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Damage In Tolland

The 6th Annual SNE Lawn Thread - 2015

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Lesco seed FTW.

I can't comment on lesco seed, as I have never used it. but I have found that penningtons northeast blend is an excellent seed. it comes up quick, and fills in real nice.

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I can't comment on lesco seed, as I have never used it. but I have found that penningtons northeast blend is an excellent seed. it comes up quick, and fills in real nice.

 

I used the Pennington shade stuff and it worked well too. 

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Really? Do you have a gypsy problem out there? We don't have any that I've seen

 

Apparently this happens every Spring. Itś not gypsy moths either..or not that I can see. Just these little green caterpillars. 

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No pics but we green too.  Gotta keep an eye out for next chance of rain so I can put down my next round of fertilizer.  I'm around 7 weeks now since I put 1st round down around 2nd week of April.

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Apparently this happens every Spring. Itś not gypsy moths either..or not that I can see. Just these little green caterpillars. 

Winter Moths

http://www.massaudubon.org/learn/nature-wildlife/insects-arachnids/winter-moths

 

 

 

The winter moth (Operophtera brumata) is an invasive insect that can wreak havoc on our trees. Introduced into the United States from Europe via Canada, is most commonly observed in late fall, early winter as a white adult moth and in spring as a tiny green caterpillar. 

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Apparently this happens every Spring. Itś not gypsy moths either..or not that I can see. Just these little green caterpillars. 

Oh those things..Yeah they are all over the oaks. Inch worms I believe

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Ahh. Those things. Any idea on how to prevent those? Someone said Scotts has a product to put on the ground so itś absorbed by the tree and helps prevent them.

http://www.boston.com/mt/lifestyle/house/blog/growing-wisdom/2014/05/how_to_prevent_winter_moth_cat.html

http://extension.umass.edu/fruitadvisor/sites/fruitadvisor/files/fact-sheets/pdf/Winter%20Moth%20Recommendations%20in%20Blueberry.pdf

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Squiggly oak thingys and cotton everywhere, washed the truck before work, what a mess, glad the pool is still covered. Hopefully now  I can open it for Memorial day weekend if it warms up enough.

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I can't comment on lesco seed, as I have never used it. but I have found that penningtons northeast blend is an excellent seed. it comes up quick, and fills in real nice.

 Totally depends on the type of seed in the bag how fast it comes up.  The bag lists the % breakdown of seeds---like 40% rye 30% KBG 30% fescue.

 

Average germination time:

 

Perennial rye- 5 days

Fescue- 7-10 days

KBG-  10-14+ days

 

When I redid my lawn a few years ago, I special ordered my seed from a place in TN. Before I was a  crazy lawn nut, I did a 25x25 section with a Scotts Sun and Shade mix and it came out really nice IMO. Pennington, Scotts, Lesco can all makes very nice lawns.

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Anybody here ever work with sod?  If so, how did it go?

Can be tricky..especially in warm/summer months. It's vital it stays wet and you dig down deep enough to establish good moisture/root growth  or it will quickly burn out and die

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Anybody here ever work with sod?  If so, how did it go?

 

Can be tricky..especially in warm/summer months. It's vital it stays wet and you dig down deep enough to establish good moisture/root growth  or it will quickly burn out and die

 

I actually did a 6x6 area with sod from HD last spring. Like I have said, fall is best as I was watering the patch nonstop all summer.  This was in the Mid atl so it was warmer than NVT will be, but still why I say fall is so much better to do any seeding/sodding.   It was an old horseshoe pit that I wasn't using so I put some sod in instead of seeding since it was a small area.  Like Kevin said, you need to keep it watered if you are thinking of putting it in now going into summer. I missed some days when I was out of town and came back and it would be pretty browned up.

 

It would get expensive doing a big area, but smaller areas wouldn't be to bad $ wise.

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For grass seed, some folks swear by the URI #2 that is sold at places like Ocean State Job Loot

Created at Univ of Rhode Island for New England climates

With the wind and rain last night, the oak flowers came down in huge numbers last night. With today's dry air and breeze, I expect mini tumbleweeds everywhere when I go home

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I was thinking these were purposely planted like this in a circle. House was built in 1969, but this beast looks older than that. What do you think the chances are of one or more snapping? They are wired together ( previous homeowner) but I had a tree guy take some limbs off last summer and he told me two of them are broken. As you can see ,it is dangerously close to house . It provides tons of shade during afternoon in summer and people rave about how beautiful it is, but I am not a fan . Is it more likely one top would snap off or several? is this a Red Oak? The whole neighborhood is one big Oak forest disaster. Look at the base.. It's massive

E109FE6E-CE15-4D52-BC1A-86418F3C6559_zps

09606EFA-D49E-44FC-96D4-B282E07CDFEA_zps

51090127-D151-4687-A304-1A662CA37F3F_zps

 

 For whatever reason, I can't spot the wire supports - may be too thin to show in the pic (at least for my no-longer-young eyes.)  As long as the wires remain sound and are strong enough, the trees should be okay, but given the nearby "targets", consultation by a licensed arborist would be a prudent course.

 

I would agree that this clump got started some years before the house was built.  If I had to guess at the scenario, perhaps a timber harvest shortly after WW2, then when the homes in that area were being built a couple decades later, the nicest of the young trees were retained as part of landscaping.  A healthy sprout clump of straight and smooth Northern red oak would be a winner.  That those trunks are branch-free until way up and show no pruning scars lower than perhaps 20' above the grass (at least, none on the side pictured) indicates they originated in a dense stand of trees that trained them to be upright and to self-prune the lower limbs.  Their length of clean trunk is my key to their being older than mid-40s, not their diameter.  When I lived in Fort Kent, I saw a "cookie" from the butt of an open-grown red oak cut in Madawaska, another border town.  The cookie was 19" in diameter and had only 42 rings - given room, red oak is a fast grower, even up there at the northerly fringe of their natural range.

 

 

Apparently this happens every Spring. Itś not gypsy moths either..or not that I can see. Just these little green caterpillars. 

There are a number of moths that start as green inchworms.  Winter moth is a recent arrival to the region, but the Bruce spanworm (another inchworm that matures as a moth in mid-late fall, sometimes called hunters' moth) has been around since hardwood forests recovered from glaciation.  All that leaf salad is a buffet for moth and butterfly larvae.

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For whatever reason, I can't spot the wire supports - may be too thin to show in the pic (at least for my no-longer-young eyes.) As long as the wires remain sound and are strong enough, the trees should be okay, but given the nearby "targets", consultation by a licensed arborist would be a prudent course.

I would agree that this clump got started some years before the house was built. If I had to guess at the scenario, perhaps a timber harvest shortly after WW2, then when the homes in that area were being built a couple decades later, the nicest of the young trees were retained as part of landscaping. A healthy sprout clump of straight and smooth Northern red oak would be a winner. That those trunks are branch-free until way up and show no pruning scars lower than perhaps 20' above the grass (at least, none on the side pictured) indicates they originated in a dense stand of trees that trained them to be upright and to self-prune the lower limbs. Their length of clean trunk is my key to their being older than mid-40s, not their diameter. When I lived in Fort Kent, I saw a "cookie" from the butt of an open-grown red oak cut in Madawaska, another border town. The cookie was 19" in diameter and had only 42 rings - given room, red oak is a fast grower, even up there at the northerly fringe of their natural range.

Apparently this happens every Spring. Itś not gypsy moths either..or not that I can see. Just these little green caterpillars.

There are a number of moths that start as green inchworms. Winter moth is a recent arrival to the region, but the Bruce spanworm (another inchworm that matures as a moth in mid-late fall, sometimes called hunters' moth) has been around since hardwood forests recovered from glaciation. All that leaf salad is a buffet for moth and butterfly larvae.

Wow .. That's awesome that you are able to discern all of that from a few pictures. That is interesting. Thank you. Much appreciated

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Winter moth caterpillars are eating my entire neighborhood.  We have 5 wooded acres and they are working through everything.

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I have been using MNLA (massachusett nursey and landscape association) 10-6 (now 0)-4 Turf-o-ganic fertilizer for years on and off when I can find it.  This year is another year where it is proving to be tough to find.  It is 75% organic nitrogen.  I had MNLA leftover for first application, if I can't get it in the next week or so I have to go with something else.  Any favorites/suggestions that would be similar?

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Wow .. That's awesome that you are able to discern all of that from a few pictures. That is interesting. Thank you. Much appreciated

 

You are most welcome.

Well, there's certainly some guesswork involved.  However, I moved to Maine in 1973 to attend the U.Maine forestry program, and have worked in and on the forest since Jan 1976.  It would've been rather dumb if I had not observed a few things during that time.

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You are most welcome.

Well, there's certainly some guesswork involved.  However, I moved to Maine in 1973 to attend the U.Maine forestry program, and have worked in and on the forest since Jan 1976.  It would've been rather dumb if I had not observed a few things during that time.

I need to show you a pic of a tree at the end of my driveway. I think it is Hickory but it is 60-70 ft tall, I am not sure but large Hickory nuts are all over my driveway every year.

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I have been using MNLA (massachusett nursey and landscape association) 10-6 (now 0)-4 Turf-o-ganic fertilizer for years on and off when I can find it.  This year is another year where it is proving to be tough to find.  It is 75% organic nitrogen.  I had MNLA leftover for first application, if I can't get it in the next week or so I have to go with something else.  Any favorites/suggestions that would be similar?

 Yep, Milorganite.  Think it is 5-2-0, but has 4% iron for a nice extra green kick to your lawn. 1 bag does 2500sq ft, but I would do double that sometimes.  Organics are awesome, because you really cant put too much on, unless you just smoother the lawn.

 

Can find it pretty much anywhere- HD, Lowes, Agway, Ace, etc.

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I have been using MNLA (massachusett nursey and landscape association) 10-6 (now 0)-4 Turf-o-ganic fertilizer for years on and off when I can find it.  This year is another year where it is proving to be tough to find.  It is 75% organic nitrogen.  I had MNLA leftover for first application, if I can't get it in the next week or so I have to go with something else.  Any favorites/suggestions that would be similar?

 

For Organic products I have used CGM (Corn Gluten Meal) as well as Alfalfa Pellets.  The Alfalfa ran around $20 for a 40# bag.  

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