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Damage In Tolland

The 2020 Lesco & Lawn Thread

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12 hours ago, DavisStraight said:

Honey locust and black locust are great firewood. Not many if either in my area.

Black locust is also quite rot resistant; don't know if honey locust is similar.  Black locust can also become an invasive in the Northeast, outside its native range, spreading mostly by root sprouts.  And despite its spreading roots, a lot blew down when Bob came thru, whether due to weak roots or crowns atop a long lever arm I can't say.  (Crummy color in fall, too.)

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15 hours ago, tamarack said:

Black locust is also quite rot resistant; don't know if honey locust is similar.  Black locust can also become an invasive in the Northeast, outside its native range, spreading mostly by root sprouts.  And despite its spreading roots, a lot blew down when Bob came thru, whether due to weak roots or crowns atop a long lever arm I can't say.  (Crummy color in fall, too.)

Tossed. 

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This time last year from the bottom of the image out was all thick woods. Made the decision earlier this year to stretch it out. Been fighting with the late winter, wet spring and now the dry weather, but it’s holding. Been working hard to not lose the investment. This was from about a week ago.

04d6cb5d00227a691226330f34893bb6.jpg


.

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It was better this year with the dry stretch, but my red maples are starting to get those fungal spots on the leaves again. Annoying.

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1 hour ago, dendrite said:

Some oddities on that list.  Balsam fir's shade tolerance is only a teeny bit less than that of hemlock, the only species on the list to earn an "S" for light.  Also, seeing yellow birch listed as the tallest tree - 100' when nothing else is listed at over 80 - is weird.  White pine is the state's tallest native tree by a significant amount.  Also, the species with the greatest volume in the Maine forest, red spruce, isn't even listed.  (Maybe like the St. John Valley Francophones, they lump red with black spruce, though they use the label "red spruce" - epinette rouge - for tamarack!)

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1 hour ago, tamarack said:

Some oddities on that list.  Balsam fir's shade tolerance is only a teeny bit less than that of hemlock, the only species on the list to earn an "S" for light.  Also, seeing yellow birch listed as the tallest tree - 100' when nothing else is listed at over 80 - is weird.  White pine is the state's tallest native tree by a significant amount.  Also, the species with the greatest volume in the Maine forest, red spruce, isn't even listed.  (Maybe like the St. John Valley Francophones, they lump red with black spruce, though they use the label "red spruce" - epinette rouge - for tamarack!)

Yeah the 100’ yellow birch and only 80’ white pines stood out to me too. I have some huge hemlock and white pine in the back woods that have to be over 100ft. 

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29 minutes ago, dendrite said:

Yeah the 100’ yellow birch and only 80’ white pines stood out to me too. I have some huge hemlock and white pine in the back woods that have to be over 100ft. 

Can't say I've seen a hemlock over 100', or at least way over.  However, there are superstory pines all over northern Maine that are 120'+.  Some in southern Maine too - one spot that stands out is in the woods between Sabbathday Lake and the Shaker village on Route 26.  Another is the Gardiner forest in South Gardiner -30+ years ago  I tallied pines there that had 6 logs of 16' each plus 25-35' of topwood.  I think those trees are still there.

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48 minutes ago, tamarack said:Can't say I've seen a hemlock over 100', or at least way over.  However, there are superstory pines all over northern Maine that are 120'+.  Some in southern Maine too - one spot that stands out is in the woods between Sabbathday Lake and the Shaker village on Route 26.  Another is the Gardiner forest in South Gardiner -30+ years ago  I tallied pines there that had 6 logs of 16' each plus 25-35' of topwood.  I think those trees are still there.

Sorry...I meant to put the 100’ label on the pines and not the hemlock. I think there’s only 1 NH hemlock measured at over 100’. I’m probably overestimating my white pines too, but there are some very large ones out there and the hemlock have to compete with them.

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Up and down year for my lawn.  Started out great.  Brown out by the end of June.  Then a quick 3.25" of rain and it looked great again.  Now with lack of rain it's starting to brown out.  I wouldn't mind the tropical system in the Atlantic to come up here as a strong depression and give New England a few inches of water.   Lots of haves and have nots this season.

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4 hours ago, dendrite said:

Yeah the 100’ yellow birch and only 80’ white pines stood out to me too. I have some huge hemlock and white pine in the back woods that have to be over 100ft. 

You should see the white pines and yellow birch at our house in Bridgton.  I’ll post pictures some day when I remember.  They have to be 100’ tall.  The trunks are probably 24” dia.

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47 minutes ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

You should see the white pines and yellow birch at our house in Bridgton.  I’ll post pictures some day when I remember.  They have to be 100’ tall.  The trunks are probably 24” dia.

I’ll have to go single some of mine out and get pics. I need a 2020 pic of the chestnut out there too. This is all I have on my ipad. There’s a few pines out there with diameters like this. Some of the hemlocks are near the heights of the biggies. I thought most of the trees out there were white pine until I put my glasses on and actually got a good look at the foliage near the top. 
59D25AEE-1629-4ECE-9793-D5901401A622.jpeg
BA9EAD78-DBBB-4229-88DC-728C19B87B0C.jpeg

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13 minutes ago, amarshall said:

anyone have an idea how to kill violets. My lawn guy said pulling them is basically pruning them. 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ortho-Weed-B-Gon-16-oz-Chickweed-Clover-Oxalis-Killer-for-Lawns-Concentrate-0396410/203686814#customer_reviews

This is your best bet from big box store stuff. They are hard to eradicate, may take a couple of apps.

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5 hours ago, amarshall said:

anyone have an idea how to kill violets. My lawn guy said pulling them is basically pruning them. 

 

5 hours ago, backedgeapproaching said:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ortho-Weed-B-Gon-16-oz-Chickweed-Clover-Oxalis-Killer-for-Lawns-Concentrate-0396410/203686814#customer_reviews

This is your best bet from big box store stuff. They are hard to eradicate, may take a couple of apps.

It’s worked for me as well, as noted may require mor3 than one app, but give it a week or two to judge results

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On 7/30/2020 at 12:58 PM, backedgeapproaching said:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ortho-Weed-B-Gon-16-oz-Chickweed-Clover-Oxalis-Killer-for-Lawns-Concentrate-0396410/203686814#customer_reviews

This is your best bet from big box store stuff. They are hard to eradicate, may take a couple of apps.

I've had success with triclopyr as well with wild violets.

I've also purchased products labeled as poison ivy killer that contain triclopyr as the active ingredient.

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I'll never understand peoples - especially weather weenies - obsession with a monochrome green lawn.  Negative for the environment in so many aspects.

1) Takes more water to maintain during dry conditions

2) Requires more synthetic pesticides / herbicides to achieve and maintain

3) Requires more frequent mowing (lawnmowers are notoriously awful for CO2 emissions)

4) Completely devoid of any native offerings for pollinators

To each their own, but I enjoy my cornucopia of clover, creeping charlie, violets and dandelions that I've had to mow once in the past month.

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Well the day finally came. I was out mowing before heading to work and stepped on a nest of something that likes to sting/bite. I think I escaped with only about a half dozen burning/throbbing welts.

Still not sure what they were though. Nest was clearly in the ground, they fly, it's a searing sting/bite, but didn't look anything like a yellow jacket. Looked smaller to me, blackish body and yellowish legs.

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On ‎8‎/‎4‎/‎2020 at 3:10 PM, OceanStWx said:

Well the day finally came. I was out mowing before heading to work and stepped on a nest of something that likes to sting/bite. I think I escaped with only about a half dozen burning/throbbing welts.

Still not sure what they were though. Nest was clearly in the ground, they fly, it's a searing sting/bite, but didn't look anything like a yellow jacket. Looked smaller to me, blackish body and yellowish legs.

We've occasionally had paper wasps in underground nests here - once did a partial striptease in my driveway (sometimes being at the end of a dead-end road is good) when those critters flew into my clothing on my 4th lawnmower pass by their hole in the ground.  They have kind of a reverse yellowjacket pattern, skinny yellowish stripes on a black background.

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@dendrite @tamarack

A big nursery nearby here is going out of business and they have a decent size chestnut tree at 85% off. I dont have the tag right now to see what type it is or where it comes from, but I was going to maybe buy it today. I know you guys have experience with these on some level. Its $300 plus dollar tree I can get for 45-50$, but dont wont to if there is a high chance of it getting whatever knocked out the chestnuts.

Anything I should be looking for specifically with this tree?

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On 7/28/2020 at 10:17 AM, Dan said:

This time last year from the bottom of the image out was all thick woods. Made the decision earlier this year to stretch it out. Been fighting with the late winter, wet spring and now the dry weather, but it’s holding. Been working hard to not lose the investment. This was from about a week ago.

04d6cb5d00227a691226330f34893bb6.jpg


.

Drool. Wicked nice, congrats!

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28 minutes ago, backedgeapproaching said:

@dendrite @tamarack

A big nursery nearby here is going out of business and they have a decent size chestnut tree at 85% off. I dont have the tag right now to see what type it is or where it comes from, but I was going to maybe buy it today. I know you guys have experience with these on some level. Its $300 plus dollar tree I can get for 45-50$, but dont wont to if there is a high chance of it getting whatever knocked out the chestnuts.

Anything I should be looking for specifically with this tree?

I replied in the other thread.

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Lawn is baked out at this point.  Even neighbors who water are struggling to keep things "green"

Plants, trees, shrubs are also showing the stress of lack of water.  

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Anyone here have native mt laurel?  Mine are experiencing leaf loss for several years.  These are very old specimens that used to bloom nicely.

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