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Indiana recently added something nice to the dashboard.  There is a breakdown of the number of unique individuals tested as well as the total number of tests each day so you get a sense of how many multiple tests have been done. 

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1 hour ago, BuffaloWeather said:

I had posted the same link. I think it’s big news that I’m surprised isn’t getting more attention. The theory being many people may already have immunity to Covid from T-cell cross reactivity. I’m not sure immunity is the correct term, though, since a person can still contract / spread the virus. It’s just they are either asymptomatic or have just mild symptoms. As stated in the study, most people have been exposed to other coronaviruses already in their lifetimes. Even though Covid-19 is new, it still shares similar qualities with its family of other coronaviruses, thus those bodies previously infected with these other coronaviruses are better able to defend themselves against Covid-19.

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Just now, ovweather said:

I had posted the same link. I think it’s big news that I’m surprised isn’t getting more attention. The theory being many people may already have immunity to Covid from T-cell cross reactivity. I’m not sure immunity is the correct term, though, since a person can still contract / spread the virus. It’s just they are either asymptomatic or have just mild symptoms. As stated in the study, most people have been exposed to other coronaviruses already in their lifetimes. Even though Covid-19 is new, it still shares similar pathogens with its family of other coronaviruses thus those bodies previously infected with these other coronaviruses, are better able to defend themselves against Covid-19.

My bad, didn't see. I deleted it. It would explain quite a bit in how places are nearly fully open in hard hit states for 2 months without an increase in cases. One could conclude that it is making its way across the country. 

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41 minutes ago, BuffaloWeather said:

My bad, didn't see. I deleted it. It would explain quite a bit in how places are nearly fully open in hard hit states for 2 months without an increase in cases. One could conclude that it is making its way across the country. 

Plus, researchers believe that in some high-population areas that have already been hit hard, that as many as 25 times as many people (who tested positive) may have already had the virus. Lots of asymptomatic and very mild case people haven't even been tested or had an antibody test (which are said not to be highly accurate).

Obviously the virus is still very serious and thus needs to continue be taken seriously. But the reality is many of those very sick and dying have a combination of things working against them. They are either weak and elderly, smokers, diabetic, obese, or a combination of these and other factors. I have to wonder if those "perfectly healthy" individuals who fell very sick with the virus don't have a genetic disposition of some kind to coronaviruses where it affects them more severely than others? Kind of like how some people are miserable with just a common cold while others feel very little. There are just so many variables at play, so until we understand them all, the best approach is still to social distance and wear a face mask.

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The places that were hammered in winter/spring generally took a slower approach with reopening.  Forget the bars, is indoor dining even open yet in NYC?  Or if it is, what's the percent capacity?

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41 minutes ago, Inverted_Trough said:

I think this quote from the first article sums it up:

Still, Taylor-Cousar cautions that researchers are studying the new coronavirus more intensively than they've studied other respiratory ailments. "Usually if someone is asymptomatic [with a common cold or flu virus], we would never even see them at all," she says, "and we would never think to get a CT scan on them." So there's no comparable data to say whether the lung abnormalities are specific to asymptomatic coronavirus carriers, or common among respiratory viruses.”

In other words, is lung inflammation / damage specific to asymptomatic Covid patients or a common side effect of many viruses?

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2 hours ago, BuffaloWeather said:

My bad, didn't see. I deleted it. It would explain quite a bit in how places are nearly fully open in hard hit states for 2 months without an increase in cases. One could conclude that it is making its way across the country. 

I suppose it’s why southern states could be having a hard time.  I’d imagine colds and other Coronaviruses in general would be at least a tad more common in cold weather states (states like Arizona are probably pretty low in that regard due to warm, dry weather).

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47 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

The places that were hammered in winter/spring generally took a slower approach with reopening.  Forget the bars, is indoor dining even open yet in NYC?  Or if it is, what's the percent capacity?

Bingo. Main difference.

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1 hour ago, Hoosier said:

The places that were hammered in winter/spring generally took a slower approach with reopening.  Forget the bars, is indoor dining even open yet in NYC?  Or if it is, what's the percent capacity?

Everything has been opened for awhile here in New York. Indoor dining has been open with no spikes. I think it has to do with mask wearing here. It's extemely rare to see someone not use one. I went to a restaurant yesterday and it was so organized. 6 feet apart to order, everyone wearing a mask inside and outside. Even going for a walk along the water people were conscious to stay 6 feet apart walking by.

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9 minutes ago, BuffaloWeather said:

Everything has been opened for awhile here in New York. Indoor dining has been open with no spikes. I think it has to do with mask wearing here. It's extemely rare to see someone not use one. I went to a restaurant yesterday and it was so organized. 6 feet apart to order, everyone wearing a mask inside and outside. Even going for a walk along the water people were conscious to stay 6 feet apart walking by.

What about New York City specifically?  I know they were not doing indoor dining as of 3 or 4 weeks ago but not sure if something changed.

Limited indoor dining seems like it can work.  The bigger problem comes when you increase the capacity toward 75-100% and of course the bars are ripe for spreading.

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1 hour ago, ovweather said:

In other words, is lung inflammation / damage specific to asymptomatic Covid patients or a common side effect of many viruses?

Not sure.  But lung damage is very uncommon in symptomatic cold and flu patients, unless it turns into a pneumonia.  

My main point was that it seems people conflate asymptomatic = benign.  I don't think that's necessarily the case.  What made HIV so scary back in the 1980s was that so many people were asymptomatic until they basically got full blown AIDS.  There are some cancers that are asymptomatic until you get to Stage 3 or Stage 4 -- that's what makes pancreatic cancer so deadly...by the time symptoms arise, you're often already at Stage 4.  To me, something that's damaging my body without causing symptoms, that's far more insidious.  I just think we have to be careful with how we interpret asymptomatic cases.  It's not clear whether all those cases are benign at this point.

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2 hours ago, Inverted_Trough said:

Not sure.  But lung damage is very uncommon in symptomatic cold and flu patients, unless it turns into a pneumonia.  

My main point was that it seems people conflate asymptomatic = benign.  I don't think that's necessarily the case.  What made HIV so scary back in the 1980s was that so many people were asymptomatic until they basically got full blown AIDS.  There are some cancers that are asymptomatic until you get to Stage 3 or Stage 4 -- that's what makes pancreatic cancer so deadly...by the time symptoms arise, you're often already at Stage 4.  To me, something that's damaging my body without causing symptoms, that's far more insidious.  I just think we have to be careful with how we interpret asymptomatic cases.  It's not clear whether all those cases are benign at this point.

Also, how can doctors be sure a patient is asymptomatic or just not being completely honest about how they're feeling, maybe out of fear or denial? I know, a bit of irrational thinking, but being asymptomatic is only reliable for research if a person is being completely honest and not trying to hide symptoms out of fear.

It's also important to distinguish between lung inflammation and lung damage. I had a nasty case of bacterial pneumonia in both my lungs 16 years ago. The pneumonia led to pleurisy in both lungs. No doubt I had serious lung inflammation, but 4.5 months after the illness I was back to running long distances with no lung deterioration. In fact, other than some slight scarring from the pleurisy that caused very mild discomfort in my right lung for up to a few years, my lung (and heart) function was normal. When I think of lung damage, I think of smokers and those breathing in toxic amounts of chemicals or air pollutants regularly. We simply have no way of determining right now if Covid patients are suffering long term lung damage or if it's just short term inflammation. And if any damage is occurring along side preexisting lung issues from smoking to pollutants, etc. It will take years to research and understand any long term damage.

The bottom line again is playing it safe until we understand far better what Covid is doing, or if what we are seeing in asymptomatic people is common with other coronaviruses but just never researched as extensively as Covid-19 is being (as the articles you posted state).

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4 hours ago, Hoosier said:

What about New York City specifically?  I know they were not doing indoor dining as of 3 or 4 weeks ago but not sure if something changed.

Limited indoor dining seems like it can work.  The bigger problem comes when you increase the capacity toward 75-100% and of course the bars are ripe for spreading.

I believe NY is at 50% capacity as of 2 weeks ago. I'm not sure if we will see the full effects for a little bit of that. Gyms, movie theatres, concerts, and sporting events are still not happening. Everything else is going and bars and restaurants are packed outside. The real test is when the temperatures start cooling down in 1-2 months. I think we have a tough time here in winter if kids go back to school especially.

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19 minutes ago, ovweather said:

Also, how can doctors be sure a patient is asymptomatic or just not being completely honest about how they're feeling, maybe out of fear or denial? I know, a bit of irrational thinking, but being asymptomatic is only reliable for research if a person is being completely honest and not trying to hide symptoms out of fear.

It's also important to distinguish between lung inflammation and lung damage. I had a nasty case of bacterial pneumonia in both my lungs 16 years ago. The pneumonia led to pleurisy in both lungs. No doubt I had serious lung inflammation, but 4.5 months after the illness I was back to running long distances with no lung deterioration. In fact, other than some slight scarring from the pleurisy that caused very mild discomfort in my right lung for up to a few years, my lung (and heart) function was normal. When I think of lung damage, I think of smokers and those breathing in toxic amounts of chemicals or air pollutants regularly. We simply have no way of determining right now if Covid patients are suffering long term lung damage or if it's just short term inflammation. And if any damage is occurring along side preexisting lung issues from smoking to pollutants, etc. It will take years to research and understand any long term damage.

The bottom line again is playing it safe until we understand far better what Covid is doing, or if what we are seeing in asymptomatic people is common with other coronaviruses but just never researched as extensively as Covid-19 is being (as the articles you posted state).

I mean what symptoms can't be found through a simple examination for covid? Other than nausea most things can be visually seen or taken measurement.

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This is a little foreboding as schools are getting ready to return.  No, it's not the same thing as a school, but the number of people that caught the virus in that short amount of time is shocking.

 

Hundreds of Georgia campers infected with coronavirus at YMCA camp in just days, CDC report finds

https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/hundreds-georgia-campers-infected-with-coronavirus-ymca-summer-camp-cdc-report-finds/EL5FFTVSDVETRGROPEXK6CIZNM/?outputType=amp

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28 minutes ago, Stebo said:

I mean what symptoms can't be found through a simple examination for covid? Other than nausea most things can be visually seen or taken measurement.

But how many people testing positive are getting examinations by doctors or nurses? Because of the overload of positive cases, a lot of the asymptomatic and mild symptom people aren’t even being examined by a doctor. They are simply being asked over the phone how they feel.

For accurate research purposes, especially when trying to determine possible lung damage in supposably asymptomatic people, they will need to be thoroughly examined upon testing positive to fully determine if they truly are asymptomatic. It will also be very beneficial to give all asymptomatic people CT scans of the lungs upon a positive test for Covid to get a picture of the lungs at the onset of the virus in their bodies.

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3 minutes ago, ovweather said:

But how many people testing positive are getting examinations by doctors or nurses? Because of the overload of positive cases, a lot of the asymptomatic and mild symptom people aren’t even being examined by a doctor. They are simply being asked over the phone how they feel.

For accurate research purposes, especially when trying to determine possible lung damage in supposably asymptomatic people, they will need to be thoroughly examined upon testing positive to fully determine if they truly are asymptomatic. It will also be very beneficial to give all asymptomatic people CT scans of the lungs upon a positive test for Covid to get a picture of the lungs at the onset of the virus in their bodies.

If they are testing positive though they aren't going to be hiding it. I mean if someone tests positive and doesn't take any precautions they are doing so at their own risk.

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7 hours ago, Stebo said:

If they are testing positive though they aren't going to be hiding it. I mean if someone tests positive and doesn't take any precautions they are doing so at their own risk.

Asymptomatic vs. symptomatic is subjective. The tolerance for symptoms in people is heterogeneous. It seems though that you can still see changes in the lungs for a lot of these people who aren't felling symptoms. 

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This is a little foreboding as schools are getting ready to return.  No, it's not the same thing as a school, but the number of people that caught the virus in that short amount of time is shocking.
 

Hundreds of Georgia campers infected with coronavirus at YMCA camp in just days, CDC report finds

https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/hundreds-georgia-campers-infected-with-coronavirus-ymca-summer-camp-cdc-report-finds/EL5FFTVSDVETRGROPEXK6CIZNM/?outputType=amp

Right. The fact that both the IHSAA and the OHSAA are going ahead with Fall Sports boggles my mind. Sure, have golf and cross country, but how the heck are you going to play football? Soccer? Do band and choir practice with a bunch of people singing and playing instruments.

Spikes alone are going to come from this. And you know damn well that the HS football games will be packed attendance wise. Empty stadiums would bankrupt athletic departments

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Looks like this will be the first Saturday with 1000+ reported deaths since the end of May.

We will hit 200k in the first week of September at the rate we're going.

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We’re on a downward trend! Still the amount of people without masks stuns me here in SC, but it’s much better than it was in May. Maybe the incoming blob of a tropical system can blow it out of out here

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1 hour ago, nwohweather said:

We’re on a downward trend! Still the amount of people without masks stuns me here in SC, but it’s much better than it was in May. Maybe the incoming blob of a tropical system can blow it out of out here

Knowing this year it'll probably just blow the germs virus around more!

But seriously...this hurricane season combined with corona...I'm just thinking of people being in shelters and such. Yikes

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1 hour ago, BuffaloWeather said:

I guess we will see if there on any side effects to a vaccine pretty quickly. Leave it to Russia to bypass all medical research standards and go right into vaccinating everyone.

Coronavirus: Russia plans mass vaccination campaign in October

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-53621708

In Soviet Russia you don't get vaccine.  Vaccine get you!

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