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Queencitywx

Night snow or Day snow

Night snow or Day Snow  

58 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you prefer snow during the day or at night?



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Day snow all the way, I love watching it fall.......though I prefer it to start at night around midnight and then snow thru noon the next day.....so maybe I can count as both....still though there is something about heavy wind driven snow in a streetlight....

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4 minutes ago, frazdaddy said:

Yeah, night snow is better. I do like when it starts late afternoon and continues through the night though. I know , I'm a brat.

I feel that is a reasonable request. That's how the best storms start, IMO. Cloud deck in by 8AM, snowing by 2 and ending around 10 the next morning.

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I'm on team night for one reason specifically. less people are on the roads, so when it's pouring the snow, I'm able to ravel around and capture photos and video a lot easier and safer.

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Voted night snow because it's awesome waking up to a nice blanket of snow when it wasn't there when you went to sleep but I do like day snow and watching it accumulate.

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Day snow.  it took about 40 years, but finally my love for sleep has finally surpassed my love of snow.  I hate to miss ANY snow that is falling, so I'd rather it be during the day.  

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9 minutes ago, WxKnurd said:

Team night! But like fraz and QC, let the snow start late afternoon and then hammer all night.  Love talking a walk in the dark when it is ripping away.

I talked my wife into a midnight trail ride in the minibeast during the last storm. It was awesome.

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Do I have to pick one? ...... There is an argument for both..... Night snow accumulates easier and day snow allows you better viewing. I guess I will go with day snow for now.

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60/40 Day/Night Snow

This would be pretty much ideal:

On December 30, after an extended period of below normal temperatures, a strong cold front moved through the area during the early morning hours, ushering in an unusually intense Arctic air mass.  Increasing high and mid-level cloudiness blotted out the sunlight, and temperatures fell into the 20s throughout the day.  Strong cold air advection overwhelmed the region, courtesy of an anomalous high pressure, exceeding 1050 mb, centered over the upper Midwest.  By late afternoon, a vigorous upper level disturbance dropping southeast began to interact with energy in the southern branch of the jet stream over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, along the stalled frontal boundary.  Precipitation began to quickly break out and intensify over southern Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida.

By early evening, an area of low pressure began to form off of the northern Florida coastline and rapidly intensify, as the two disturbances merged.  By midnight, heavy snow was falling along a line from Montgomery, to Macon, to Columbia, and northeast to Wilmington, with light snow reported as far north as Asheville over to Raleigh and New Bern.  Rapid cyclogenesis was well underway during the pre-dawn hours of the 31st, as the pressure decreased from 996 mb to 984 mb by 6 AM.  As the storm system crawled slowly north-northeast, it continued to intensify, and conditions continued to deteriorate.  Heavy snow spread northward into Atlanta, Greensboro, Raleigh, and Norfolk, with temperatures reported in the mid-teens across much of the area.

By midday on December 31, the storm system was located just southeast of Myrtle Beach, and the pressure had dropped to 968 mb, prompting the National Weather Service to issue rare blizzard warnings from northern and eastern sections of South Carolina, up through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and into eastern sections of Virginia and into the mid-Atlantic.  As the afternoon progressed, wind gusts as high as 55 MPH were reported as far inland as Florence and up through Raleigh-Durham and were accompanied by 2-4" inch/hour snowfall rates, producing whiteout conditions.

The system continued to deepen through the night and move slowly north-northeast, compliments of a strong blocking ridge centered over Greenland, stretching back into eastern Canada.  Heavy snow continued over much of North and South Carolina, up through Virginia and into the eastern mid-Atlantic during the overnight hours of the 31st, as the storm moved over Cape Hatteras.  By dawn, light snow lingered over northern South Carolina and western North Carolina, while moderate snow and gusty winds continued through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and central Virginia.  Heavy snow was reported over eastern Virginia and farther north into the mid-Atlantic.

As the storm departed the area on 1/1, light snow continued to fall over central and eastern sections of North Carolina and Virginia as temperatures fell into the single digits.  Over the next two days, a pair of upper level disturbances brought cloudy skies and periods of light snow and flurries across upper sections of the Southeast, along with reinforcing shots of Arctic air.

All told, this would be recorded as one of the most intense and widespread winter storms over many areas of the Southeast, dating back to the early 1800s.  Daily and storm total snowfall records were set, with many locations receiving 24-36" of snowfall, with drifts as high as 10-12'.  All-time record low temperatures would be recorded, as widespread below zero readings were reported.  The apex of the storm saw the pressure sink to 954 mb, producing extremely heavy snowfall and high winds, as temperatures well into the teens extended throughout much of the Southeast.  It would prove to be a storm that would be remembered for a generation.

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I've been bitten by heavy daytime snow not accumulating or sticking several times in my life.   For that reason alone, I'll role the dice with night snow any chance I get.

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29 minutes ago, Cold Rain said:

60/40 Day/Night Snow

This would be pretty much ideal:

On December 30, after an extended period of below normal temperatures, a strong cold front moved through the area during the early morning hours, ushering in an unusually intense Arctic air mass.  Increasing high and mid-level cloudiness blotted out the sunlight, and temperatures fell into the 20s throughout the day.  Strong cold air advection overwhelmed the region, courtesy of an anomalous high pressure, exceeding 1050 mb, centered over the upper Midwest.  By late afternoon, a vigorous upper level disturbance dropping southeast began to interact with energy in the southern branch of the jet stream over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, along the stalled frontal boundary.  Precipitation began to quickly break out and intensify over southern Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida.

By early evening, an area of low pressure began to form off of the northern Florida coastline and rapidly intensify, as the two disturbances merged.  By midnight, heavy snow was falling along a line from Montgomery, to Macon, to Columbia, and northeast to Wilmington, with light snow reported as far north as Asheville over to Raleigh and New Bern.  Rapid cyclogenesis was well underway during the pre-dawn hours of the 31st, as the pressure decreased from 996 mb to 984 mb by 6 AM.  As the storm system crawled slowly north-northeast, it continued to intensify, and conditions continued to deteriorate.  Heavy snow spread northward into Atlanta, Greensboro, Raleigh, and Norfolk, with temperatures reported in the mid-teens across much of the area.

By midday on December 31, the storm system was located just southeast of Myrtle Beach, and the pressure had dropped to 968 mb, prompting the National Weather Service to issue rare blizzard warnings from northern and eastern sections of South Carolina, up through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and into eastern sections of Virginia and into the mid-Atlantic.  As the afternoon progressed, wind gusts as high as 55 MPH were reported as far inland as Florence and up through Raleigh-Durham and were accompanied by 2-4" inch/hour snowfall rates, producing whiteout conditions.

The system continued to deepen through the night and move slowly north-northeast, compliments of a strong blocking ridge centered over Greenland, stretching back into eastern Canada.  Heavy snow continued over much of North and South Carolina, up through Virginia and into the eastern mid-Atlantic during the overnight hours of the 31st, as the storm moved over Cape Hatteras.  By dawn, light snow lingered over northern South Carolina and western North Carolina, while moderate snow and gusty winds continued through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and central Virginia.  Heavy snow was reported over eastern Virginia and farther north into the mid-Atlantic.

As the storm departed the area on 1/1, light snow continued to fall over central and eastern sections of North Carolina and Virginia as temperatures fell into the single digits.  Over the next two days, a pair of upper level disturbances brought cloudy skies and periods of light snow and flurries across upper sections of the Southeast, along with reinforcing shots of Arctic air.

All told, this would be recorded as one of the most intense and widespread winter storms over many areas of the Southeast, dating back to the early 1800s.  Daily and storm total snowfall records were set, with many locations receiving 24-36" of snowfall, with drifts as high as 10-12'.  All-time record low temperatures would be recorded, as widespread below zero readings were reported.  The apex of the storm saw the pressure sink to 954 mb, producing extremely heavy snowfall and high winds, as temperatures well into the teens extended throughout much of the Southeast.  It would prove to be a storm that would be remembered for a generation.

Damn, I didnt know you wrote porn. 

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35 minutes ago, Cold Rain said:

60/40 Day/Night Snow

This would be pretty much ideal:

On December 30, after an extended period of below normal temperatures, a strong cold front moved through the area during the early morning hours, ushering in an unusually intense Arctic air mass.  Increasing high and mid-level cloudiness blotted out the sunlight, and temperatures fell into the 20s throughout the day.  Strong cold air advection overwhelmed the region, courtesy of an anomalous high pressure, exceeding 1050 mb, centered over the upper Midwest.  By late afternoon, a vigorous upper level disturbance dropping southeast began to interact with energy in the southern branch of the jet stream over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, along the stalled frontal boundary.  Precipitation began to quickly break out and intensify over southern Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida.

By early evening, an area of low pressure began to form off of the northern Florida coastline and rapidly intensify, as the two disturbances merged.  By midnight, heavy snow was falling along a line from Montgomery, to Macon, to Columbia, and northeast to Wilmington, with light snow reported as far north as Asheville over to Raleigh and New Bern.  Rapid cyclogenesis was well underway during the pre-dawn hours of the 31st, as the pressure decreased from 996 mb to 984 mb by 6 AM.  As the storm system crawled slowly north-northeast, it continued to intensify, and conditions continued to deteriorate.  Heavy snow spread northward into Atlanta, Greensboro, Raleigh, and Norfolk, with temperatures reported in the mid-teens across much of the area.

By midday on December 31, the storm system was located just southeast of Myrtle Beach, and the pressure had dropped to 968 mb, prompting the National Weather Service to issue rare blizzard warnings from northern and eastern sections of South Carolina, up through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and into eastern sections of Virginia and into the mid-Atlantic.  As the afternoon progressed, wind gusts as high as 55 MPH were reported as far inland as Florence and up through Raleigh-Durham and were accompanied by 2-4" inch/hour snowfall rates, producing whiteout conditions.

The system continued to deepen through the night and move slowly north-northeast, compliments of a strong blocking ridge centered over Greenland, stretching back into eastern Canada.  Heavy snow continued over much of North and South Carolina, up through Virginia and into the eastern mid-Atlantic during the overnight hours of the 31st, as the storm moved over Cape Hatteras.  By dawn, light snow lingered over northern South Carolina and western North Carolina, while moderate snow and gusty winds continued through the Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina and central Virginia.  Heavy snow was reported over eastern Virginia and farther north into the mid-Atlantic.

As the storm departed the area on 1/1, light snow continued to fall over central and eastern sections of North Carolina and Virginia as temperatures fell into the single digits.  Over the next two days, a pair of upper level disturbances brought cloudy skies and periods of light snow and flurries across upper sections of the Southeast, along with reinforcing shots of Arctic air.

All told, this would be recorded as one of the most intense and widespread winter storms over many areas of the Southeast, dating back to the early 1800s.  Daily and storm total snowfall records were set, with many locations receiving 24-36" of snowfall, with drifts as high as 10-12'.  All-time record low temperatures would be recorded, as widespread below zero readings were reported.  The apex of the storm saw the pressure sink to 954 mb, producing extremely heavy snowfall and high winds, as temperatures well into the teens extended throughout much of the Southeast.  It would prove to be a storm that would be remembered for a generation.

Wow, I am moved and I bow to the master.

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Day snow for me or should I say starting early morning a little before sunrise.  Nothing like waking up to snow, drinking coffee while watching it fall and accumulate in the early morning light.

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32 minutes ago, burrel2 said:

I've been bitten by heavy daytime snow not accumulating or sticking several times in my life.   For that reason alone, I'll role the dice with night snow any chance I get.

Exactly how I think.

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38 minutes ago, frazdaddy said:

Wow, I am moved and I bow to the master.

Haha thanks man.  Wouldn't it be nice to be able to read something like that, describing an event during a recent winter?  You ever read those old old articles that talk about weather?  The language used back then and the way they described stuff is pretty awesome.

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14 minutes ago, Cold Rain said:

Haha thanks man.  Wouldn't it be nice to be able to read something like that, describing an event during a recent winter?  You ever read those old old articles that talk about weather?  The language used back then and the way they described stuff is pretty awesome.

Yeah, sometimes I get nostalgic, go back and read the archived news paper articles on some of the best events. I think I might chase to Tug Hill next winter just to say I did it.

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After conferring with my lawyer, we're gonna have to go with late evening snow. 

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The older I get the more I prefer day snow, allowing me to get some sleep. Plus, I know my neighbors think it's weird when I hang my temp flood lights for nighttime viewing. 

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I love a good day time snow. Even if there's no accumulation. It's just so nice to watch. I can't tell you how many times I almost burned my retina trying to see flakes in the flood light.

 

Just kidding.

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