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August 2021


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57 minutes ago, bluewave said:

Yeah, today is the 36th day to reach 90° at Newark. The airport finished the season with 45.7” of snow. So this could only be the 2nd time on record along with 2010 to reach 40” of snow and 40 days of 90°.
 

Time Series Summary for NEWARK LIBERTY INTL AP, NJ - Jan through Dec
Click column heading to sort ascending, click again to sort descending.
Rank
Year
Number of Days Max Temperature >= 90 
Snowfall
1 2010 54 47.9
2 1993 49 28.8
3 1988 43 22.8
4 2002 41 3.6
- 1991 41 21.5
5 2016 40 32.8
- 1983 40 31.0
- 1959 40 17.8

the good old days!  lots of snow in the winter and lots of heat in the summer!

didn't we have the same at LGA though in 2010?

 

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58 minutes ago, bluewave said:

Yeah, today is the 36th day to reach 90° at Newark. The airport finished the season with 45.7” of snow. So this could only be the 2nd time on record along with 2010 to reach 40” of snow and 40 days of 90°.
 

Time Series Summary for NEWARK LIBERTY INTL AP, NJ - Jan through Dec
Click column heading to sort ascending, click again to sort descending.
Rank
Year
Number of Days Max Temperature >= 90 
Snowfall
1 2010 54 47.9
2 1993 49 28.8
3 1988 43 22.8
4 2002 41 3.6
- 1991 41 21.5
5 2016 40 32.8
- 1983 40 31.0
- 1959 40 17.8

this is the list of what I would call the truly hot summers

2010, 1993, 2002, 1991, 1983

missing a few (1944, 1955, 1966, 1980, 1995, 1999)

 

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2 hours ago, LibertyBell said:

what the heck happened in 1913 lol

 

it was a developing el nino year with hardly any snow Jan and Feb but 40" in Feb and Mar...mid feb 1914 to the first week in March ranks with the greatest winter periods of all time...

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8 minutes ago, donsutherland1 said:

That may have been a cold core storm that developed a warm core along its unusual path.

Yeah, looks like a weaker and further SW version of the 1991 perfect storm.

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33 minutes ago, dmillz25 said:

Im dreading this 

The dew points have already begun to rise here on the South Shore. JFK is on track for its first six year stretch of 50 days with 70°+ dew points.

2F9AF499-24B4-4A72-9C58-49B124773E1F.thumb.jpeg.e33d04d2d7a81545000d69226596fa04.jpeg

 

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Much of the region saw temperatures rise into the upper 80s and lower 90s.

90° Days for Select Cities (through August 24):

Albany: 4 (2020: 13 days; 5-Year Average: 13.6 days)
Allentown: 21 (2020: 24 days; 5-Year Average: 27.6 days)
Baltimore: 45 (2020: 46 days; 5-Year Average: 44.6 days)
Boston: 21 (2020: 14 days; 5-Year Average: 17.2 days)
Bridgeport: 10 (2020: 11 days; 5-Year Average: 13.4 days)
Burlington: 12 (2020: 20 days; 5-Year Average: 13.0 days)
Harrisburg: 31 (2020: 35 days; 5-Year Average: 30.6 days)
Hartford: 21 (2020: 39 days; 5-Year Average: 29.0 days)
Islip: 6 (2020: 8 days; 5-Year Average: 9.4 days)
New York City-JFK: 9 (2020: 12 days; 5-Year Average: 10.2 days)
New York City-LGA: 22 (2020: 34 days; 5-Year Average: 29.4 days)
New York City-NYC: 14 (2020: 20 days; 5-Year Average: 18.2 days)
Newark: 36 (2020: 33 days; 5-Year Average: 31.2 days)
Philadelphia: 32 (2020: 36 days; 5-Year Average: 34.6 days)
Scranton: 16 (2020: 25 days; 5-Year Average: 16.4 days)
Washington, DC: 41 (2020: 46 days; 5-Year Average: 50.8 days)

New York City-Newark Average: 20 (2020: 22 days)
...Expected: 22 (based on regression equation tied to JFK-LGA-EWR data)

Tomorrow could be a degree or two warmer. In addition, the humidity will begin to increase. Much of the remainder of this week will feature unseasonably warm temperatures.

The ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly was -0.1°C and the Region 3.4 anomaly was -0.9°C for the week centered around August 18. For the past six weeks, the ENSO Region 1+2 anomaly has averaged +0.41°C and the ENSO Region 3.4 anomaly has averaged -0.43°C. Neutral ENSO conditions will likely prevail into mid-September. Afterward, La Niña could begin to develop.

The SOI was +12.20 today.

The preliminary Arctic Oscillation (AO) figure was -0.976 today.

On August 22 the MJO was in Phase 2 at an amplitude of 0.675 (RMM). The August 21-adjusted amplitude was 0.962 (RMM).

Based on sensitivity analysis applied to the latest guidance, there is an implied 87% probability that New York City will have a warmer than normal August (1991-2020 normal). August will likely finish with a mean temperature near 77.3° (1.3° above normal).

 

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1 hour ago, gravitylover said:

A 3 week winter... kinda like the one we just went through, same timing too.

I wasn't alive in 1914 (hard to believe) but I was for the Jan 15-Feb 4, 1961 onslaught...1913-14 was like 1966-67 without the snowstorm for Christmas...

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2 hours ago, gravitylover said:

A 3 week winter... kinda like the one we just went through, same timing too.

one of a few winters that got at least 30" of snow in 30 days...

30" in 30 days...
The short list..............................Newark...
02/24-03/24, 1896.....32.0"......
02/06-03/07, 1914.....35.2"......2/13-3/14, 1914.....32.5"
12/26-01/24, 1948.....43.4"......12/26-1/24/48.......42.1"
01/15-02/13, 1961.....34.1"........1/15-2/13, 1961......44.8"
01/16-02/14, 1978.....37.2"........1/16-2/14, 1978.....44.9"
02/02-03/03, 1994.....30.8".....2/8-3/9, 1994........28.6"**est...
12/14-01/12, 1996.....35.2".......12/14/95-1/12/96...42.7"

...................................................1/20-2/18, 2003.....30.7"
01/28-02/26, 2010.....38.2".....1/28-2/26, 2010......34.0"
01/07-02/05, 2011.....37.6"......12/26-1/24, 2011.....42.1"

01/21-02/19, 2014.....42.1"......1/21-2/19, 2014.......41.7"

01/17-02/15, 2016.....31.5"......1/17-2/15, 2016.......30.9"

..................................................1/31-3/1, 2021.........32.1"...as of 2/21

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5 hours ago, bluewave said:

Today will probably be the lowest humidity of the heatwave as dew points are really high to our west.

a lot of building air systems are barely designed to handle the kind of dews we have been seeing the last few years.  among the billion things I do at my job, i review air handler specifications before i buy them, and 80F is basically the upper limit of the cooling coils we spec.  maybe there's some sensitive areas with even more robust design requirements but i haven't seen it.  this is for 100% outside air laboratory air handlers.  no recycling.  the office air handlers recycle air and so are design to mix, say, 50/50 recycled air and outside air.

last year due to COVID we went to a 100% outside air protocol for ALL air handlers, even for office areas that were simply not designed to do that.  rain in the building became a problem where moist air condensed on the cold surfaces of air diffusers and started to drip.  we looked like assholes to the users but it wasn't our fault.

as global warming continues its long march to the sea, we are going to spend more and more energy just trying to fend it off--another feedback loop of doom.

edit: i know that had little to do with your post but i spent all day sweating to death and, you know, i'm not looking forward to more of it.

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37 minutes ago, Will - Rutgers said:

a lot of building air systems are barely designed to handle the kind of dews we have been seeing the last few years.  among the billion things I do at my job, i review air handler specifications before i buy them, and 80F is basically the upper limit of the cooling coils we spec.  maybe there's some sensitive areas with even more robust design requirements but i haven't seen it.  this is for 100% outside air laboratory air handlers.  no recycling.  the office air handlers recycle air and so are design to mix, say, 50/50 recycled air and outside air.

last year due to COVID we went to a 100% outside air protocol for ALL air handlers, even for office areas that were simply not designed to do that.  rain in the building became a problem where moist air condensed on the cold surfaces of air diffusers and started to drip.  we looked like assholes to the users but it wasn't our fault.

as global warming continues its long march to the sea, we are going to spend more and more energy just trying to fend it off--another feedback loop of doom.

edit: i know that had little to do with your post but i spent all day sweating to death and, you know, i'm not looking forward to more of it.

Tell you what, with sea level rise happening, these ugly high dew points and droughts and wild fires in the West, I would seriously consider more efficient desalinization machines being built so we can use the water from the oceans.  It would be a muscular move to solve multiple problems at once- if we were able to use enough ocean water at a high enough rate we could solve our drought problems and negate sea level rise at the same time.  The question is how long it will be when we have machines powerful enough to desalinate water from the oceans and use it and take it out fast enough to negate sea level rise.

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