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Dec. 10-11 Severe Weather


Indystorm
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16 minutes ago, andyhb said:

This is ridiculously intense damage near Earlington KY.

Those are possibly the most extreme damage indicators I've seen. 

You can also see multiple trees in virtually every direction in this photo -- suggesting the tornado was likely multi-vortex at this stage as this appears to be a small suction vortice.

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The roar man…
WOW. At 20 seconds into that clip a car drives by between the camera and tornado and really gives perspective on the enormous size of this tornado.

Jaw was dropped before the car...And after? Complete disbelief. This was a huge tornado!

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

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Took a drive out to the damage area about 20 mins south of here shortly before sunset.  Surprisingly the road was still closed with crews on scene and I was not able to get a close look.  Assumed it would've been cleaned up enough by now.  Looking back at radar images, there was a clear signature for a little while so it'll most likely be confirmed eventually.

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38 minutes ago, e pluribus unum said:

Death toll in the Edwardsville tornado is now up to 6. 

 

It's horrible. 

 

Watched the briefing on it. They have no idea how many are unaccounted for. Amazon has not reached out to any of the responders or emergency agencies. They have already put an end to rescue efforts and are now recovery only from 7am to 5pm daily, basically only working in daylight conditions.

 

They said part of the reason for not knowing how many are still unaccounted for was it occured during a shift change and there was also part time employees involved. They did not know if there was a designated storm shelter in the facility.

 

Only mention of Amazon corporate was that Pritzker had said he contacted them and told them they need to step up and help the community and victims families. No one from Amazon had been on site to assist.

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17 minutes ago, andyhb said:

https://www.facebook.com/stevecampbell23/videos/620717605842904

This right here is one of the most complete wipeouts I've ever seen after a tornado. Bremen, KY.

High end EF4/EF5 material.

Man, there is some pretty incredible sweeping, and then later on just reveals a complex multi-vortex structure to the damage on a ridiculous scale. 

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I really hope that at some point we get a postmortem on what happened to the radar at Paducah. If there's physical damage that took Paducah down -- fine, that's going to happen sometimes. But what I find inexcusable is that many meteorologists, especially public facing meteorologists doing newscasts, failed to recognize that it was serving old data and subsequently gave many timelines that were off by like 10 minutes.

My point is this: it's not their fault that they didn't recognize this when they're busy with running a newscast. The problem is structural in the protocols and tools that are used to distribute this data. If a data source goes down, it needs to not publish old data as if it's new, and there need to be big warning signs in all the tools that you're looking at old data. It should never happen that a meteorologist is telling people that the tornado will be there in 10 minutes when in reality it's already over the city.

But that happened last night. And it's a huge failure.

I think this issue, which is fundamentally a software issue in my mind, probably cost at least one person their life.

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Depending on what kind of info comes out about the super long tracked tornado in the upcoming days, we may want to consider having a separate thread for it for easy reference.  Could include images, historical context, cleanup progress, rebuilding progress, etc.  We may be dealing with something that is pretty historic overall (it certainly is for the state of Kentucky).  

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I am growing more certain the tossed freight train (the individual cars average 200 tons) and the tossed and crumpled water tower with the weight of hundreds of thousands of gallons of water that even had its anchored concrete footers ripped up along with it will give a 5 rating.

Also regarding the post about the confirmed Branson West, MO tornado, a big amusement/theme park called Silver Dollar City is literally right down the road from there. They had 20,000+ people on site for their Christmas event when this was going on. If that tornado had not dissipated and moved towards the park that could have been another mass casualty event right there even with the low EF scale rating. With the storm speeds averaging 40-60 mph there would be no time to evacuate the park with all those people jam packed out in the open.

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One thing that stuck out to me while following the mesoanalysis that night was how the cap eroded perfectly ahead of the storm like a police escort. Pretty much everything to the north and east couldn’t get surface based and nothing fired up to its immediate south. The storm essentially had free reign until the main line caught it in a very moist, extreme helicity environment. I can’t really recall ever seeing anything exactly like this

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Had a bit of a personal scare with the Bowling Green tornado. I was visiting my folks in the Louisville area Friday night, in town for my gramma's 90th birthday. The BG tornado passed not quite a quarter of a mile south of my brother's place ("Ben" on the RadarScope images below). We couldn't get ahold of him until later Saturday morning due to the power/cell outages. Fortunately, he was OK, made it out of town eventually and in time for the birthday party. He mentioned hearing two tornadoes, the northern-most of which dissipated first.

229307125_ScreenShot2021-12-12at10_02_54AM.png.3520bf3496befba7f8d0beb64c82e803.png

1431808436_ScreenShot2021-12-12at9_45_19AM.thumb.png.4d872f0413bca245bfc629e69afbf3c4.png

Didn't find any debris from the long-track ("Mayfield") tornado at my parents place in IN, but just saw this article on CNN from someone across the river from Louisville who found a picture from 150 miles away. This passed over Louisville during UPS' busy period at SDF. I have not heard for sure but I imagine a few of their jets may have ingested some of this on approach. 

882008570_ScreenShot2021-12-12at9_52_33AM.thumb.png.31d0d1c346d06b665fbd052d0688a6c7.png

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Here's some more damage pics. All of which are extremely impressive. It's getting to the point where I'll be stunned if this isn't EF5. The spatial extent and degree of intense damage is basically unparalleled in the modern era except for Hackleburg. We're talking a 100 mile strech (Cayce to Bremen) where there are high confidence EF4+ damage indicators. The damage present in Mayfield is not the worst that this tornado produced, or even close to it, and that says a lot.

49646179736aed72ebe6d9a149117973.png66755446622ca1bf585373820ddeaa3b.pngFGXY7u1XEAUTzbs.png

 

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Oh goodness.

Governor of Kentucky just said on an interview I heard on NPR that he fears the tornado from 12/10 "will be the deadliest in the history of the United States."

Even if it doesn't come fully to fruition (I doubt he knows the exact number from the TST of 1925), that is a seriously concerning statement.

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Just now, CryHavoc said:

Oh goodness.

Governor of Kentucky just said on an interview I heard on NPR that he fears the tornado from 12/10 "will be the deadliest in the history of the United States."

Even if it doesn't come fully to fruition (I doubt he knows the exact number from the TST of 1925), that is a seriously concerning statement.

There's also Joplin...

but yeah. These are death counts you never want to see in the NEXRAD area (only happened three times before, all within 26 days in 2011); that mean either something went horribly wrong with the warning system/public response, the tornado was extremely, extremely strong, or both.

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