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Today is another example of why I think a dew point component makes sense in the definition of a “heat wave”. My high so far is 88. I will probably not make it to 90 again today, actually, I rarely do. But my dew point is routinely 76-78 making the heat index in the upper 90s. 

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1 minute ago, tdp146 said:

Today is another example of why I think a dew point component makes sense in the definition of a “heat wave”. My high so far is 88. I will probably not make it to 90 again today, actually, I rarely do. But my dew point is routinely 76-78 making the heat index in the upper 90s. 

Also many places especially over interior nj average 86 to 88 this time of year so 90 is nothing special

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7 minutes ago, tdp146 said:

Today is another example of why I think a dew point component makes sense in the definition of a “heat wave”. My high so far is 88. I will probably not make it to 90 again today, actually, I rarely do. But my dew point is routinely 76-78 making the heat index in the upper 90s. 

88/75/98 at islip. 

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18 minutes ago, tdp146 said:

Today is another example of why I think a dew point component makes sense in the definition of a “heat wave”. My high so far is 88. I will probably not make it to 90 again today, actually, I rarely do. But my dew point is routinely 76-78 making the heat index in the upper 90s. 

Our air temperatures may be a bit cooler out here and we may have a stronger breeze, but we make up for it with the higher humidity and dew points. Places that are hotter usually have more drier air mixing down.

I'm at 86.5/76.8 ... temp/dewpoint

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1 minute ago, TWCCraig said:

Our air temperatures may be a bit cooler out here and we may have a stronger breeze, but we make up for it with the higher humidity and dew points. Places that are hotter usually have more drier air mixing down as well.

I'm at 86.5/76.8 ... temp/dewpoint

 

 

For sure. 90/75 which I have now is 101 heat index. 98/65 is also 101 heat index. It’s atrocious outside. Last evening wasn’t terrible with the breeze once the sun set. 

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1 hour ago, bluewave said:

Unusually tropical along the Long Island Sound . Upper 70s dewpoints in New Haven and a 105° heat index.The low 80s SSTs are near the warmest we have ever seen them. 
 

https://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/station_page.php?station=nwhc3

New Haven      MOSUNNY   92  77 HX 105

3077C290-28BF-43CC-81DF-88BDBC0C4610.png.3dd7104402a066a31a5cfe6deafadcb3.png

 

 

Not the Sound but I was at Long Beach yday and I have a fitness watch, it measure water temp etc..not of great scientific quality I assume but it was constantly showing low 80s. I've had it touch 80 time to time to time in the water but never just hold steady like that for 45 mins in the water, maintaining and avg 80+. It definetly felt the part.

 

Meanwhile it's 93/77/107

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Under mainly sunny skies, temperatures again rose into the 90s across the northern Middle Atlantic and southern New England areas. A few locations experienced cooling thundershowers. High temperatures included:

Albany: 95° (tied record set in 1909 and tied in 1983)
Allentown: 94°
Atlantic City: 92°
Baltimore: 94°
Boston: 98° (old record: 96°, 1983)
Bridgeport: 90°
Concord: 96° (old record: 95°, 1870 and 2001)
Hartford: 94°
Manchester, NH: 99° (old record: 95°, 1949)
New York City: 93°
Newark: 99°
Philadelphia: 97°
Portland: 95° (tied record set in 1949)
Poughkeepsie: 94°
Providence: 95° (tied record set in 1909)
Scranton: 94° (tied record set in 1918 and tied in 1930 and 2001)
Washington, DC: 93°
Wilmington, DE: 94°
Worcester: 92°

Boston recorded its 5th consecutive 95° day. That is tied for the second longest such streak with July 2-6, 1911.

Tomorrow will see the conclusion of the current round of hot weather. Temperatures will reach the lower and middle 90s in many parts of the region. Showers and thundershowers are likely.

Cooler air will begin to arrive by midweek. The weekend could feature unseasonably cool weather. Outside of the Philadelphia and New York City urban areas, the potential exists for low temperatures to fall into the 50s at some locations.

Across the Atlantic Ocean, parts of the UK, including London, could see another round of withering heat. Temperatures could top out near or above 95° on Thursday and Friday.

The ECMWF seasonal forecast indicates that the summer will be warmer than normal throughout the region and across much of North America. Based on how the pattern has been evolving during the spring transition to summer, it is more likely than not that the warmest anomalies of the summer will likely occur in July and August with June being the coolest of the three months in the Northeast.

In addition, in the 6 past cases when the June AO averaged +0.750 or above (1950-2021), 67% of the following August and September cases featured above normal temperatures. The August ECMWF forecast shows a warmer than normal September in the Northeast.

The ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly was -0.6°C and the Region 3.4 anomaly was -1.0°C for the week centered around August 3. For the past six weeks, the ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly has averaged -1.05°C and the ENSO Region 3.4 anomaly has averaged -0.68°C. La Niña conditions will likely persist into the fall.

The SOI was +4.19 today.

The preliminary Arctic Oscillation (AO) was +0.741 today.

On August 6 the MJO was in Phase 5 at an amplitude of 1.270 (RMM). The August 5-adjusted amplitude was 1.211 (RMM).

Based on sensitivity analysis applied to the latest guidance, there is an implied 62% probability that New York City will have a warmer than normal August (1991-2020 normal). August will likely finish with a mean temperature near 77.4° (1.3° above normal).

 

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Under mainly sunny skies, temperatures again rose into the 90s across the northern Middle Atlantic and southern New England areas. A few locations experienced cooling thundershowers. High temperatures included:
Albany: 95° (tied record set in 1909 and tied in 1983)
Allentown: 94°
Atlantic City: 92°
Baltimore: 94°
Boston: 98° (old record: 96°, 1983)
Bridgeport: 90°
Concord: 96° (old record: 95°, 1870 and 2001)
Hartford: 94°
Manchester, NH: 99° (old record: 95°, 1949)
New York City: 93°
Newark: 99°
Philadelphia: 97°
Portland: 95° (tied record set in 1949)
Poughkeepsie: 94°
Providence: 95° (tied record set in 1909)
Scranton: 94° (tied record set in 1918 and tied in 1930 and 2001)
Washington, DC: 93°
Wilmington, DE: 94°
Worcester: 92°
Boston recorded its 5th consecutive 95° day. That is tied for the second longest such streak with July 2-6, 1911.
Tomorrow will see the conclusion of the current round of hot weather. Temperatures will reach the lower and middle 90s in many parts of the region. Showers and thundershowers are likely.
Cooler air will begin to arrive by midweek. The weekend could feature unseasonably cool weather. Outside of the Philadelphia and New York City urban areas, the potential exists for low temperatures to fall into the 50s at some locations.
Across the Atlantic Ocean, parts of the UK, including London, could see another round of withering heat. Temperatures could top out near or above 95° on Thursday and Friday.
The ECMWF seasonal forecast indicates that the summer will be warmer than normal throughout the region and across much of North America. Based on how the pattern has been evolving during the spring transition to summer, it is more likely than not that the warmest anomalies of the summer will likely occur in July and August with June being the coolest of the three months in the Northeast.
In addition, in the 6 past cases when the June AO averaged +0.750 or above (1950-2021), 67% of the following August and September cases featured above normal temperatures. The August ECMWF forecast shows a warmer than normal September in the Northeast.
The ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly was -0.6°C and the Region 3.4 anomaly was -1.0°C for the week centered around August 3. For the past six weeks, the ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly has averaged -1.05°C and the ENSO Region 3.4 anomaly has averaged -0.68°C. La Niña conditions will likely persist into the fall.
The SOI was +4.19 today.
The preliminary Arctic Oscillation (AO) was +0.741 today.
On August 6 the MJO was in Phase 5 at an amplitude of 1.270 (RMM). The August 5-adjusted amplitude was 1.211 (RMM).
Based on sensitivity analysis applied to the latest guidance, there is an implied 62% probability that New York City will have a warmer than normal August (1991-2020 normal). August will likely finish with a mean temperature near 77.4° (1.3° above normal).
 

Dry impressive heat.


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15 minutes ago, wthrmn654 said:

86.5. Haven't hit 90 yet in August 

Same here. 88.3 was the warmest. Most days are maxing out between 86-88. Strong southerly sea breeze here keeping us from hitting 90. I'm only about 2 and a half miles from the water

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34 minutes ago, TWCCraig said:

Cool down for this upcoming weekend and then slowly fading back into an above normal pattern. Euro weeklies continue the above normal pattern into September through the end of its run

Above normal is the default without blocking. Weeklies struggle to pick up on blocking until we get closer.

But hell even 80s would be way better than this crap. 

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