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Damage In Tolland

Heavy heavy lawn thread 2019

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1 hour ago, OceanStWx said:

I'm also struggling with one of my red maples at home. I'm not sure what happened to it. 

We planted two a little over a year and a half ago, trunks about 2 inches at their thickest. One is thriving, but the other lost the top of its crown. Full foliage around the middle and bottom though. I've weeded and watered, but still not seeing any signs of life on top. 

Maybe try an endomycorrhizal inoculant treatment? I've thought about doing that with my trees since they're planted out in the lawn and not in the forest where there's abundant beneficial fungi. I have a bunch of trees that would benefit from ectomyccorhizal ones as well. (chestnuts, tulip poplar, hickory, willow, etc).

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6 minutes ago, dendrite said:

Maybe try an endomycorrhizal inoculant treatment? I've thought about doing that with my trees since they're planted out in the lawn and not in the forest where there's abundant beneficial fungi. I have a bunch of trees that would benefit from ectomyccorhizal ones as well. (chestnuts, tulip poplar, hickory, willow, etc).

I'll have to look into that, because I really don't want to lose it after my very deliberate attempt to find a blazing red fall color to plant. 

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2 minutes ago, OceanStWx said:

I'll have to look into that, because I really don't want to lose it after my very deliberate attempt to find a blazing red fall color to plant. 

https://radicalmycology.com/educational-tools/other-fungi/mycorrhizal-fungi-101/

https://www.bio-organics.com/pages/specific-plants-trees-endo-mycorrhizae-and-ecto-mycorrhizae

Lots of products out there on Amazon, but I'm still researching reviews.

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1 hour ago, OceanStWx said:

I'll have to look into that, because I really don't want to lose it after my very deliberate attempt to find a blazing red fall color to plant. 

I have a red maple here but its not a vibrant color in the fall,  My neighbor has some rock maples and those have some vibrant color to them.

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6 minutes ago, dryslot said:

I have a red maple here but its not a vibrant color in the fall,  My neighbor has some rock maples and those have some vibrant color to them.

I grabbed a variant specifically for fall color, I think they are autumn blaze. 

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8 minutes ago, OceanStWx said:

I grabbed a variant specifically for fall color, I think they are autumn blaze. 

Ah, Ok, I had a very nice rock maple that was a 12 yr old tree that I had lost, The 2 years before it died the leaves were real small which I found odd, Then the next year the top of the trees had died but the rest of the tree had small leaves, Then the last year, it started to leaf out and stopped and that was it, Come to find out my neighbor had rototilled for a garden and severed one of the main roots to my tree..... :(

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3 minutes ago, dryslot said:

Ah, Ok, I had a very nice rock maple that was a 12 yr old tree that I had lost, The 2 years before it died the leaves were real small which I found odd, Then the next year the top of the trees had died but the rest of the tree had small leaves, Then the last year, it started to leaf out and stopped and that was it, Come to find out my neighbor had rototilled for a garden and severed one of the main roots to my tree..... :(

Its sister tree and the lower branches all have red-tinged new growth leaves, so all hope is not lost for me.

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On 7/5/2019 at 12:50 PM, OceanStWx said:

I grabbed a variant specifically for fall color, I think they are autumn blaze. 

We did the same.  I think we got a Red Sunset, but it might be an October Glory--forgot what we went with.   I do know we got it at about 15', I'm eager for it to get another 5-8 to better block the neighbors.  I guess that'll be 2-4 years of growing.

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This has been as green as my lawn has looked so late in the season. While not the extreme lush green like early June, looks great overall. It seems like I lost some of the red thread which is good. Lots of mushrooms though. Will throw on another application before the rain Friday.

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2 hours ago, moneypitmike said:

We did the same.  I think we got a Red Sunset, but it might be an October Glory--forgot what we went with.   I do know we got it at about 15', I'm eager for it to get another 5-8 to better block the neighbors.  I guess that'll be 2-4 years of growing.

I'm actually pretty happy otherwise with how the gardening is coming along. All the new plantings are showing signs of new growth. The spirea particularly look healthy, and the lily of the valley and hydrangea in the last couple of weeks have shown new growth as well. 

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Question about hydrangea. For some reason ours has not had any real blooms since we planted them a few years ago. Does anyone no why? I did read they should get morning sun and aftn shade and mine sort of get the opposite. Is it possible they are not in the correct "zone" for temperatures? I have no idea what kind these are. 

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10 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

Question about hydrangea. For some reason ours has not had any real blooms since we planted them a few years ago. Does anyone no why? I did read they should get morning sun and aftn shade and mine sort of get the opposite. Is it possible they are not in the correct "zone" for temperatures? I have no idea what kind these are. 

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/hydrangea/hydrangea-not-blooming.htm

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Nice article--pretty much sums it up. With Hydrangeas that bloom on new wood, you will never have any blooming issues--with those new wood versions they always have great blooms here even though it routinely gets down to -20F to-25F. Annabelle, Incrediball, Limelight are a few(not a hydrangea expert, sure there are many more varieties) that will always bloom reliably with no fear of winter die back. You probably have some variety that blooms on old wood--depending on snow cover, temps, etc I guess could affect next years blooms.

My in laws have some old wood blooming hydrangeas(no idea what cultivar)--I've never seen them bloom once in 10+ years here in VT

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Mine are out of control. I'm thinking of cutting it way back to almost nothing. Rhodies and forsythia too.

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29 minutes ago, dendrite said:

Mine are out of control. I'm thinking of cutting it way back to almost nothing. Rhodies and forsythia too.

We opted for the BloomStruck cultivar since it only grows to around 4-5 feet. We didn't want to block our front windows.

On a side note, it really is helpful when you do the planting and know what you actually have in the ground for maintenance purposes. I couldn't imagine trying to figure out what previous owners had.

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15 minutes ago, OceanStWx said:

We opted for the BloomStruck cultivar since it only grows to around 4-5 feet. We didn't want to block our front windows.

On a side note, it really is helpful when you do the planting and know what you actually have in the ground for maintenance purposes. I couldn't imagine trying to figure out what previous owners had.

The previous owners here let everything get out of control and I've only recently made an effort to cut it back and get everything in check. I had a couple of yews that were like 30ft tall in front of the house. No thanks.

Anyone know the best time to cut a rhody way back? I'm guessing in March before it starts putting out new growth?

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1 hour ago, dendrite said:

The previous owners here let everything get out of control and I've only recently made an effort to cut it back and get everything in check. I had a couple of yews that were like 30ft tall in front of the house. No thanks.

Anyone know the best time to cut a rhody way back? I'm guessing in March before it starts putting out new growth?

http://www.harvestpower.com/best-time-prune-azaleas-rhododendrons/

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Thanks Bob. Maybe it's old wood. If it dies back, not sure what I can do. Sounds like no way of preventing that?

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1 hour ago, dendrite said:

The previous owners here let everything get out of control and I've only recently made an effort to cut it back and get everything in check. I had a couple of yews that were like 30ft tall in front of the house. No thanks.

Anyone know the best time to cut a rhody way back? I'm guessing in March before it starts putting out new growth?

I cut down and removed 4 Rhodys on the shade side of the house as it created a wet mold situation, opened it up nicely. The Hostas are flowering now. 

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Big difference compared to last year when I had the trees down in the front and a weed infested first growing season. Acidic soil slowly being raised. Getting dry though but I don’t water, let nature do it’s thing:

UpIJcpr.jpg

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10 hours ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

Big difference compared to last year when I had the trees down in the front and a weed infested first growing season. Acidic soil slowly being raised. Getting dry though but I don’t water, let nature do it’s thing:

UpIJcpr.jpg

Many of the grass species often used in the North are cool-season adapted, and will naturally become dormant in big heat/dryness then spring back to life when cooler wx returns.  One can keep such grasses green throughout with abundant watering, but it's not the natural sequence for those species - more like using artificial lights to force your potted daffodils to bloom for the mid-March flower show. 

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On July 8, 2019 at 8:31 AM, CoastalWx said:

Question about hydrangea. For some reason ours has not had any real blooms since we planted them a few years ago. Does anyone no why? I did read they should get morning sun and aftn shade and mine sort of get the opposite. Is it possible they are not in the correct "zone" for temperatures? I have no idea what kind these are. 

What kind are they? My lace cap hydrangeas went gangbusters this year, but I got zilch from the traditional ones. Thinking it's because I didn't cut them back last fall. 

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On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 9:52 PM, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

Big difference compared to last year when I had the trees down in the front and a weed infested first growing season. Acidic soil slowly being raised. Getting dry though but I don’t water, let nature do it’s thing:

UpIJcpr.jpg

How often do you mow?

 

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1 hour ago, mostman said:

What do you folks think? Sawyer Beetle? Doesn’t look shiny enough to be an Asian Longhorned. 

F99684D3-F46D-4AB6-B2AC-CC6D5925B9B3.jpeg

Agreed.  Markings don’t look like Longhorn beetle

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12 hours ago, mostman said:

What do you folks think? Sawyer Beetle? Doesn’t look shiny enough to be an Asian Longhorned. 

F99684D3-F46D-4AB6-B2AC-CC6D5925B9B3.jpeg

Agree.  ALB is not only shiny, but has much more distinct white dots.  Native longhorned beetle, aka sawyer, or powder-post.

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Done trying for grass for now. Some good, some bad. Will get some more loam and seed in the fall.

Planted 6 false cypress today and a decent size limber pine that I got for half off. Looks like a nice full tree that grows about 25’ tall.

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Is this just thatch? We've had plenty of rain and the lawn looks dry in spots. I posted this in the NNE thread by accident, but got some suggestions for this lawn issue. Someone said red thread, but it's not that. Also suggested was to dig up a 6"x6" crap spot and compare the roots to a good spot. I've checked before for grubs and we've never had them, so not sure that what it is. We have three sections of lawn, all seeded with different variety. The other two look decent with no straw-like appearance, but the original seeded lawn, done by our builders in 2013 in these photos is the question.

 

12524c4f60477067dd4e65f1fb9d67a6.jpgfa9a4cb8ae6fa4103f1706499af8cd61.jpg

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