts reached around 70 mph in the New York City boroughs, including at JFK and La Guardia airports, both located in Queens.

Oak Island, N.C.: 87 mph

Cape May, N.J.: 75 mph

 

Ocean City, Md.: 74 mph

McClellanville, S.C.: 78 mph

Dewey Beach, Del.: 68 mph

Assateague, Va.: 68 mph

Wallops Island, Va.: 68 mph

Atlantic City, N.J.: 66 mph

Norfolk: 61 mph

Virginia Beach: 59 mph

Richmond: 51 mph

146 mph: The wind gust measured at the top of Mount Washington, N.H., the highest on record there in the month of August.

115: The number of tornado warnings the National Weather Service issued over the storm’s duration.

33: The number of tornado reports associated with Isaias that the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center received Monday and Tuesday. 

Nine inches: The rainfall in Sotterley, Md., in St. Mary’s County, less than 60 miles southeast of Washington. Widespread rainfall totals along Isaias’s path reached three to six inches, with localized amounts between six and nine inches. Some of the heaviest rain fell from eastern Virginia through Washington’s eastern suburbs in Maryland into eastern Pennsylvania and southern New York.

-------------

First image: Leftover power outages 48 hours after Isaias passed.  Rainfall, departure from norm and percent departure from normal Aug 1-5 (ending 12z/5).  Guidance was on the right track...just a bit too far east of the reality.  No classic PRE occurred because no surface high north of us and not enough separation between the hybrid PRE late Monday-early Tuesday and Isaias. Finally, a little more detail in the last image with the NWS MARFC radar-platform integration of rainfall (7- near 10" in brown)   Not much more I can add. I think  70 MPH gust event was pretty good  for our coastal areas and that the HRRRX wind gust predictor while maybe 10 kt high at 24 hours was very accurate within 12 hours. 829P/6

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 7.58.50 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.33.39 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.34.28 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-06 at 12.35.05 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-05 at 8.52.53 PM.png

Walt,

I am confident a twister hit highland lakes sweeping the tree tops.

my house lost 6 tree tops...I have photos. Micro burst or twister people nears my house  lost tree tops ..tops of trees 

 

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3 hours ago, mob1 said:

I think Islip had 90 mph as well. I personally recorded a gust of over 80 mph in Brooklyn during Sandy, my highest ever. Between the wind and extreme storm surge, it'll take a LOT to top Sandy IMO. 

The duration of Sandy is what made it so historic. Consistent 50+ mph wind gusts for 24+ hours. The peak wind gusts were incredible but the winds were pounding the area for what seemed like forever. No storm in my lifetime has come close to matching Sandy from a wind standpoint. The sheer size of the storm was mindblowing.

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Plenty of outages here in Westchester, people are getting fed up with Con Ed's (highest utility rates in the country) response. Eversource in CT mean while badly under estimated Tues TS.

https://dailyvoice.com/new-york/armonk/news/isaias-con-ed-draws-ire-of-westchester-officials-for-handling-of-tropical-storm/792080/

https://ctmirror.org/2020/08/05/lamont-says-it-will-take-days-to-recover-power/

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I don't understand how everybody thinks power restoration can happen much more quickly than it is. For instance, there's a street lower down on my hill that had over 70 trees down, those have to be cut out before the trucks can get in to deal with the ONE that took out the power line. There are many streets like this and many problems similar to this. What about the dozens (hundreds?) of snapped utility poles, do you think the suppliers just happen to have replacements for them just sitting around waiting to be used? What about the specialty crews that do that work, how many can each company have available? With staff reductions over the last few years they have to draw on assistance from other areas but those companies also have reduced staff. I get it that rates have ballooned in most areas and the expectation is that maintenance and service should be better but, unfortunately, that's not the way it works. 

Don't get me wrong, I'm certainly not defending the power supply co's and I can't stand that we're all stuck paying more for a system that's inherently broken but when I watched a group of my neighbors screaming at a guy that was assessing the damage so he could call in the right kind of crews to solve the problem and he was from Illinois and had just finished driving here a few hours before that I realized that people's expectations are simply too high. They all seemed to think he was just going to jump in the bucket and fire up the chainsaw right there on the spot, that's not how it works. 

Sorry I'm just getting tired of the complaining. We live in an area plagued by an antiquated network of overhead supply lines and there is no easy solution to that or to the storm damage that follows. A little bit of self sufficiency can go a long way, a decent small generator goes a long way as does a rooftop or yard solar installation (if you can afford it) can ease the pain.

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11 minutes ago, gravitylover said:

I don't understand how everybody thinks power restoration can happen much more quickly than it is. For instance, there's a street lower down on my hill that had over 70 trees down, those have to be cut out before the trucks can get in to deal with the ONE that took out the power line. There are many streets like this and many problems similar to this. What about the dozens (hundreds?) of snapped utility poles, do you think the suppliers just happen to have replacements for them just sitting around waiting to be used? What about the specialty crews that do that work, how many can each company have available? With staff reductions over the last few years they have to draw on assistance from other areas but those companies also have reduced staff. I get it that rates have ballooned in most areas and the expectation is that maintenance and service should be better but, unfortunately, that's not the way it works. 

Don't get me wrong, I'm certainly not defending the power supply co's and I can't stand that we're all stuck paying more for a system that's inherently broken but when I watched a group of my neighbors screaming at a guy that was assessing the damage so he could call in the right kind of crews to solve the problem and he was from Illinois and had just finished driving here a few hours before that I realized that people's expectations are simply too high. They all seemed to think he was just going to jump in the bucket and fire up the chainsaw right there on the spot, that's not how it works. 

Sorry I'm just getting tired of the complaining. We live in an area plagued by an antiquated network of overhead supply lines and there is no easy solution to that or to the storm damage that follows. A little bit of self sufficiency can go a long way, a decent small generator goes a long way as does a rooftop or yard solar installation (if you can afford it) can ease the pain.

Most people haven't the faintest idea about things outside of their very narrow field of vision nor are they capable of empathy or imagination, plus, they're just pissed off that the power's out.  Probably everyone here has had a boss at one time or another who wanted a week's worth of work done by lunchtime.

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19 minutes ago, gravitylover said:

I don't understand how everybody thinks power restoration can happen much more quickly than it is. For instance, there's a street lower down on my hill that had over 70 trees down, those have to be cut out before the trucks can get in to deal with the ONE that took out the power line. There are many streets like this and many problems similar to this. What about the dozens (hundreds?) of snapped utility poles, do you think the suppliers just happen to have replacements for them just sitting around waiting to be used? What about the specialty crews that do that work, how many can each company have available? With staff reductions over the last few years they have to draw on assistance from other areas but those companies also have reduced staff. I get it that rates have ballooned in most areas and the expectation is that maintenance and service should be better but, unfortunately, that's not the way it works. 

Don't get me wrong, I'm certainly not defending the power supply co's and I can't stand that we're all stuck paying more for a system that's inherently broken but when I watched a group of my neighbors screaming at a guy that was assessing the damage so he could call in the right kind of crews to solve the problem and he was from Illinois and had just finished driving here a few hours before that I realized that people's expectations are simply too high. They all seemed to think he was just going to jump in the bucket and fire up the chainsaw right there on the spot, that's not how it works. 

Sorry I'm just getting tired of the complaining. We live in an area plagued by an antiquated network of overhead supply lines and there is no easy solution to that or to the storm damage that follows. A little bit of self sufficiency can go a long way, a decent small generator goes a long way as does a rooftop or yard solar installation (if you can afford it) can ease the pain.

Couldn't agree more. I feel lucky that we got ours back after 50 hours or so. Sandy was 11 days and there are alot of places that still don't have theirs back yet.

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7 minutes ago, Will - Rutgers said:

Most people haven't the faintest idea about things outside of their very narrow field of vision nor are they capable of empathy or imagination, plus, they're just pissed off that the power's out.  Probably everyone here has had a boss at one time or another who wanted a week's worth of work done by lunchtime.

Exactly..Its something I've said many times. Outside of a person's profession and specific areas of education...many are totally oblivious.

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What a mess a TS did on this area, I'm still drying out my basement.

Thankfully the power was only out for 6hrs though half the town is still without it. 

I don't think we're done either this year but I really hope we don't see another system. They may be exciting in the moment but the aftermath is horrendous, it's def not like a snowstorm. 

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1 hour ago, SnoSki14 said:

What a mess a TS did on this area, I'm still drying out my basement.

Thankfully the power was only out for 6hrs though half the town is still without it. 

I don't think we're done either this year but I really hope we don't see another system. They may be exciting in the moment but the aftermath is horrendous, it's def not like a snowstorm. 

Yeah, snowstorms are worse. The power goes out here pretty often in winter storms and boy does the house get cold in a hurry when that happens. At least during the other 3 seasons the chances of frozen pipes are pretty slim and while it sux to sleep when the dewpoint is in the 70's its better than when the house is 38°.  We've had a few early and late season snowstorms that were just devastating and made life really suck.

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Isaias was the first tropical cyclone to peak at category 1 to cause so much wind damage and power outages in our area. All our other tropical systems  since at least the 1970s that caused so much damage peaked as a major hurricane  and weakened by the time they reached our area. This event was the first to reach us near peak intensity. 
 

Tropical cyclones causing extensive wind damage and power outages peak intensity

1976...Belle....category 3...957mb...120 mph

1985...Gloria..................4...919 mb...145 mph

2011...Irene....................3...942mb...120 mph

2012...Sandy...................3...940mb...115 mph

2020...Isaias...................1...987mb....85 mph

 

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2 hours ago, Will - Rutgers said:

Most people haven't the faintest idea about things outside of their very narrow field of vision nor are they capable of empathy or imagination, plus, they're just pissed off that the power's out.  Probably everyone here has had a boss at one time or another who wanted a week's worth of work done by lunchtime.

I think it has to do with lack of resources and manpower. NYC can pay big money for lots of con ed workers on overtime to get power back asap. Some of these smaller cities and towns don't have that option so it takes longer. 

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Alot of trees still  down here in Brooklyn.  I wonder how long it will take them to clear the down trees.

Some trees are blocking the roads

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28 minutes ago, MJO812 said:

Alot of trees still  down here in Brooklyn.  I wonder how long it will take them to clear the down trees.

Some trees are blocking the roads

Same thing out here people are simmering mad

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2 hours ago, gravitylover said:

Yeah, snowstorms are worse. The power goes out here pretty often in winter storms and boy does the house get cold in a hurry when that happens. At least during the other 3 seasons the chances of frozen pipes are pretty slim and while it sux to sleep when the dewpoint is in the 70's its better than when the house is 38°.  We've had a few early and late season snowstorms that were just devastating and made life really suck.

The only difference is that the food might not go back if the power goes out in the winter compared to the summer months.

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Finally finished cleaning my campus today. 

I have been driving around on the way home each day and I have to say the tree damage in some areas is on par with Sandy. The Wantagh woods saw multiple oaks split mid way up, and Sandy seemed to be more uproot. 
 

Another lasting impact is the salt damage near the south shore. The south sides of trees within a mile of the bay are completely brown. Right on the water and on the barrier islands they are completely brown. I’m sure this will lead to more vegetation loss

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