michsnowfreak

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About michsnowfreak

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  • Four Letter Airport Code For Weather Obs (Such as KDCA)
    KDTW
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  • Location:
    Wyandotte, Michigan

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  1. February 2020 - 14.9" of snow While Feb was also a mild month, it did not place in the top 20. Also, numerous snowfalls were seen. From Feb 5-13th, 7 of the 9 days saw measurable snowfall, a parade of sorts, but despite a total fall of 8.2" in those 9 days, the depth never exceeded 4". The most potent snowstorm of the month hit on Feb 26th 2-6-20 waking up to a fresh 2" of sugary snow 2-7-20 snow showers took a break for some sun, with a fresh 3-inch blanket of white 2-9-20 a heavy band of snow moved through during the evening, dropping just under 2" of snow in 3 hours 2-13-20 after much of the 2-3" snowpack that had been in place for the past week melted, a fresh 2" accompanied a pre-Valentines arctic front 2-14-20 a frigid low of 4F finally dethroned the 7F on Nov 13th as coldest of the winter, but those would remain the only two single digit readings this season, a far cry from last winter 2-26-20 a late Feb snowstorm drops 5.5" of snow. The snow started wet and plastering, but ended as the driftiest snow of the season 2-27-20 winter wonderland after 5.5" snowfall March 2020 - 1.8" of snow March was the 15th warmest March on record (so to recap 13th coldest Nov, 18th warmest Dec, 12th warmest Jan, 15th warmest Mar) and the only measurable snowfall was on the 22nd/23rd. 3-1-20 still a good drifty snowpack left, but it melted rapidly during the afternoon 3-22-20 very scenic wet snow 3-23-20 melting of the previous nights 1.8" snowfall was well underway when a burst of huge snowflakes fell WINTER TOTAL SNOWFALL (Wyandotte, MI) 2019-20: 38.3" THRU APR 3 2018-19: 31.9" 2017-18: 62.5" 2016-17: 41.6" 2015-16: 35.0" 2014-15: 48.5" 2013-14: 96.2" 2012-13: 47.9" 2011-12: 25.5" 2010-11: 69.4" 2009-10: 46.1" 2008-09: 64.8" 2007-08: 78.2" 2006-07: 36.6" 2005-06: 41.9" 2004-05: 80.7" 2003-04: 36.6" 2002-03: 66.9" 2001-02: 42.5" 2000-01: 47.3" 1999-00: 29.3" 1998-99: 52.1" 1997-98: 27.2" 1996-97: 35.9" 1995-96: 31.3"
  2. December 2019 - 2.6" of snow Nov and Dec apparently switched this year. December saw only a few very light snowfalls, in fact, half of the 2.6" fell New Years Eve (not pictured). It ended up being the 18th warmest December on record. In contrast to Novembers cold, December was only 0.7F colder than November. On average, December is 11.4F colder. 12-10-19 snow showers dusted the ground ahead of a quick cold snap 12-18-19 overnight snow showers dropped just under half an inch of powder January 2020 - 10.0" of snow The 12th warmest January on record did feature a few robust storms, including the largest January rainstorm on record (2 months to the day of the largest November snowstorm) and a snowstorm on the 18th. The month was steadily mild, but with no real warmth, and no cold lows (the coldest being 13F). 1-8-20 a 1" snowfall on the 7/8th was followed the next night by a starry night 1-12-20 a record Jan rainstorm (2.56") that began late on the 10th ended early on the 12th as 0.3" snow. The rain flash froze and everything was very icy 1-18-19 A heavy snowstorm dropped a quick 7" of snow before ending as rain. The snow froze up the next night. Total precip of the storm was 0.93" 1-19-20 a gray cold day, the snow which had been compacted froze up into a dense white crust 1-21-20 a bright winter day. These would be the last minutes of sun we would see until February 1-31-20 mild weather the last week of the month slowly melted the snow. This was the 10th day in a row of dark gray overcast
  3. Ive been doing this 2003 on weather boards. In the boards hey day it was quite a popular post lol. I still like to do one every year. Winter 2019-20 saw 38.4" of snow imby (thru Apr 3). DTW had 38.3". After Detroit saw the largest November snowstorm on record, the earliest single digit temp on record, and the 13th coldest November on record, we followed with the 9th warmest winter on record. Overall a winter of frustration but not without several good snowstorms. Three decent storms hit (8.8", 7.0", and 5.5") and much of the seasons snow had a high water content, with the only true period of fluffy snow being in early Feb. October 2019 - Trace of snow Wind-driven rain turned to snow Halloween night, with no accumulation. November 2019 - 9.1" of snow The first half of Nov was the 2nd coldest on record, behind only 1880, and saw a 9.2" snowstorm on Nov 11-12 become the largest Nov snowstorm on record for Detroit (old record 9.0"). I saw 8.8" with that storm. The scenes were surreal with some trees clinging to late color. A record low of 7F on the 13th was the earliest single digit low on record, and a solid blanket of snow remained on the ground for 9 days, fully melting on the 12th day. 11-7-19 heavy snow squalls drop 0.2", the first measurable snow of the season 11-11-19 heavy snow drops an unprecedented amount of snow for so early in the season 11-12-19 - beautiful scenes and record cold follow snowstorm which dumped 8.8" of snow imby and 9.2" at Detroit, 11-14-19 a light dusting of snow falls but the deep winter wonderland is still in place with record mid-Nov cold 11-16-19 still plenty of snow in place for the Wyandotte Christmas parade. The ground would go bare Nov 21.
  4. Lol basically as I said above, I spend alot of time outdoors in the Winter enjoying the snow. Spring is the season that I wish I could enjoy the outdoors but my allergies hate me. Normally it's something to deal with, but now every little throat scratch I would get I would be questioning relatedness to the plague.
  5. I will go outside for a walk in the neighborhood to get some fresh air, but that's about it. Maybe a park in the woods away from people. I took a walk during the March 22nd snowfall, you know snow can never keep me indoors lol. Since then I've taken a few walks as I love being outdoors however now a new component is here, allergy season. Obviously spring allergies starting are just an annoyance compared to the disaster that is covid19, but for my own sanity I don't want to aggravate any symptoms that are going to get me worrying lol.
  6. Yes, however with social distance thing I'm literally not going out in public. I did go to the grocery store last week with a turtleneck sweater pulled over my mouth lol, wearing gloves, and sanitizing the stuff when I brought it home. Other than that I'm going nowhere. Im fortunate to be able to work from home every day. I do always keep sanitizer my car anyway, but I'm not even driving anywhere now. I do tend wash my hands extra. When I need more groceries I plan to order online.
  7. I posted this in the Corona virus thread in the New England forum, like most of their threads, it's a very long one lol. But it's worthwhile to post in here. Food for thought on areas that are not taking it seriously yet, one person mentioning West Michigan. Those areas where covid is still relatively sparse probably have that "it cant happen to me" mindset. They start taking it seriously when it becomes imminent, ie, when it's too late. Michigan's covid is very heavily concentrated in metro Detroit, but that's because about half of the state's 10 million people are clustered in Southeast Michigan. That does not mean that more rural areas should take it as a free pass, because it is still there, only in far lesser numbers, and they also have less medical facilities. I literally have not left my house, but from everything I'm seeing on social media, Southeast Michigan is taking it quite seriously for the most part. Metro Detroit freeways are wide open during rush hour. Social media is inundated with real stories of this virus so it's pretty much impossible not to see it and take it seriously. Restaurants that are still open for take out are shipping food and treats to area hospitals, people are putting out white ribbons to support medical staff, etc. The good of humanity is showing through as best as it can during the darkest times.
  8. https://www.mlive.com/public-interest/2020/04/can-hydroxychloroquine-prevent-coronavirus-new-trial-will-test-3k-healthy-first-responders-in-michigan.html
  9. It is a disturbing trend that is probably everywhere. Those areas where covid is still relatively sparse probably have that "it cant happen to me" mindset. They start taking it seriously when it becomes imminent, ie, when it's too late. Michigan's covid is very heavily concentrated in metro Detroit, but that's because about half of the state's 10 million people are clustered in Southeast Michigan. That does not mean that more rural areas should take it as a free pass, because it is still there, only in far lesser numbers, and they also have less medical facilities. I literally have not left my house, but from everything I'm seeing on social media, Southeast Michigan is taking it quite seriously for the most part. Metro Detroit freeways are wide open during rush hour. Social media is inundated with real stories of this virus so it's pretty much impossible not to see it and take it seriously. Restaurants that are still open for take out are shipping food and treats to area hospitals, people are putting out white ribbons to support medical staff, etc. The good of humanity is showing through as best as it can during the darkest times.
  10. My cousin who is a nurse posted this on Facebook. Honestly, of course I'm getting antsy staying at home all the time, but staying home will eventually save lives. "The look of sheer panic and fear in someone’s eyes as they’re struggling to breathe because of the fluid in their lungs is basically making them drown, makes my heart drop to the ****in pit of my stomach"
  11. My cousin who is a nurse posted this on Facebook. Honestly, of course I'm getting antsy staying at home all the time, but staying home will eventually save lives. "The look of sheer panic and fear in someone’s eyes as they’re struggling to breathe because of the fluid in their lungs is basically making them drown, makes my heart drop to the ****in pit of my stomach"
  12. It does seem like the New England forum has the most amount of posters. The Lakes forum is also a tight knit close group, just smaller in number. Regardless, this thread has been quite informational, along with the one in the lakes, during this sick pandemic.
  13. The city of Detroit has definitely had a higher percentage of cases and death, but it is spreading to the entire metro area. They are turning to TFC center (aka cobo hall) into a 900 bed emergency covid hospital. Looking at a city by city breakdown of the burbs there are definitely some hotter spots than others, but its everywhere.
  14. From ne forum Great interview on CNBC, Dr. Gottlieb given hope that we will be out of this soon.. basic timing, which I think is spot on April - Rough month May - Transition (post peak) June - Start to open things up again July - August - Mostly back to normal but putting out hot spots and preparing for the fall Fall 2020 - Likely see hot spots but we are ready and don't need to take drastic actions and also we have more therapies available.