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Damage In Tolland

Heavy heavy lawn thread 2019

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16 minutes ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

Preference, sure. I have too much area to have to scrape off old and lay down new mulch every season. 

Working on the front now with tree planting next week.

I don’t really care for mulch either. I just spread several yards of p stone under the deck and along the back of the house to help with drainage and to form a base for an eventual patio. Expensive, but looks great. Considering using stone as an alternative to mulch once I get the grass down and start doing some planting’s.

 

Mulch loses its appeal quick... and needs to be done every single year.

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Stone can be a good alternative in some spots, but need to be careful. Otherwise your yard will look like something from El Paso.

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People saturate their lawns with chemicals and that leads to the lawn  becoming dependent on the chemicals. And in general those chemicals aren't very safe. Best thing to do is to use organic fertilizer, leave the lawn at 3 inches or more  after a mow and water deeply but infrequently. Of course mother nature may have her own thoughts on the water schedule. 

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1 hour ago, TauntonBlizzard2013 said:

I don’t really care for mulch either. I just spread several yards of p stone under the deck and along the back of the house to help with drainage and to form a base for an eventual patio. Expensive, but looks great. Considering using stone as an alternative to mulch once I get the grass down and start doing some planting’s.

 

Mulch loses its appeal quick... and needs to be done every single year.

Yea. I’ll have to show a before and after pic when I’m finished but it looks awesome so far. I planted a couple abroviteas on the back walkway with the sand colored stones and people always comment how nice it looks. Even my neighbor is going stone this year after years of muscling mulch around. 

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the downside with rocks is inevitable weed growth. I am sure you put a barrier underneath it, but weeds, especially crabgrass don’t need much sand/dirt/soil to grow. So with rocks you have to constantly pull weeds and/or spray them with chemicals. mulch itself acts as a weed barrier, assuming you put down a heavy layer. I agree that they look good at first though

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9 minutes ago, SJonesWX said:

the downside with rocks is inevitable weed growth. I am sure you put a barrier underneath it, but weeds, especially crabgrass don’t need much sand/dirt/soil to grow. So with rocks you have to constantly pull weeds and/or spray them with chemicals. mulch itself acts as a weed barrier, assuming you put down a heavy layer. I agree that they look good at first though

I put down two layers of weed barrier but yes the occassional weed/grass sprout happens especially last summer season. I never use harsh spray chemicals to kill. Only boiling water/vinegar mixture if it gets too bad.

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Got seed down on the front lawn last evening; hopefully that will fill in some rough areas and generally provide some further density.

I had a landscaper take a look at the backyard disaster.  Grading, filling, removal of a lot of crap.  Still waiting on an estimate. 

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25 minutes ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

So why the hate for such beautiful evergreens?

They're ugly, they smell horrendous, they shed a shit ton, and they grow like a weed.

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1 hour ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

They're ugly, they smell horrendous, they shed a shit ton, and they grow like a weed.

That proves that "scents sense" can vary hugely.  I find the aroma of both foliage and wood to be quite pleasant, though eastern redcedar is even better.  I'm no fan of some of the weird arborvitae cultivars sold by the nurseries, but as a forest tree (Northern white cedar) it's a critical component of deer wintering areas and makes great shingles, too.  (It's also the siding on our house - 3-sided "logs" that add 3-5" insulation.)

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2 hours ago, Lava Rock said:

Forsynthia not bloomed yet. Would it be too early to put down fertilizer with crabgrass prevention?

.
 

Most likely. Soil temps tell the story of you know what they are around you but they must still be low if forsythia hasn’t bloomed yet. I put mine down once soil temps are consistently in the low to mid 50s. 

https://www.lesco.com/blog/post/2018-02-26/pre-emergent-application-timing-tips

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