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September 2020 Discussion

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3 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

That still blows my mind a place like Tolland uses SP. 

Pretty typical.  We have a police force but most towns in Ct have resident troopers.

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5 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

That still blows my mind a place like Tolland uses SP. 

.... well they ain't using 'TP' that's for sure with all the shit that's postin' outta dem dar hills ...

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25 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

Very early fall this year. Only 122 days of growing season. Colors are poppin

Screenshot_20200923-090908_Gallery.jpg

Agree on the "early" vibe- 

Although, I must also add that every year it seems that I tend to get fooled by the 'early' assessment, and then it turns out what I'm really seeing ...or remembering rather, is that a particular tree or grove of them may be earlier, while the general setting across the country side ends up being about average by mid October.   

I do think that year to year, the triggering may be differential within the biomass ...but that means there are regions that could even be late, such that the whole forestry ends up the same?  

Not sure, but around town here, definitely there are even healthier maples showing significant reds and saffron - it's like an abstract artist loaded up a wet brush with that area of the color wheel, and flicked it at a landscape canvassed by broccoli.    

My 'General Sherman,' a beautiful 250 to 300 year old maple at the corner of my property, with it's 100 foot spanned canopy and 60 some feet of heights, has always maxed color in the 2nd week of October, and it is almost half dyed already - hard to imagine how it is going to stall for two and half weeks to meet with that particular historical e.t.a.; it seems an early max is imminent.  

But why...?  

One thing I am noticing of this 'early' character is that there are more reds than I remember, both in the general...and around town.  I'm wondering - hypothetically - if we have some compounding factors enticing the early evacuation of certain pigments...  like, green going early, and leaving the red behind ...when perhaps the red tends to leave ( normally) more in the same temporal window.. like in general... Obviously not ubiquitous among all species and even down to the tree individual, depending on the climate that year leading in the latter sense. But year to year... This year we have [ maybe ] two distinct ... plausible triggers that are instructing some early releasing of green:   Solar minimum and smoke... I noticed that we were starting to just barely tinge prior to the smoke sky, onset from two weeks ago, Then, we pall-blued the heavens over in this unhealthy weary light, and even dimmed down to orb sun on several consecutive days... When all this red pops immediately coming out of that. 

Now, I tend to be a sucker for cause-and-effect... particularly, as a patterning...and when two unusual events pass through a given natural domain space, I tend to suspect a causality circuitry exists there... 

Who knows... 

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3 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

Agree on the "early" vibe- 

Although, I must also add that every year it seems that I tend to get fooled by the 'early' assessment, and then it turns out what I'm really seeing ...or remembering rather, is that a particular tree or grove of them may be earlier, while the general setting across the country side ends up being about average by mid October.   

I do think that year to year, the triggering may be differential within the biomass ...but that means there are regions that could even be late, such that the whole forestry ends up the same?  

Not sure, but around town here, definitely there are even healthier maples showing significant reds and saffron - it's like an abstract artist loaded up a wet brush with that area of the color wheel, and flicked it at a landscape canvassed by broccoli.    

My 'General Sherman,' a beautiful 250 to 300 year old maple at the corner of my property, with it's 100 foot spanned canopy and 60 some feet of heights, has always maxed color in the 2nd week of October, and it is almost half dyed already - hard to imagine how it is going to stall for two and half weeks, it seems an early max is imminent.  

By why...?  

One thing I am noticing of this 'early' character is that there are more reds than I remember, both in the general...and around town.  I'm wondering - hypothetically - if we have some compounding factors enticing the early evacuation of certain pigments...  like, green going early, and leaving the red behind ...when perhaps the red tends to leave ( normally) more in the same temporal window.. like in general... Obviously not ubiquitous among all species and even down to the tree individual, depending on the climate that year leading in the latter sense. But year to year... This year we have [ maybe ] two distinct ... plausibel triggers that are instructing some early releasing of green:   Solar minimum and smoke... I noticed that we were starting to just barely tinge prior to the smoke sky, onset from two weeks ago, ..then, we pall-blue and even dimmed down to orb sun on several consecutive days...and all this red pops immediately coming out of that. 

Now, I tend to be a sucker for cause-and-effect... particularly, as a patterning...and when two unusual events pass through a given natural domain space, I tend to suspect a causality circuitry exists there... 

Who knows... 

I have yearly pics back to 2010, this is early here anyways.  My boy is not a pup anymore and is a total ACATT dog. Spent the hot summer days inside but is prepping for snow. A warm spell coming up but for all intents and purposes we step down week by week. I agree there is causality in nature.

20200923_092614.jpg

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35 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

No water and no police dept in Tolland. May as well be Appalachia. 

No more nice lush green lawns either. DIT may as well put the pickup on cinder blocks in the front yard to complete the transformation. 

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Low near 50 this morning, big change from the past 4 days which averaged 59/26 and 12.5 BN, taking the month to -2.7 after being +2 on the 10th.  Now we go the other way, though I think the month ends up a bit BN.  Morning GFS chopped yesterday's 1.4" for Monday in Augusta down to 0.5".  A blip or a trend?

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51 minutes ago, NorEastermass128 said:

No more nice lush green lawns either. DIT may as well put the pickup on cinder blocks in the front yard to complete the transformation. 

The neighbors’ lawns looked fairly green. Must suck to be the one eyesore on the street that the neighbors talk shit about. 

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Just now, dendrite said:

The neighbors’ lawns looked fairly green. Must suck to be the one eyesore on the street that the neighbors talk shit about. 

i actually did not cut my grass for a few weeks and seemed to do better than my neighbors who cuts it every week, that was something new I learned, but I have one area that is basically just dirt now, will need to either hire someone to seed it or try and do it myself.

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31 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Low near 50 this morning, big change from the past 4 days which averaged 59/26 and 12.5 BN, taking the month to -2.7 after being +2 on the 10th.  Now we go the other way, though I think the month ends up a bit BN.  Morning GFS chopped yesterday's 1.4" for Monday in Augusta down to 0.5".  A blip or a trend?

By Sunday, we'll be looking at showers, 0.1-0.25"

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18 minutes ago, Bostonseminole said:

i actually did not cut my grass for a few weeks and seemed to do better than my neighbors who cuts it every week, that was something new I learned, but I have one area that is basically just dirt now, will need to either hire someone to seed it or try and do it myself.

Good move. Those of us who have lived thru previous periods learned as well the hard way or were passed on the information. 

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9 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

Good move. Those of us who have lived thru previous periods learned as well the hard way or were passed on the information. 

And wells are drying up because those same people who can't help but cut their lawn 3 times a week in a major drought are now dumping hundreds of gallons a day on their lawns in an attempt to save them. It really is a massively wasteful endeavor.

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16 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

And wells are drying up because those same people who can't help but cut their lawn 3 times a week in a major drought are now dumping hundreds of gallons a day on their lawns in an attempt to save them. It really is a massively wasteful endeavor.

I understand what you are saying but you seem overly harsh on people maintaining their lawns. It may not be important to you but to a lot of people it is. Just like planting and watering flowers, landscape, shrubbery, home maintenance, curb appeal, etc. it’s important to people who value their home, properties, appearance, value, etc. There are times when nature calls for cutting back to conserve, but that is hardly ever the case in this area and pride in people’s homes and the curb appeal has always been important to many just as other things in life may be to others. 

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When it is really dry, I cut back and just water the shrubs and some potted stuff my wife has. Lawn will take a back seat.  Usually that may last 4-6 weeks...but this year September has been really dry so far.

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29 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

And wells are drying up because those same people who can't help but cut their lawn 3 times a week in a major drought are now dumping hundreds of gallons a day on their lawns in an attempt to save them. It really is a massively wasteful endeavor.

I think it’s also important to point out the majority of wells going dry are shallow dug wells. You see articles like that every time there is a dry period. Shallow dug wells are more prone to issues during short term dry periods. Not saying a drilled well can’t go dry... but the majority of the issues are not with drilled wells.

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35 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

And wells are drying up because those same people who can't help but cut their lawn 3 times a week in a major drought are now dumping hundreds of gallons a day on their lawns in an attempt to save them. It really is a massively wasteful endeavor.

Lawns in general are very poor use of resources and environmentally do next to nothing.  Many cultures and other parts of the world do not understand our infatuation with lawns.  Leaving it as a field naturally is much better for the health of the local environment, or use it as a space to grow food... the lawn is certainly a product of suburban developments.

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3 minutes ago, greenmtnwx said:

I understand what you are saying but you seem overly harsh on people maintaining their lawns. It may not be important to you but to a lot of people it is. Just like planting and watering flowers, landscape, shrubbery, home maintenance, curb appeal, etc. it’s important to people who value their home, properties, appearance, value, etc. There are times when nature calls for cutting back to conserve, but that is hardly ever the case in this area and pride in people’s homes and the curb appeal has always been important to many just as other things in life may be to others. 

And many cities/towns have watering restrictions which limit the amount of watering that can be done. I know people who have had their wells run dry  and they have not been watering their lawns. I also know a few people who are having water delivered to preserve their wells.  A lot of people do take great pride in their property/home. As you know repairing extensive lawn damage can be expensive. And even in the best of situations it may not work all that well. I agree with you on it being important to some people. 

 

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4 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Lawns in general are very poor use of resources and environmentally do next to nothing.  Many cultures and other parts of the world do not understand our infatuation with lawns.  Leaving it as a field naturally is much better for the health of the local environment, or use it as a space to grow food... the lawn is certainly a product of suburban developments.

My lawn is basically a field that I keep cut.  

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