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https://www.boston.com/news/weather/2021/11/08/snow-plow-driver-shortage-massachusetts-high-rates/?p1=hp_secondary

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Watertown is paying up to $200 for plow drivers with a commercial license, and the rates increase to $310 for those with specialized equipment. Worcester and Lowell are paying up to $155 an hour, and Sandwich is offering up to $135. Chelmsford is paying up to $110, and even MassDOT is looking for drivers, though offering a lower rate of $31.25, NBC10 Boston reported.

 

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Just now, Baroclinic Zone said:

Seriously.  I recall my neighbor a bunch of years ago signing up for plowing for City of Taunton.  Hours can be brutal.

The hours are brutal and it becomes a safety risk. I know accidents that have happened from plow drivers falling asleep. But dang that money though. 

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1 hour ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

Would've been nice if NBC10 Boston had noted that the MassDOT rate was for just the driver and the big numbers were for both truck and driver.  Still a decent rate from MDOT though it's earned.

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10 minutes ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

This is not good for the average consumer or for small restaurants/food establishments. 
 

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/09/wholesale-prices-rise-8point6percent-year-over-year-in-october-tied-for-highest-ever.html

Yup, and you wonder why people are fed up with their jobs.  Having to pay more for food, utilities, gas, etc and most likely not seeing a commensurate raise to cover the cost of those increases.  Why bother going back to work for shit pay.

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1 hour ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

Towns will be burning through budgets as quickly as Ray burns through his pants when he releases gas.    


This is not sustainable within most tax bases, and will be worse if the winter brings heavy amounts of snow.  Unfortunately, buy now and pay later is the current theme of our time.

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4 hours ago, Cold Miser said:

Towns will be burning through budgets as quickly as Ray burns through his pants when he releases gas.    


This is not sustainable within most tax bases, and will be worse if the winter brings heavy amounts of snow.  Unfortunately, buy now and pay later is the current theme of our time.

Employees cost A LOT now in many jobs.  It’s incredible the staffing shortages everywhere.  Even when I was down in Hilton Head and Savannah, Georgia a few weeks ago the local grocery stores were advertising $20/hr to bag groceries.  $25/hr if you wanted to stock shelves at night with up to 60hrs/week possible.

Stocking grocery store shelves paying more than public school teachers and law enforcement down there it seemed.

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13 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Employees cost A LOT now in many jobs.  It’s incredible the staffing shortages everywhere.  Even when I was down in Hilton Head and Savannah, Georgia a few weeks ago the local grocery stores were advertising $20/hr to bag groceries.  $25/hr if you wanted to stock shelves at night with up to 60hrs/week possible.

Stocking grocery store shelves paying more than public school teachers and law enforcement down there it seemed.

Wow.  I saw the 15/hour to work at fast food joints in Myrtle Beach back in June, but the $20 to bag groceries? Just, wow.

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42 minutes ago, Cold Miser said:

Wow.  I saw the 15/hour to work at fast food joints in Myrtle Beach back in June, but the $20 to bag groceries? Just, wow.

Granted living anywhere near Hilton Head can’t be cheap.  I’m pretty sure it was a Kroger supermarket.

Every single ski area I know of is incredibly short staffed and wages are higher than ever… not like a dollar raise either but like $5+ per hour over what that same job was 2 winters ago.  Jobs that ski areas got away with paying $10/hr for a decade plus a ski pass are now at $15-$20… similar to the supermarket thing we were discussing.  Plus signing bonuses, referral bonuses, etc.

Its a great time to be a high schooler looking for part time work, lol.  I know a financial planner in town who said his high school daughter made over $20K this summer as a waitress in like 3 months.  I wouldn’t have known what to do with that money in high school lol.

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53 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Granted living anywhere near Hilton Head can’t be cheap.  I’m pretty sure it was a Kroger supermarket.

Every single ski area I know of is incredibly short staffed and wages are higher than ever… not like a dollar raise either but like $5+ per hour over what that same job was 2 winters ago.  Jobs that ski areas got away with paying $10/hr for a decade plus a ski pass are now at $15-$20… similar to the supermarket thing we were discussing.  Plus signing bonuses, referral bonuses, etc.

Its a great time to be a high schooler looking for part time work, lol.  I know a financial planner in town who said his high school daughter made over $20K this summer as a waitress in like 3 months.  I wouldn’t have known what to do with that money in high school lol.

Our waitress at a popular restaurant in Maine told me she quit her corporate job to waitress and makes $500 per night, she said less hours and less headaches. You work Thurs-Sunday that 2k for the week and you have all days off and 3 nights off, she said much less stress.

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17 hours ago, powderfreak said:

Granted living anywhere near Hilton Head can’t be cheap.  I’m pretty sure it was a Kroger supermarket.

Every single ski area I know of is incredibly short staffed and wages are higher than ever… not like a dollar raise either but like $5+ per hour over what that same job was 2 winters ago.  Jobs that ski areas got away with paying $10/hr for a decade plus a ski pass are now at $15-$20… similar to the supermarket thing we were discussing.  Plus signing bonuses, referral bonuses, etc.

Its a great time to be a high schooler looking for part time work, lol.  I know a financial planner in town who said his high school daughter made over $20K this summer as a waitress in like 3 months.  I wouldn’t have known what to do with that money in high school lol.

But, this will undoubtedly be brought back to the paying skier public...more expensive season passes (unless you got a deal last spring), more expensive day tix, more expensive food, more expensive rentals,  more expensive lodging, etc.  Those pay increases are not going to be paid without the customer paying for it. 

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Some people received a pleasant surprise in Lawrence on their annual flood insurance premium.

https://www.wbur.org/news/2021/11/10/lawrence-lowell-flood-insurance-risk-rate-hikes

https://www.wbur.org/news/2021/10/01/massachusetts-waterfront-property-flood-insurance-changes

All due to FEMA overhauling it's risk assessment nationwide.

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But on Oct. 1, Silverio said the cost of flood premiums seemed to go haywire. One customer who previously paid $300 a year in flood coverage just got a new quote for $5,770.

Good luck affording that monthly premium increase.

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1 hour ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

Some people received a pleasant surprise in Lawrence on their annual flood insurance premium.

https://www.wbur.org/news/2021/11/10/lawrence-lowell-flood-insurance-risk-rate-hikes

https://www.wbur.org/news/2021/10/01/massachusetts-waterfront-property-flood-insurance-changes

All due to FEMA overhauling it's risk assessment nationwide.

Good luck affording that monthly premium increase.

it's worse in Florida where this may have the largest impact. Rates will increase up to 18% per year until they reach market rates in a state where some parts are too risky for private insurance, and we're talking many miles inland too, so you can imagine how many thousands, maybe millions, of people this will hurt.

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Well the Fed has put themselves in a real bind. The "transitory" thesis seems to be heading out the window. CPI continues to rise, all the while rates remain jammed at zero and easing continues at near record levels. Meanwhile, you have coinciding bubbles in rates, stocks, real estate and some commodities. With so much debt jammed into the system, the Fed no longer has much latitude to fight inflation, at least not without risking an implosion across several asset classes at once. Then again, inflation could do the work of its own accord, as corporations begin to suffer margin compression or demand destruction if end users won't stomach rapid price increases. The Fed will come under increasing pressure regarding its market friendly policies, which have jacked up the wealth of Fed members themselves, and the wealthiest 10% of Americans, increasingly at the expense of the middle and lower middle class. Pressure to pull forward rate hikes and cause a deflationary pop is going to increase in the next several months. Given the high correlation across asset classes, including crypto to equities, I would be sweating here if I had large exposure.

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1 hour ago, Hoth said:

Well the Fed has put themselves in a real bind. The "transitory" thesis seems to be heading out the window. CPI continues to rise, all the while rates remain jammed at zero and easing continues at near record levels. Meanwhile, you have coinciding bubbles in rates, stocks, real estate and some commodities. With so much debt jammed into the system, the Fed no longer has much latitude to fight inflation, at least not without risking an implosion across several asset classes at once. Then again, inflation could do the work of its own accord, as corporations begin to suffer margin compression or demand destruction if end users won't stomach rapid price increases. The Fed will come under increasing pressure regarding its market friendly policies, which have jacked up the wealth of Fed members themselves, and the wealthiest 10% of Americans, increasingly at the expense of the middle and lower middle class. Pressure to pull forward rate hikes and cause a deflationary pop is going to increase in the next several months. Given the high correlation across asset classes, including crypto to equities, I would be sweating here if I had large exposure.

In layman's terms, what is "large exposure"?

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1 hour ago, drstuess said:

New England representing in the 2020 SAIDI data.0d46ee9a4129bc81d452b8a778665548.jpg

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

Our place did its share to put Maine atop the frequency score.  We also had significantly more hours than the Maine average, probably in the OK vicinity.  And we did it with no hurricanes or siggy Tors, though the April 2020 snowstorm was a factor.

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19 minutes ago, TauntonBlizzard2013 said:

Price of everything is insane right now. Credit card debt must be going through the roof.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/09/economy/fed-household-debt-inflation/index.html

 

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American households are carrying record amounts of debt as home and auto prices surge, Covid infections continue to fall and people get out their credit cards again.

Between July and September, US household debt climbed to a new record of $15.24 trillion, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said Tuesday.
It was an increase of 1.9%, or $286 billion, from the second quarter of the year.
"As pandemic relief efforts wind down, we are beginning to see the reversal of some of the credit card balance trends seen during the pandemic," such as lower spending in favor of paying down debt balances, said Donghoon Lee, research officer at the New York Fed.
 
 
Now that the stimulus sugar rush has worn off, consumers are going back to their old ways of spending with their credit cards. Credit card balances rose by $17 billion, just as they had during the second quarter. But they're still $123 bullion lower than at the end of 2019 before the pandemic hit.

 

 
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