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April 20-21 late season snow potential


Hoosier
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As of 7 am CDT, Kansas City had picked up 2.6" of snow. Additional snow has fallen since that time. As a result, today's snowfall could wind up being the largest daily snowfall this late in the season and it could also be Kansas City's biggest snowstorm this late in the season.

Existing records (April 10 or later):

Daily Snowfall: 2.7", April 20, 1992
Biggest Snowstorm: 2.8", April 20-21, 1992

Prior to the 1992 snowstorm:

Daily snowfall:

2.8", April 9, 1961
7.0", April 8, 1938 (occurred April 7-8, with a trace of snow on April 7 as rain changed to snow)

Biggest snowstorms so late in the season:

4.0", April 8-9, 1983
7.0", April 7-8, 1938

 

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5 minutes ago, donsutherland1 said:

As of 7 am CDT, Kansas City had picked up 2.6" of snow. Additional snow has fallen since that time. As a result, today's snowfall could wind up being the largest daily snowfall this late in the season and it could also be Kansas City's biggest snowstorm this late in the season.

Existing records (April 10 or later):

Daily Snowfall: 2.7", April 20, 1992
Biggest Snowstorm: 2.8", April 20-21, 1992

Prior to the 1992 snowstorm:

Daily snowfall:

2.8", April 9, 1961
7.0", April 8, 1938 (occurred April 7-8, with a trace of snow on April 7 as rain changed to snow)

Biggest snowstorms so late in the season:

4.0", April 8-9, 1983
7.0", April 7-8, 1938

 

prior to today Kansas City only received 12.0" for the season, and 2.7"+ would be their biggest snow.of the season.

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2 hours ago, SchaumburgStormer said:

zzzzz... 

Lots of hype for a cold FROPA. Seasonal trend of over amped medium range signals shall not be denied. 

Hope that doesn't extend to potential severe systems as well (mid-next week). Although, that trough as modeled ATTM (at least on the deterministic GFS and the one Euro run I looked at) is actually a little TOO amped for quality chase-type severe in this neck of the woods, so... :whistle:

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Really solid f-gen band, snowed hard enough here at LOT that we've been down around 1/2sm visibility and gotten a few tenths on the grass and car tops. Just wet roads and parking lot, though part of the sidewalk outside has a minor dusting.

The meso models (aside from the RGEM) and the Euro certainly did best with band placement. Main issue will be that the band is too transient to support any legit accums and impacts.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk

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2 hours ago, michsnowfreak said:

It is indeed a massive difference. Even Apr 15 to Apr 20 is a huge difference. 

 

In 130 years of record (since 1891) Toledo has seen a 1"+ snowfall only 4 times on or after April 20.

4.0" Apr 23-24, 2005

4.0" May 9, 1923

2.0" Apr 21, 1922

1.3" May 6-7, 1989 

 

In 140 years of record (since 1881) Detroit has seen a 1"+ snowfall only 8 times on or after April 20.

6.0" May 9, 1923

5.0" May 21-22, 1883

4.3" Apr 23-24, 2005

3.0" Apr 29, 1909

1.7" Apr 23-24, 1967

1.5" May 13, 1912

1.2" Apr 20, 1947

1.0" Apr 22, 1911

 

*Note. per newspaper reports Toledo saw 3" during the unprecedented May 21/22 1883 storm, but records did not yet exist. 

Regarding the 1883 event, there were reports of 10" depths across the northern Miami Valley in Ohio the day after.  Temperatures were at or slightly above freezing for most of it, so when you consider how much probably melted/compacted, some areas probably saw 15"-20" of snow from that.  An insane event 10 days outside of June.

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2 hours ago, Snownado said:

What is the criteria for an advisory for KIND ? Forecasting 1-3 and no advisory. 

3"-5" is the official criteria for a snow advisory at IND.  However, an advisory is something that is flexible, unlike a warning. It is more at the discretion of the forecaster based on impacts. For example, a 2" snow in November might warrant an advisory, based on being the first possibility of slick roads for the season. In this case, even if 3" falls, they may take into consideration warm pavement temps and not expecting hazardous road conditions to not issue an advisory.

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43 minutes ago, jbcmh81 said:

Regarding the 1883 event, there were reports of 10" depths across the northern Miami Valley in Ohio the day after.  Temperatures were at or slightly above freezing for most of it, so when you consider how much probably melted/compacted, some areas probably saw 15"-20" of snow from that.  An insane event 10 days outside of June.

that's incredible 

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1 hour ago, IWXwx said:

3"-5" is the official criteria for a snow advisory at IND.  However, an advisory is something that is flexible, unlike a warning. It is more at the discretion of the forecaster based on impacts. For example, a 2" snow in November might warrant an advisory, based on being the first possibility of slick roads for the season. In this case, even if 3" falls, they may take into consideration warm pavement temps and not expecting hazardous road conditions to not issue an advisory.

I would think a 2" snow this time of year would be more worthy of an advisory than Nov given how rare it is

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