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Hurricane Ian


Scott747
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BULLETIN
Hurricane Ian Advisory Number  16
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL092022
1100 PM EDT Mon Sep 26 2022

...IAN EXPECTED TO BECOME A MAJOR HURRICANE OVERNIGHT OR EARLY 
TUESDAY...
...SIGNIFICANT WIND AND STORM SURGE IMPACTS WILL BEGIN
IN WESTERN CUBA VERY SOON...


SUMMARY OF 1100 PM EDT...0300 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...21.3N 83.4W
ABOUT 105 MI...170 KM ESE OF THE WESTERN TIP OF CUBA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...105 MPH...165 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NNW OR 340 DEGREES AT 13 MPH...20 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...962 MB...28.41 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

None.
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Hurricane Ian Discussion Number  16
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL092022
1100 PM EDT Mon Sep 26 2022

Ian continues to become better organized on satellite images with 
intense deep convection in its Central Dense Overcast and numerous 
surrounding banding features.  The overall cloud pattern is quite 
symmetric with well-defined upper-level outflow.  Observations from 
both Air Force and NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that the 
central pressure is falling, and the intensity is increased to 90 
kt based on a recently reported 700 mb flight-level wind of 101 kt 
from the Air Force plane.  This is also in agreement with a 
subjective Dvorak satellite estimate from SAB.

Aside from its relatively brief time passing over western Cuba, Ian 
will be moving over waters of very high oceanic heat content during 
the next couple of days.  The various Rapid Intensification (RI) 
indices show a significant probability of RI and this is reflected 
in the short-term official intensity forecast.  However, the SHIPS 
guidance, which is based on global model predictions, indicates that 
a significant increase in southwesterly shear and a substantially 
drying of low- to mid-level air will begin in 24-36 hours.  The NHC 
forecast, like the previous one, shows strengthening to Category 4 
intensity in a day or so, followed by gradual weakening.  However, 
Ian is still expected to be a major hurricane when it reaches the 
Florida west coast.  The official intensity forecast is near or 
above the latest simple and corrected multi-model consensus 
predictions.

Ian continues its north-northwestward trek at about 340/11 kt.  The 
hurricane is expected to move north-northwestward to northward 
over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico during the next day or so, 
along the western periphery of a subtropical ridge.  After around 
36 hours, the track forecast becomes more uncertain, since there is 
considerable divergence of the track  models in the 2-3 day 
time frame.  The guidance also shows considerable slowing of the 
forward speed, due to a weakening of the steering currents, when 
Ian approaches the west coast of Florida.  This slower forward 
motion is likely to prolong the storm surge, wind, and rainfall 
impacts, especially along the west coast of Florida.  The official 
track forecast is adjusted just slightly east of the previous NHC 
prediction based on the latest multi-model consensus aid, TVCN.


Key Messages:

1. Life-threatening storm surge, hurricane-force winds, flash floods 
and possible mudslides are expected in portions of western Cuba 
beginning overnight and continuing into Tuesday. Devastating wind 
damage is possible where the core of Ian moves across western Cuba. 
Efforts to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

2. There is a danger of life-threatening storm surge along much
of the Florida west coast where a storm surge warning has been
issued, with the highest risk from Fort Myers to the Tampa Bay
region.  Residents in these areas should listen to advice given by
local officials.

3. Hurricane-force winds are expected in the hurricane warning area
in west-central Florida beginning Wednesday morning with tropical
storm conditions expected by late Tuesday.

4. Heavy rainfall will spread across western Cuba through Tuesday.  
This will likely produce instances of flash flooding and possible 
mudslides in areas of higher terrain over western Cuba.  

5. Heavy rainfall will increase across the Florida Keys and South 
Florida Tuesday, spreading into central and northern Florida 
Wednesday and Thursday and the Southeast by Friday and Saturday, 
potentially causing flash, urban and small stream flooding. 
Considerable flooding, including significant, prolonged river 
flooding, is likely across Central Florida.


FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT  27/0300Z 21.3N  83.4W   90 KT 105 MPH
 12H  27/1200Z 22.8N  83.7W  105 KT 120 MPH
 24H  28/0000Z 24.5N  83.7W  120 KT 140 MPH
 36H  28/1200Z 26.1N  83.5W  115 KT 130 MPH
 48H  29/0000Z 27.2N  83.1W  105 KT 120 MPH
 60H  29/1200Z 27.9N  82.7W   95 KT 110 MPH...INLAND
 72H  30/0000Z 28.6N  82.4W   65 KT  75 MPH...INLAND
 96H  01/0000Z 31.3N  82.2W   30 KT  35 MPH...INLAND
120H  02/0000Z 35.0N  81.5W   25 KT  30 MPH...INLAND

$$
Forecaster Pasch
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I was expecting higher winds on 11pm advisory. Not sure it will be a major before hitting Cuba like NHC is forecasting. Cuba will likely halt the intensification and induce some weakening. Curious if we will truly see Ian it hits max potential strength in se Gulf before it encounters more hostile conditions nearing landfall. 

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3 minutes ago, NYGiantsFan99 said:

something something, significant reduction of average foward motion of landfalling tropical systems due to anthropogenic climate change, something :(

is this incorrect? i thought this was a major part of the latest IPCC report. confused as to why im getting weenie’d. i do not mean to spread misinformation or start anything so please correct me if im wrong, fairly new at this (just graduated)

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40 minutes ago, NYGiantsFan99 said:

is this incorrect? i thought this was a major part of the latest IPCC report. confused as to why im getting weenie’d. i do not mean to spread misinformation or start anything so please correct me if im wrong, fairly new at this (just graduated)

It’s generally seen as a weenie take to attribute the behavior of an individual storm to climate change. The effects of climate change manifest in aggregate trends over years and decades. The connection with individual storms is weak.

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9 minutes ago, GoAPPS said:

It’s generally seen as a weenie take to attribute the behavior of an individual storm to climate change. The effects of climate change manifest in aggregate trends over years and decades. The connection with individual storms is weak.

understand the confusion now. thank you. i certainly did not mean to 100% attribute it to climate change, merely link the two as we have seen a major uptick in storms, often including the upper end of storms, slowing down prior to landfall in the past 10-15 years. is all of that due to increased global avg temperatures? of course not. it just contributes to it when conditions are ripe for it, like in this case, irma, harvey, michael, etc. thank you for explaining though, always looking for constructive criticism!

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1 hour ago, MattPetrulli said:


Curious about the second spike. Anyone wanna chime in?
674442aff9b04a884530368555711549.jpg

On the graph? It’s showing what the flight level wind and pressure is doing as the recon flight traverses the storm…..those are twenty minute increments….red is pressure and blue is wind….. wind spikes right before you punch through the eyewall then tanks…..pressure continuously tanks until their heading away from the eye…..

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