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Damage In Tolland

Heavy heavy lawn thread 2019

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Saw a few gypsy pillars last week, and with so many oaks in the yard nearly bare, it must be years of gypsy damage. Also looked at the gypsy damage maps available and there were a few reports  locally.

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23 hours ago, Lava Rock said:

First cut on the new hydroseed last night. Disregard lower left brown spot as they was plow damage from this winter that was reseeded 3 wks ago. Overall, I'm not that impressed. Lots of thin areas and some without shoots. It's been cold until recent, so maybe it'll start growing faster IDK. A few hot days, and this will probably go to junk. Pretty much have had it with lawn projects that don't succeed very well.

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Last October I mentioned that it was dicey hydroseeding at that time of year.  Friends who have had their lawns hydroseeded in late September or October had poor results. Try finding a grass seed by the name of perennial pacemaker. You will probably have to go to a good lawn and garden center. The seeds germinate quickly. And it's a good grass for both sun and shady areas. And it does well in area that are difficult to grow grass in. 

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2 hours ago, IrishRob17 said:

I have a red maple that is around 8 or 9 years old, appeared very healthy last year and the years before.  It has buds but no leaves this year.  There were a number of shoots that shot out from the trunk that I removed but still still nothing on any of the branches.  I'm hoping its not done altogether as in a couple of years it'll would provide some nice shade to part of the yard.  Any thoughts from far away?

Does not sound good.  A young open-grown tree that produces those side shoots is probably a tree in trouble, trying to save itself.  I f any of those buds are within reach, try splitting a couple with your nails (or with a knife, carefully.)  If they're green inside, there's hope.  I'm assuming it was planted 8-9 years ago, not grown from seed in your yard.  Is it the native red maple, or the variety of Norway maple that has red foliage?  (May not make much difference, though.)  Has anything changed near that tree?  Soil compaction, root damage, change in water table, reaction to lawn chemicals?

Kev/Scott:  That oak also looks to be in trouble, unless it's merely showing the initial work of this spring's feeding by gypsy moth larvae.  Otherwise, something looks to be killing some high-in-crown branches, and that often portends continued dieback.  Hope that's not the case.

Trees are usually tough, but odd things can happen.  There was a very healthy looking pin oak growing in front of the Coke bottling plant in Farmington (Maine), a tree about 15" diameter and 40' tall that had lovely red foliage each fall.  (IMO, pin oak has the best fall color of any oak.)   Then spring 2 years ago it completely failed to leaf out, and in late summer was removed.  I've no idea what caused its death.

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38 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Does not sound good.  A young open-grown tree that produces those side shoots is probably a tree in trouble, trying to save itself.  I f any of those buds are within reach, try splitting a couple with your nails (or with a knife, carefully.)  If they're green inside, there's hope.  I'm assuming it was planted 8-9 years ago, not grown from seed in your yard.  Is it the native red maple, or the variety of Norway maple that has red foliage?  (May not make much difference, though.)  Has anything changed near that tree?  Soil compaction, root damage, change in water table, reaction to lawn chemicals?

 

Thanks for the response. You’re confirming all of what I’ve read :( .  No changes to chemicals or anything, been using and doing the same things since it was planted as a sapling years ago. The buds don’t look but there appears to be some green under the outside layer of bark, I’m hoping that’s a good sign. We shall see. 

F92D0BC8-4ED6-4AAB-A6BE-533CF513E923.jpeg

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I think I answered my own suspicion. I just zoomed in from standing underneath the tree and you can see all the new leaves already chewed and the holes and the dead stuff. If you are on your phone.. zoom in. This is the earliest they’ve hit. This is year 3, so it appears they’ve gotten the trees . Also see the blown down leaves with all the holes .

NJkmNyH.jpg

PblVmxd.jpg

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On 5/24/2019 at 4:59 AM, moneypitmike said:

What are the thoughts of when to fertilize again (I also need one that has broad-leaf control to take out some clover and such)?

Thanks!

bump

Is there any type of pre-emergent crabgrass prevention that can also control existing broad-leaf crap?  It would be great to do this in one fell swoop.  I think my seeded areas have effectively 'emerged' so I don't need to worry about that too much.

 

TIA.

 

 

14 hours ago, tamarack said:

 

Kev/Scott:  That oak also looks to be in trouble, unless it's merely showing the initial work of this spring's feeding by gypsy moth larvae.  Otherwise, something looks to be killing some high-in-crown branches, and that often portends continued dieback.  Hope that's not the case.

 

image.png.8699d7d29f341e4acf5e088687b44aa1.png

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Hopefully I don’t jinx it, but I don’t see any gypsy moths and it appears the winter moth caterpillars or whatever those little green worms are....pretty much not apparent. I think I saw one of them. Those things up into a couple of years ago, would tear the oaks apart. Seems like whatever that fungus is, had got them.

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2 hours ago, moneypitmike said:

bump

Is there any type of pre-emergent crabgrass prevention that can also control existing broad-leaf crap?  It would be great to do this in one fell swoop.  I think my seeded areas have effectively 'emerged' so I don't need to worry about that too much.

 

TIA.

 

 

image.png.8699d7d29f341e4acf5e088687b44aa1.png

Mike--you need to wait until your newly seeded area is more established before pre-emerg. Suppose to wait until it matures a bit--meaning those little stringy grass blades get 3 or 4 tillers. Pre-emerg target small immature plants, including grass.  They dont actually stop stuff for germinating, but attack them when they are young and small. 

There is one product at big box stores that Scott's sells that you can use that provides pre emerg and work kill grass seed. It's a starter fert with mesotrione as the active ingredient

 

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3 minutes ago, backedgeapproaching said:

Mike--you need to wait until your newly seeded area is more established before pre-emerg. Suppose to wait until it matures a bit--meaning those little stringy grass blades get 3 or 4 tillers. Pre-emerg target small immature plants, including grass.  They dont actually stop stuff for germinating, but attack them when they are young and small. 

There is one product at big box stores that Scott's sells that you can use that provides pre emerg and work kill grass seed. It's a starter fert with mesotrione as the active ingredient

 

Thanks.  Maybe I should wait on anything that's pre-emergent and just find something that does-in broad leaf stuff (clovers, dandelionis, unknown).

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16 hours ago, IrishRob17 said:

Thanks for the response. You’re confirming all of what I’ve read :( .  No changes to chemicals or anything, been using and doing the same things since it was planted as a sapling years ago. The buds don’t look but there appears to be some green under the outside layer of bark, I’m hoping that’s a good sign. We shall see. 

F92D0BC8-4ED6-4AAB-A6BE-533CF513E923.jpeg

If there's no green in the buds, I'm pessimistic, but I'd wait until July before giving up.  :cry:
And that pic confirms that it's not a Norway maple; if it were, I'd not be all that worried about losing an invasive, but it looks like a native maple. 


Oaks are fine here. Big ol’ leaves.

Looking good here, too, though the leaves are only about 2" long - everything is late and this morning's 31-32 didn't help.

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I remember my Dad planting a Japanese Maple when I was 3, it was about 3 foot tall. 59 years later it is 30 feet tall and beautiful.  A favorite climbing tree from me to the grandkids. Sadly not in our family anymore but oh the tails that tree could tell.

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11 hours ago, tamarack said:

If there's no green in the buds, I'm pessimistic, but I'd wait until July before giving up.  :cry:
And that pic confirms that it's not a Norway maple; if it were, I'd not be all that worried about losing an invasive, but it looks like a native maple. 


Oaks are fine here. Big ol’ leaves.

Looking good here, too, though the leaves are only about 2" long - everything is late and this morning's 31-32 didn't help.

So I’m guessing it’s safe to say that if it doesn’t leaf out at all this season it’s a goner?  You, or anyone else, have thoughts on the hybrid Autumn Blaze Maple?  

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I think I answered my own suspicion. I just zoomed in from standing underneath the tree and you can see all the new leaves already chewed and the holes and the dead stuff. If you are on your phone.. zoom in. This is the earliest they’ve hit. This is year 3, so it appears they’ve gotten the trees . Also see the blown down leaves with all the holes .
NJkmNyH.jpg&key=8abbadca7e3eeb9ad1ec97c73ef485dde06e5f924c87fa7d39eee3e6268a5be0
PblVmxd.jpg&key=a491457f809e5f30e976c553cd6220dbe8485a143c9a4842389507745afb53e4
That's too bad.

.

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21 minutes ago, Lava Rock said:

Who buys such a tree?

.
 

Rich Massholes coming up to the Lake to their lake homes.

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2 hours ago, dendrite said:

Rich Massholes coming up to the Lake to their lake homes.

Previous owners of the house we are in now, put in a similar tree. Has to be worth thousands. 

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6 hours ago, Ginx snewx said:

I remember my Dad planting a Japanese Maple when I was 3, it was about 3 foot tall. 59 years later it is 30 feet tall and beautiful.  A favorite climbing tree from me to the grandkids. Sadly not in our family anymore but oh the tails that tree could tell.

My folks planted one in their yard when my brother was born. It's as tall as the house now and a beautiful tree. Who knew all the seedlings they pull every year could be so valuable with a little more tending?

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15 hours ago, IrishRob17 said:

So I’m guessing it’s safe to say that if it doesn’t leaf out at all this season it’s a goner?  You, or anyone else, have thoughts on the hybrid Autumn Blaze Maple?  

'Fraid so.  
Had never heard of autumn blaze so I looked it up.  Seems highly regarded for fast growth, moderate size, fall color, and tolerance to urban conditions.  It's a hybrid of red and silver maples, and the piece I read (which could've worked as ad copy for selling this variety, so maybe check several sources) said that it kept the strength of red maple, which is far better at resisting snow/ice breakage than silver.  

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11 minutes ago, tamarack said:

'Fraid so.  
Had never heard of autumn blaze so I looked it up.  Seems highly regarded for fast growth, moderate size, fall color, and tolerance to urban conditions.  It's a hybrid of red and silver maples, and the piece I read (which could've worked as ad copy for selling this variety, so maybe check several sources) said that it kept the strength of red maple, which is far better at resisting snow/ice breakage than silver.  

I may give one a shot this fall, my concern was strength.  

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I have a couple Red Sunset Maples I planted.  They were 8-10’ when I did, they are around 20’ now with a large canopy.  Caterpillars don’t seem to bother them.

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