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Met Fall 2021 Banter.


HoarfrostHubb
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2 hours ago, tamarack said:

Great field, too.  I recall a 6-3 loss to the Jets (IIRC) in a howling SE rainstorm.  John Stephens had about 175 yards rushing and got the Pats into the red zone during the final minute.  However, the pond was ankle deep on that part of the field, making a figgie attempt near impossible especially into the 50 mph gusts, and they failed to convert the 4th down.  When I'd tuned in during Q3 I wondered why the view was terrible - could hardly see the players in windblown rain/mist.

Rod Rust, Victor Kiam, "Patriot missile" - consistent futility.

I helped to build a house that John Stephens ordered. I actually broke a toe when I dropped part of an oak staircase on it... which led to "toenail talk"...lol   Rod Rust lived in a house near my parent's house (one that a friend lived in when we were kids)

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On 9/21/2021 at 8:50 PM, Supernovice said:

Really interesting report I saw today- cliff notes:

28 of the largest U.S. financial institutions hold $2.2T in syndicated loan exposure. Impact of climate change could be 10% of that portfolio or $200-250B. Which wow- that is NOT priced in. Below is from the report.

 

F2E9C19C-78BA-4055-AB8E-886A059A1606.jpeg

Can you provide the report this is from?

On 9/21/2021 at 9:24 PM, CoastalWx said:

What’s that supposed to mean? Consequences of physical climate risk? That right there is called weather happens. 

This is connected to the Task Force for Climate Related Disclosure (TCFD). TCFD defines climate-related risk as either Physical or Transitional. 

For physical risk, physical risk can either be defined as acute or chronic. Acute being weather as we know it, but with the increased ferocity of weather events that is expected to be realized as the climate changes. Chronic being connected to rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, etc.

Transitional risk centers around identify those financial investments that may ultimately be stranded as the economy transitions from high- to low-carbon intensive.

TCFD is designed to assist financial institution with also identifying opportunities for sound financial investment in changing economy.

 

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57 minutes ago, Chrisrotary12 said:

Can you provide the report this is from?

This is connected to the Task Force for Climate Related Disclosure (TCFD). TCFD defines climate-related risk as either Physical or Transitional. 

For physical risk, physical risk can either be defined as acute or chronic. Acute being weather as we know it, but with the increased ferocity of weather events that is expected to be realized as the climate changes. Chronic being connected to rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, etc.

Transitional risk centers around identify those financial investments that may ultimately be stranded as the economy transitions from high- to low-carbon intensive.

TCFD is designed to assist financial institution with also identifying opportunities for sound financial investment in changing economy.

 

Hopefully they are analyzing the ferocity of decreasing tornado counts and intensities. 

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11 hours ago, tamarack said:

Great field, too.  I recall a 6-3 loss to the Jets (IIRC) in a howling SE rainstorm.  John Stephens had about 175 yards rushing and got the Pats into the red zone during the final minute.  However, the pond was ankle deep on that part of the field, making a figgie attempt near impossible especially into the 50 mph gusts, and they failed to convert the 4th down.  When I'd tuned in during Q3 I wondered why the view was terrible - could hardly see the players in windblown rain/mist.

Rod Rust, Victor Kiam, "Patriot missile" - consistent futility.

I remember getting a frozen ass sitting on those aluminum benches back in the 70's. Went to a game in December after a foot of snow fell and they didn't clear the snow, just brushed it off the benches, coldest I've ever been I think and I've camped out in below zero weather. At least I had a fire camping.

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The supply chain issues are going to get much worse. The price of coal in China was $50 a ton a year ago and is now over $210. They are having severe electricity issues due to coal shortages that is reaking havoc on everything. Some areas are only allowing factories to run 2 or 3 days a week. I read 60 percent of their electricity comes from coal and with current prices plants are not profitable and taking huge losses.  

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1 hour ago, BrianW said:

The supply chain issues are going to get much worse. The price of coal in China was $50 a ton a year ago and is now over $210. They are having severe electricity issues due to coal shortages that is reaking havoc on everything. Some areas are only allowing factories to run 2 or 3 days a week. I read 60 percent of their electricity comes from coal and with current prices plants are not profitable and taking huge losses.  

China pledged to being carbon neutral by 2060. So coal should be going away anyways.

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15 hours ago, Chrisrotary12 said:

Can you provide the report this is from?

This is connected to the Task Force for Climate Related Disclosure (TCFD). TCFD defines climate-related risk as either Physical or Transitional. 

For physical risk, physical risk can either be defined as acute or chronic. Acute being weather as we know it, but with the increased ferocity of weather events that is expected to be realized as the climate changes. Chronic being connected to rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, etc.

Transitional risk centers around identify those financial investments that may ultimately be stranded as the economy transitions from high- to low-carbon intensive.

TCFD is designed to assist financial institution with also identifying opportunities for sound financial investment in changing economy.

 

Here you go, gotta create a free account to read it tho:

https://www.ceres.org/resources/reports/financing-net-zero-economy-consequences-physical-climate-risk-banks

 

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At the risk of beating a dead horse....this is the 1st year that unsubsidized flood insurance takes effect.  Increases are limited to like I dunno $1,300 a year or something....but in 30 yrs there are going to be places that become unaffordable to many (assuming no further legislation).... So at least before it becomes uninhabitable my bet is that coastal areas gentrify at an exceptional rate. There is a certain segment of the population that has no problem paying $30k cash a yr for flood insurance... while the less fortunate get pushed inland.

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29 minutes ago, Supernovice said:

At the risk of beating a dead horse....this is the 1st year that unsubsidized flood insurance takes effect.  Increases are limited to like I dunno $1,300 a year or something....but in 30 yrs there are going to be places that become unaffordable to many (assuming no further legislation).... So at least before it becomes uninhabitable my bet is that coastal areas gentrify at an exceptional rate. There is a certain segment of the population that has no problem paying $30k cash a yr for flood insurance... while the less fortunate get pushed inland.

What does this mean for places like Florida and Louisiana which have lots of people living in low lying areas? The Florida coast is densely populated, so do millions of people suddenly see their flood insurance premiums spike?

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16 minutes ago, snowman21 said:

What does this mean for places like Florida and Louisiana which have lots of people living in low lying areas? The Florida coast is densely populated, so do millions of people suddenly see their flood insurance premiums spike?

Short answer Yes- by the maximum 1 year increase allowed under law until they reach the market rate. Which for most is 25-30 yrs.

Just googled 'flood insurance increase' and the first link is KATC- Louisiana.

https://www.katc.com/news/covering-louisiana/most-louisiana-homeowners-can-expect-an-increase-in-flood-insurance

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5 hours ago, Chrisrotary12 said:

China pledged to being carbon neutral by 2060. So coal should be going away anyways.

I highly doubt China is enduring rolling blackouts and factory closures to meet their carbon limits. Maybe you missed the latest headline? I would presume that anything mentioned meeting climate protocols was merely a cover story.

"Bloomberg reports that China’s central government officials "ordered the country’s top state-owned energy companies to secure supplies for this winter at all costs.""

And what exactly will China be replacing coal with to meet their energy needs?

 

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10 hours ago, BrianW said:

The supply chain issues are going to get much worse. The price of coal in China was $50 a ton a year ago and is now over $210. They are having severe electricity issues due to coal shortages that is reaking havoc on everything. Some areas are only allowing factories to run 2 or 3 days a week. I read 60 percent of their electricity comes from coal and with current prices plants are not profitable and taking huge losses.  

I went to two different Verizon stores today and they basically have no phones in stock! 
 

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1 hour ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

I went to two different Verizon stores today and they basically have no phones in stock! 
 

Home Depot and Lowes around here have big shortages of common plumbing parts. Had to drive all over looking for a sink basket strainer and some drain parts. 

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2 hours ago, CoastalWx said:

Longshoremen get paid well I thought. The employment money ran out. What are these people doing?

A little research shows its a multifaceted problem. Too much demand for the infrastructure to handle. Trucks need specific rigs to haul containers and they are in short supply. The restocking of the world after lockdown has created more demand than the ports can handle. Not a longshoreman issue but more of an infrastructure issue it seems.

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1 hour ago, Ginx snewx said:

A little research shows its a multifaceted problem. Too much demand for the infrastructure to handle. Trucks need specific rigs to haul containers and they are in short supply. The restocking of the world after lockdown has created more demand than the ports can handle. Not a longshoreman issue but more of an infrastructure issue it seems.

It’s also a labor issue in so much as a lot of long haul truck drivers are burnt out and finding other employment.  The same with warehouse workers.  

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5 minutes ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

It’s also a labor issue in so much as a lot of long haul truck drivers are burnt out and finding other employment.  The same with warehouse workers.  

True, basically jobs are open because people don't want them I guess. Its not that there isn't people available 

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1 hour ago, Ginx snewx said:

A little research shows its a multifaceted problem. Too much demand for the infrastructure to handle. Trucks need specific rigs to haul containers and they are in short supply. The restocking of the world after lockdown has created more demand than the ports can handle. Not a longshoreman issue but more of an infrastructure issue it seems.

It is definitely a mix of issues. Infrastructure, labor, too much of some materials in some places, not enough in others.

 

Will take a couple of years to sort out methinks

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