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Ginx snewx

Mid October 2019 Bombogensis Coastal

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33 minutes ago, weathafella said:

Whoever comes up with the technology to bury wires without huge cost will cash in.  It’s out there somewhere.  

Wires are so old school...above or below ground.  If we’re going big, why can’t each home/apt or whatever harness and store its own energy. Granted, we’re probably a generation or two away and we need public policy changes/support, but let’s go big. 

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6 hours ago, Typhoon Tip said:

Purely speculation but the wind force was coming at the entire region from an unusual direction ?  

It had more of an easterly component to it - I'm not absolutely certain of that wind direction in Petersham; it's just that there was limited/no antecedent boundary layer additional forcing from colder viscous air mass, which with the more typical coastal cyclone circumstance ... causes the wind to back more NE or even N when lows cut east of that region. 

This was an unusual storm ... elevation probably does play a role where it was affecting inland.  I am here in the Nashoba Valley - for example - and really didn't even hear a single wind gust. Yet a friend lives similar distance as the crow flies from the coastal zones in Auburn at an elevation of 700' and said he lost power for a couple of hours and there is sporadic limbs here and there around the neighborhood.  Immediately E/S of his location there were no outages ... until RI, where all hell breaks loose..  That does seem to suggest both an elevation inland, or proficient mixing nearer the warm ociean (perhaps), as the two primary exposures in this event.

Anyway, if the more easterly component were true, that may also add to it that foliage stress patterns may not have been accustomed to that wind direction. Tam' up in Maine might have some insight there as he seems to be a bit of tree guy

This storm was odd, in that winds probably never gusted to 40 near my place and leaf drop was already well over 50% before the event started, yet we lost power for 29 hours.  The unusual wind direction for peak velocity may have some validity, however.  Looking back 2 years, when even fewer leaves remained on the trees (because it was nearly 2 weeks later), Maine was hammered and some think it was because our strongest gusts and most frequent strong winds are from the NW, so the SE winds of 2017 broke more trees than expected.  Also, many observers report that all the damage occurred in a short period, 15-30 minutes at any particular location though different times as the storm moved northward.  Resembled catching the edge of an eyewall or an extraordinarily widespread downburst.

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2 hours ago, tamarack said:

This storm was odd, in that winds probably never gusted to 40 near my place and leaf drop was already well over 50% before the event started, yet we lost power for 29 hours.  The unusual wind direction for peak velocity may have some validity, however.  Looking back 2 years, when even fewer leaves remained on the trees (because it was nearly 2 weeks later), Maine was hammered and some think it was because our strongest gusts and most frequent strong winds are from the NW, so the SE winds of 2017 broke more trees than expected.  Also, many observers report that all the damage occurred in a short period, 15-30 minutes at any particular location though different times as the storm moved northward.  Resembled catching the edge of an eyewall or an extraordinarily widespread downburst.

Like here, edge of dry slot gravity waves along with embedded mesos. I watched whole good oaks bend completely over with one gust, thats when I saw a blue flash twice. I was looking out the back with my hand held spot light at the time. The blue flash was a tree branch on the power lines across the street blowing the breaker on the transformer.  Cool stuff. 

We have had multiple SE big wind events here since Irene. The demise of the oak forest is in full swing.  Acres of dead trees.

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