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18 minutes ago, WaryWarren said:

I got Pfizer #2 on Monday. Nothing more than a headache and some lethargy. Do it, you hedging wussies.

I've had my second dose of Pfizer since early January, no problems at all. 

 

Not sure why people are living their life in fear. Get out there, get the shot, be a patriot. We are at war with the virus,  when you look back do you want to be a draft dodger/bone spur pansy or do you want to be a freedom loving american that did your part?

:guitar: :cory::sizzle::weight_lift::pimp::weenie:

Insert 1,000 american flag emojis.

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5 minutes ago, mattb65 said:

I've had my second dose of Pfizer since early January, no problems at all. 

 

Not sure why people are living their life in fear. Get out there, get the shot, be a patriot. We are at war with the virus,  when you look back do you want to be a draft dodger/bone spur pansy or do you want to be a freedom loving american that did your part?

:guitar: :cory::sizzle::weight_lift::pimp::weenie:

Insert 1,000 american flag emojis.

Almost without exception, the people I know who aren't getting vaxxed aren't living in fear at all.  They have been out there living life for the past year and would just as soon have the mask mandates end.  They may be afraid of the vaccine but they aren't too concerned about covid.

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38 minutes ago, mattb65 said:

I've had my second dose of Pfizer since early January, no problems at all. 

 

Not sure why people are living their life in fear. Get out there, get the shot, be a patriot. We are at war with the virus,  when you look back do you want to be a draft dodger/bone spur pansy or do you want to be a freedom loving american that did your part?

:guitar: :cory::sizzle::weight_lift::pimp::weenie:

Insert 1,000 american flag emojis.

A lot of the people who won’t get vaxxed think being a draft dodger/bone spur pansy is heroic. After all, skipping out on Vietnam can be made up for by fighting in one’s own personal Vietnam (trying to avoid getting STDs).

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I just read that upon further examination by US vaccine advisors, the amount of blood clots linked to the J&J vaccine increased to 15. All of them women, and 13 of the 15 under 50 years old. I assume they will resume the J&J vaccine with a warning for the blood clot risk to younger women.

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16 hours ago, mattb65 said:

I've had my second dose of Pfizer since early January, no problems at all. 

 

Not sure why people are living their life in fear. Get out there, get the shot, be a patriot. We are at war with the virus,  when you look back do you want to be a draft dodger/bone spur pansy or do you want to be a freedom loving american that did your part?

:guitar: :cory::sizzle::weight_lift::pimp::weenie:

Insert 1,000 american flag emojis.

Just received my Pfizer second dose yesterday. First dose just a sore arm but this one has hit like a truck. Low grade fever, chills, couldn't sleep last night. Arm really sore, fatigue, and body aches I didn't know could hurt.lol Took some acetaminophen to cut fever and aches hopefully starts to wind down in the next 24hrs. 

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1 hour ago, winterwx21 said:

I just read that upon further examination by US vaccine advisors, the amount of blood clots linked to the J&J vaccine increased to 15. All of them women, and 13 of the 15 under 50 years old. I assume they will resume the J&J vaccine with a warning for the blood clot risk to younger women.

This is definitely interesting,  if the rough math I did before is still close to accurate this would correlate to a roughly 1 in 100,000 risk of this serious adverse reaction in women under 50.

I wonder if there are other commonalities besides gender like being on combined oral contraceptives as an additional risk factor. 

I agree either a warning or even an outright restriction on giving it to women under 50 would both be reasonable. 

Even though the risk is small, the consequences are devastating. If I were in the at risk demographic I would 100% choose Pfizer or Moderna.

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1 hour ago, Cary67 said:

Just received my Pfizer second dose yesterday. First dose just a sore arm but this one has hit like a truck. Low grade fever, chills, couldn't sleep last night. Arm really sore, fatigue, and body aches I didn't know could hurt.lol Took some acetaminophen to cut fever and aches hopefully starts to wind down in the next 24hrs. 

My wife had similar symptoms the day after her second shot of Moderna. The following day she felt perfectly fine.

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3 hours ago, TimB84 said:

Oh God...

As someone with some experience in suicide attempts (unfortunately), it often takes a long time to get to such a desperate point in life... sometimes many years.  There are exceptions of course.  I hope the suicide numbers are not really above baseline in the coming years (not that the baseline is something to celebrate), but the jury is out as far as that goes.  

My position is that the closures were justified early on in the pandemic.  We were dealing with a brand new virus, learning as we go and with very limited ability to test, almost flying blind.  I think the risk of keeping everything open and then potentially getting a quick, overwhelming surge into the hospitals was too great.  I do think some things remained closed for too long, especially in certain states.  

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55 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

As someone with some experience in suicide attempts (unfortunately), it often takes a long time to get to such a desperate point in life... sometimes many years.  There are exceptions of course.  I hope the suicide numbers are not really above baseline in the coming years (not that the baseline is something to celebrate), but the jury is out as far as that goes.  

My position is that the closures were justified early on in the pandemic.  We were dealing with a brand new virus, learning as we go and with very limited ability to test, almost flying blind.  I think the risk of keeping everything open and then potentially getting a quick, overwhelming surge into the hospitals was too great.  I do think some things remained closed for too long, especially in certain states.  

I don’t disagree with your point that we still have yet to know what effect this pandemic will have on the suicide rate in 2021 (or 2022 or 2023). But we can’t definitively say it will go up, or go down, or stay the same as the (like you said) already horrific baseline. But evidence that suicide rates have gone down so far makes those who categorically state things like “pandemic restrictions will cause (or are causing) the suicide rate to skyrocket” look all the more ludicrous. It’s no longer just that those claims are unsubstantiated, it’s that there is now evidence to the contrary.

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4 minutes ago, TimB84 said:

I don’t disagree with your point that we still have yet to know what effect this pandemic will have on the suicide rate in 2021 (or 2022 or 2023). But we can’t definitively say it will go up, or go down, or stay the same as the (like you said) already horrific baseline. But evidence that suicide rates have gone down so far makes those who categorically state things like “pandemic restrictions will cause (or are causing) the suicide rate to skyrocket” look all the more ludicrous. It’s no longer just that those claims are unsubstantiated, it’s that there is now evidence to the contrary.

I admit the first couple months of total lockdown were pretty depressing, and that was just from stir-craziness. My fiancee and I were never at risk of losing our livelihood (I'm in broadcast media, she's a social worker).

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1 hour ago, Hoosier said:

As someone with some experience in suicide attempts (unfortunately), it often takes a long time to get to such a desperate point in life... sometimes many years.  There are exceptions of course.  I hope the suicide numbers are not really above baseline in the coming years (not that the baseline is something to celebrate), but the jury is out as far as that goes.  

My position is that the closures were justified early on in the pandemic.  We were dealing with a brand new virus, learning as we go and with very limited ability to test, almost flying blind.  I think the risk of keeping everything open and then potentially getting a quick, overwhelming surge into the hospitals was too great.  I do think some things remained closed for too long, especially in certain states.  

suicides have been steadily increasing (with a slight dip in 2019) for the past twenty years, and i fully expect them to go back up to the pre-pandemic baseline.  however, since they were already increasing for 20 years prior to covid, there isn't a way to show cause-and-effect if we see them begin increasing again.

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3 hours ago, mattb65 said:

This is definitely interesting,  if the rough math I did before is still close to accurate this would correlate to a roughly 1 in 100,000 risk of this serious adverse reaction in women under 50.

I wonder if there are other commonalities besides gender like being on combined oral contraceptives as an additional risk factor. 

I agree either a warning or even an outright restriction on giving it to women under 50 would both be reasonable. 

Even though the risk is small, the consequences are devastating. If I were in the at risk demographic I would 100% choose Pfizer or Moderna.

This is a really good article that goes into the data on the blood clots from this vaccine and explains the rationale that different members of the advisory committee used in making their decisions.  They also discuss the risks and benefits of different courses of action. 

https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/23/health/johnson-vaccine-acip-recommendation/index.html

They present a lot of numbers in the risks/benefits section. 

"For every million doses of vaccine given to women 18 to 49, 13 TTS cases can be expected, Oliver said. But 12 deaths from Covid-19 would be prevented and 127 ICU admissions would be prevented among those women if they had access to the Janssen vaccine."

 

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3 minutes ago, fujiwara79 said:

suicides have been steadily increasing (with a slight dip in 2019) for the past twenty years, and i fully expect them to go back up to the pre-pandemic baseline.  however, since they were already increasing for 20 years prior to covid, there isn't a way to show cause-and-effect if we see them begin increasing again.

Maybe not, but if it's an unusually large jump, then it would be fair to suspect the effects of the pandemic as being the reason.  Hopefully we don't see that.

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7 minutes ago, CheeselandSkies said:

I admit the first couple months of total lockdown were pretty depressing, and that was just from stir-craziness. My fiancee and I were never at risk of losing our livelihood (I'm in broadcast media, she's a social worker).

I fully agree, no matter how sick of commuting to an office 5 days a week I was pre-pandemic, the early days of this lockdown sucked. Hell, there weren’t even sports to watch. And my wife and I are in the same boat, I’m in a mostly non-client-facing (except via phone) financial services job and she’s in a non-patient-facing job in the healthcare field, so both working from home with job security. But with most forms of entertainment shut down, there were even fewer diversions from the harsh realities of life a year ago than there are now, and the suicide rate still has yet to show any signs of a spike.

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The background annual fatality rate back then was about triple what it is today, hence why covid ends up as such an anomaly.  

1918 & 1919 had some wild fatality numbers with both a brutal pandemic and major war. Combine that with all the other diseases of the time, not great.
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interested way to think about people having medical issues after vaccines.   With half of the adult population in the US having at least one vaccine so far, it makes it absurdly easy to draw the connection between a vaccine and some kind of ailment since logically tons of people out of that 50% vaccinated are going to have some kind of medical issue during the past 4 months.   It would be like saying people are getting sick/dying/etc. after going to Thanksgiving Dinner with family.  Just by the sheer number of people doing it of course there will be people with health issues afterwards, even when it's not connected

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