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Extended summer stormlover74 future snow hole banter thread 23


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3 hours ago, JetsPens87 said:

2 things here...

 

First is an absolute LOL at him still refusing to give up on BN temps

Second is...where is that for and how is March 2012 not first?

I wonder how many clients he lost after this year's disaster...he missed temps 5-7 degrees....that's astounding.  Worse he doubled down in early Feb when he should have thrown in the towel at that point...

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I'm sure the NY Mets organization contracts a meteorological company.  So what were they looking at yesterday?  Sure, the rain was going to slacken off a bit after 8 PM last night, but the game was scheduled for 7:05 PM.  Even if it stopped raining completely, there were going to be sporadic showers, after it rained all day.  I understand that they are playing an unbalanced scheduled, where they won't be playig Detroit again this season, but you must consider fans that are driving from 2.5 hours away (albeit 35 miles).  This isn't the first time this organization screwed the fans.  By noon, they should have at least issued a statement that any fan with tickets not coming to last night's game will be refunded (regardless if the game is played or not).  Instead, they held the ticket holders hostage, I guess to pay for their $30+ million dollar a year shortshop?  Disgraceful.  Do they refund the ridiculous parking fees?

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1 hour ago, Dark Star said:

I'm sure the NY Mets organization contracts a meteorological company.  So what were they looking at yesterday?  Sure, the rain was going to slacken off a bit after 8 PM last night, but the game was scheduled for 7:05 PM.  Even if it stopped raining completely, there were going to be sporadic showers, after it rained all day.  I understand that they are playing an unbalanced scheduled, where they won't be playig Detroit again this season, but you must consider fans that are driving from 2.5 hours away (albeit 35 miles).  This isn't the first time this organization screwed the fans.  By noon, they should have at least issued a statement that any fan with tickets not coming to last night's game will be refunded (regardless if the game is played or not).  Instead, they held the ticket holders hostage, I guess to pay for their $30+ million dollar a year shortshop?  Disgraceful.  Do they refund the ridiculous parking fees?

Cohen had gone from a promising owner with some really strong plans to a greedy buffoon with zero strategy other than money grabbing in about 2 seasons.

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1 hour ago, Dark Star said:

I'm sure the NY Mets organization contracts a meteorological company.  So what were they looking at yesterday?  Sure, the rain was going to slacken off a bit after 8 PM last night, but the game was scheduled for 7:05 PM.  Even if it stopped raining completely, there were going to be sporadic showers, after it rained all day.  I understand that they are playing an unbalanced scheduled, where they won't be playig Detroit again this season, but you must consider fans that are driving from 2.5 hours away (albeit 35 miles).  This isn't the first time this organization screwed the fans.  By noon, they should have at least issued a statement that any fan with tickets not coming to last night's game will be refunded (regardless if the game is played or not).  Instead, they held the ticket holders hostage, I guess to pay for their $30+ million dollar a year shortshop?  Disgraceful.  Do they refund the ridiculous parking fees?

Shameful.    Zero chance the game would be played even as late as 5-6pm if you looked at radar...

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2 hours ago, Brian5671 said:

Shameful.    Zero chance the game would be played even as late as 5-6pm if you looked at radar...

Yeah they should have postponed before the game, but what I found ridiculous was they made people wait 2 hours and then called the game just as the rain was ending around 9pm. If you make people wait that long, then why call it just as you were getting into a dry window? The way the whole thing was handled was a disgrace. 

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11 minutes ago, winterwx21 said:

Yeah they should have postponed before the game, but what I found ridiculous was they made people wait 2 hours and then called the game just as the rain was ending around 9pm. If you make people wait that long, then why call it just as you were getting into a dry window? The way the whole thing was handled was a disgrace. 

Tonight's call should be a bit easier....:arrowhead:

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On 4/3/2024 at 12:56 PM, winterwx21 said:

Yeah they should have postponed before the game, but what I found ridiculous was they made people wait 2 hours and then called the game just as the rain was ending around 9pm. If you make people wait that long, then why call it just as you were getting into a dry window? The way the whole thing was handled was a disgrace. 

MLB needs to make removable roofs mandatory for EVERY stadium.

Rain outs and rain delays should be a thing of the past.

 

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Nothing like starting your day with a lovely intraplate mag 4.8 quake. Shook Hillside pretty good! 

Lots of ancient buried and inactive faults around the fall line from when we were stapled into Pangea. They can occasionally still groan and shift enough to produce quakes like this, though they aren’t super common. Pretty cool!

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4 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

hell no this was a lot stronger than that

I remember the 5.8 from August 2011, this was MUCH stronger

That quake was in Virginia. We were much more proximal to this quake. 

Ascertaining the exact epicenter, magnitude, and depth is somewhat inexact and gets refined when data is reviewed after the fact. 

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1 minute ago, Volcanic Winter said:

That quake was in Virginia. We were much more proximal to this quake. 

Can we find a connection between these and heavy rainfalls that happened just prior?  August 2011 was a very rainy month.  We've been in a very rainy pattern now too.

I remember reading scientific papers linking heavy rainfalls and earthquakes-- is it a possibility?

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9 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

Can we find a connection between these and heavy rainfalls that happened just prior?  August 2011 was a very rainy month.  We've been in a very rainy pattern now too.

I remember reading scientific papers linking heavy rainfalls and earthquakes-- is it a possibility?

I’m not super well versed in all that, the majority of what I study about earthquakes are in relation to volcanoes. 

I do think that sounds plausible, an over abundance of ground water saturating those deep inactive faults and possibly lubricating or shifting the mass balance enough to slip a bit? Sure, sounds plausible but I can’t really comment further. 

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On 3/26/2024 at 3:27 PM, donsutherland1 said:

In his A Winter Season, James Fisher wrote December in Edinburgh in the early 19th century:

In midst of dark December's howling blast, out from his quarters in the frigid zone comes surly Winter, in his car of iron, drawn on by furious, foaming, snow-white steeds, escorted by his angry northern band; which raves, and roars, and rages all around despoiling Nature of her every charm; and now sits down to storm her empire all… Falling rapidly, drifting on heaps, are the flakes of now, while the boisterous wind, roaring furiously, disbranches the trees, and threatens to overturn every habitation of man. To heighten the terrific scene... what a flash of lightning, followed by a tremendously loud clap of thunder!

A lot of that could have applied to December in New York City during its first 30 years of record (1869-1898). December is now increasingly taking on the character of late November. The changes have been so dramatic that January today (1995-2024) is almost identical to what December was like during New York City’s first 30 years of recordkeeping.

image.png.7207d53e7ce0ee3c2b8088dce100ba3a.png

Good post, Don. Even more striking when you look at the values observed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Fort Columbus [later known as Fort Jay] on Governor's Island, south of Manhattan, from 1821-1854. In that stretch of 34 Decembers, only 2 had a mean temperature in excess of the current normal (41.3, 1829; and 40.4F, 1852). One other year (1848) had a mean right on par with the current normal of 39.3F. While the proximity to water could lead to some cooling in the spring and summer, relative to Central Park, I would assume the proximity to water would lead this site to be warmer in the cold season.

image.png.3db6a9e3b91b1c36517f606ce2a82f60.png

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5 minutes ago, Volcanic Winter said:

I’m not super well versed in all that, the majority of what I study about earthquakes are in relation to volcanoes. 

I do think that sounds plausible, an over abundance of ground water saturating those deep inactive faults and possibly lubricating or shifting the mass balance enough to slip a bit? Sure, sounds plausible but I can’t really comment further. 

I remember reading this happens around fracking sites because of wastewater injection =\

One of the many reasons fracking was banned in our state.

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3 minutes ago, TheClimateChanger said:

Good post, Don. Even more striking when you look at the values observed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Fort Columbus [later known as Fort Jay] on Governor's Island, south of Manhattan, from 1821-1854. In that stretch of 34 Decembers, only 2 had a mean temperature in excess of the current normal (41.3, 1829; and 40.4F, 1852). One other year (1848) had a mean right on par with the current normal of 39.3F. While the proximity to water could lead to some cooling in the spring and summer, relative to Central Park, I would assume the proximity to water would lead this site to be warmer in the cold season.

image.png.3db6a9e3b91b1c36517f606ce2a82f60.png

On average, I think we can surmise that the mid 19th century climate of New York would have been comparable to that of present-day Albany, about 135 miles to the north (according to Wikipedia). It's still slightly warmer than recent years at KALB, but the airport is at nearly 300' elevation, while the bulk of the city of Albany is only around 100' elevation.

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6 minutes ago, TheClimateChanger said:

Good post, Don. Even more striking when you look at the values observed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Fort Columbus [later known as Fort Jay] on Governor's Island, south of Manhattan, from 1821-1854. In that stretch of 34 Decembers, only 2 had a mean temperature in excess of the current normal (41.3, 1829; and 40.4F, 1852). One other year (1848) had a mean right on par with the current normal of 39.3F. While the proximity to water could lead to some cooling in the spring and summer, relative to Central Park, I would assume the proximity to water would lead this site to be warmer in the cold season.

image.png.3db6a9e3b91b1c36517f606ce2a82f60.png

That 47.6F in 1836 is very interesting. I've read in numerous sources of a "great refrigeration" that occurred from about 1835-1838 on par with that of 1816. There was reportedly 2" of snow in Guangzhou [Canton], China in February 1835, suggesting it very well could have been a global [or at least hemisphere-wide] phenomenon.

Berkeley Earth blames it on Cosiguina, which erupted in January 1835, and says there was a global land average temperature drop of 0.75C. However, it doesn't seem strong enough to me for that degree of response.

Cosigüina - Wikipedia

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9 minutes ago, TheClimateChanger said:

Good post, Don. Even more striking when you look at the values observed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps at Fort Columbus [later known as Fort Jay] on Governor's Island, south of Manhattan, from 1821-1854. In that stretch of 34 Decembers, only 2 had a mean temperature in excess of the current normal (41.3, 1829; and 40.4F, 1852). One other year (1848) had a mean right on par with the current normal of 39.3F. While the proximity to water could lead to some cooling in the spring and summer, relative to Central Park, I would assume the proximity to water would lead this site to be warmer in the cold season.

image.png.3db6a9e3b91b1c36517f606ce2a82f60.png

Great information. Yes, the water almost certainly moderated the overall figures. Now, what was unusual warmth is becoming the norm as the climate continues to warm.

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4 minutes ago, TheClimateChanger said:

That 47.6F in 1836 is very interesting. I've read in numerous sources of a "great refrigeration" that occurred from about 1835-1838 on par with that of 1816. There was reportedly 2" of snow in Guangzhou [Canton], China in February 1835, suggesting it very well could have been a global [or at least hemisphere-wide] phenomenon.

Berkeley Earth blames it on Cosiguina, which erupted in January 1835, and says there was a global land average temperature drop of 0.75C. However, it doesn't seem strong enough to me for that degree of response.

Cosigüina - Wikipedia

Interestingly, Volcano Osorno apparently erupted in Chile one day prior to the big Cosiguina eruption in Nicaragua. Charles Darwin also believed there was an eruption of Aconcagua, but that's an extinct paleovolcano. Perhaps there was a third eruption in Argentina? Or he just lost his bearings and actually witnessed the eruptions of Osorno and Cosiguina?

image.png.56af1d62227c75a9e21282827256e41b.png

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46 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

this was the most violent shaking I have ever felt and it lasted a long time

Good morning Liberty. I must be really old if I can’t even feel the ground shake. As always …

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