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Spring/Summer 2021 Banter/Complaint Thread


madwx
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8 hours ago, Hoosier said:

For some positive spin...

From a feel perspective, temps x degrees below average in May are easier to tolerate than the same departure below average in April.  Yeah, maybe it's not ideal swimming weather.

Some (myself included) would argue that temps 10-15 degrees below average in May are easier to tolerate than temps 10-15 degrees above average in May. For many locations in this sub, 15 degrees below average is highs still well into the 50s in early May and 15 degrees above is highs well into the 80s. I know which one I like better.

The problem is I also like thunderstorms and it’s considerably easier to get them in the warmer pattern vs. the colder one.

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I think it would actually take a miracle to get a colder than average summer at ORD this year.

Not sure when the new 1991-2020 normals go into effect though.  If it's not for many months, then we may have departures that end up getting adjusted retroactively.

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June has historically been the most active month locally. Hopefully May picks up after next week and June is rocking. If you can go into June having already had an active season, that's a bonus.

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2 hours ago, StormfanaticInd said:

Looking like another non severe weather spring 

Look on the bright side, they added another layer of blue to the map through the 9th and added more blue area through the 14th.  It’s not the darker shades yet but give it time.

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19 hours ago, StormfanaticInd said:

Looking like another non severe weather spring 

 

19 hours ago, CheeselandSkies said:

We'll see how things look in a month, but would have been nice if things would have gotten going a bit earlier.

 

It's been a banner severe weather spring for Dixie Alley though. 

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13 minutes ago, CheeselandSkies said:

Seems like it's a given there every spring. Plains/MW not so much.

* I will say, awfully nice to come on here and see five weather threads above "Coronavirus."

Nice to be so close to the GOM like they are.  A duck can fart and you get good moisture return in Dixie.  Obviously there can be other problems in a given severe wx setup, but they don't have to deal with that one as much as areas farther north/west.

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Yeah I was right on the fringe of the rain for most of the day, just miles to the north it was steady. My temp really shot up mid-morning from 52F to 68F in just a few hours. The evening was good but increasing clouds then some lightning streaks and rain a hour ago.

About the movie Twister, something I never understood was when the group is in Wakita after the F4 tore through, the final boss baddy F5 is "just forming" and you can see radar imagery of the supercell in question on a screen briefly. Well this is basically nearly in the middle of the night and then somehow the team travels somewhere overnight (??) and then catches up with the in-progress F5 tornado that is what we assume to be mid-morning or early afternoon. Even for Twister, this goes too off the rails and even a normie is scratching his/her head over that. Wiki has, "When a record-breaking F5 tornado is predicted to hit the next morning, Bill has the idea to use the rubble to allow for Dorothy 3 and 4 to be more aerodynamic." :lol: I also loved Dusty telling Bill and Jo the NSSL is predicting an F5 tornado in the morning :)

Unfortunately the director's commentary doesn't explain anything on that,  and using the fun-to-read plot write from the anyone can edit site, "The next day, the F5 is revealed to be “at least a mile wide” and has recorded wind speeds of over 300 miles per hour." :huh:. The question is, what on earth is the writer attempting to convey here? Did the F5 form in the middle of the night while the group was in Wakita and somehow stay the same for more than 10 hours, or did the NSSL and other forecasting bodies just predict a supercell that would produce a violent tornado? If you watch the scene its first mentioned its hinted the tornado is already on the ground, especially that radio report.

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Still love that movie. Love the soundtrack too. Remember when it first came out at blockbuster I was 12 and it was rented out. I ran back home to get more money and buy it on VHS instead. Still try to save it yearly to watch it when our first somewhat severe tstorm comes at night in spring which hasn’t yet. Maybe later this evening finally lol
 

Speaking about F5s..

 

I’ve been rereading the May 22 2011 Joplin Tornado thread.

What was strange is on pg 25 someone posted about the El Reno Tornado.... with it’s ef-5 rating being measured on radar. 
 

Couple posts down someone replied saying it’s because a research team used a mobile radar  and got it’s surface to near surface measurements close to it.
 

I was thinking wait wasn’t the El Reno Tornado in 2013? Are posters able to go back and edit their posts?  
 

Started double checking and saw there was another “ef5” in El Reno in 2011.. similar circumstances to the 2013 one. That’s remarkable.

Surprised that slipped away from me. Was probably more focused back then on the April 27 outbreak and Joplin and completely glanced over the 2011 El Reno one being a ef5.

 

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1 hour ago, Castaway said:

Still love that movie. Love the soundtrack too. Remember when it first came out at blockbuster I was 12 and it was rented out. I ran back home to get more money and buy it on VHS instead. Still try to save it yearly to watch it when our first somewhat severe tstorm comes at night in spring which hasn’t yet. Maybe later this evening finally lol

Which side of the F5 debate do you fall on regarding the last one in the movie? On the ground at night or just forecast to be a future F5?

Yes that El Reno EF5 in 2011 isn't mentioned much and is possibly the least talked about EF5 of that decade. The truly forgotten modern F5 is the Birmingham tornado in 1997 that leveled neighborhoods.

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2 hours ago, Castaway said:

Still love that movie. Love the soundtrack too. Remember when it first came out at blockbuster I was 12 and it was rented out. I ran back home to get more money and buy it on VHS instead. Still try to save it yearly to watch it when our first somewhat severe tstorm comes at night in spring which hasn’t yet. Maybe later this evening finally lol
 

Speaking about F5s..

 

I’ve been rereading the May 22 2011 Joplin Tornado thread.

What was strange is on pg 25 someone posted about the El Reno Tornado.... with it’s ef-5 rating being measured on radar. 
 

Couple posts down someone replied saying it’s because a research team used a mobile radar  and got it’s surface to near surface measurements close to it.
 

I was thinking wait wasn’t the El Reno Tornado in 2013? Are posters able to go back and edit their posts?  
 

Started double checking and saw there was another “ef5” in El Reno in 2011.. similar circumstances to the 2013 one. That’s remarkable.

Surprised that slipped away from me. Was probably more focused back then on the April 27 outbreak and Joplin and completely glanced over the 2011 El Reno one being a ef5.

 

El Reno 2011 may have been the most impressive EF5 since the enhanced-Fujita scale was introduced (along with Parkersburg 2008). The debris granulation and hurling/mangling of vehicles and large industrial equipment were on a level seen in only the most violent tornadoes. I don't believe any of the house damage was rated EF5 but only because they (per usual) were being extremely nit-picky with spacing of anchor bolts and what not, but with the contextual damage combined with the radar data they pretty much couldn't avoid rating it EF5. It was one of three tornadoes in Oklahoma that day that were at least as, if not more violent than any that infamous day three days shy of a month prior. It was very close to being another horrific disaster for the OKC metro, but El Reno missed to the north/west and the one that was tracking up I-44 toward Moore/Norman/Newcastle lifted just before it reached there (although, it only bought them a two-year reprieve).

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3 hours ago, Torchageddon said:

Which side of the F5 debate do you fall on regarding the last one in the movie? On the ground at night or just forecast to be a future F5?

Yes that El Reno EF5 in 2011 isn't mentioned much and is possibly the least talked about EF5 of that decade. The truly forgotten modern F5 is the Birmingham tornado in 1997 that leveled neighborhoods.

Forecasted to be a future F5 lol. Googled extra info earlier and came across this:

 “The 1996 Oklahoma F-5 tornado was a major tornado that touched down 25 miles SE of Wakita, Oklahoma. 
 

The F-5 twister is the strongest tornado with wind speeds up to 300+MPH, the tornado developed after two systems (The F-4 Wakita tornado and one unknown system), the twister spawned in a field and believed the base was a mile wide.”

 

Saw this as a tribute to Bill Paxton and thought it was cool

CADB31BC-4B78-4BD0-B0C2-B5854168FD36.jpeg

 

https://mobile.twitter.com/Aaron_Brackett/status/835943665046540288?ref_src=twsrc^tfw|twcamp^tweetembed|twterm^835943665046540288|twgr^|twcon^s1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fd-35557552943106266237.ampproject.net%2F2104170104001%2Fframe.html

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One place that saw a slight decrease in average snowfall is Indianapolis, going from 25.9" to 25.5".  It's driven by a notable drop in Fall snowfall, as Winter and Spring snow went up a bit.  The October drop in snowfall is mainly because the freak 1989 event is no longer part of the averages.  Even one event can have an outsized impact on a monthly average when it's so incredibly anomalous.

 

What Has Changed Locally with the New 1991-2020 Normals?

 

Indianapolis Area (IND)

 

Temperature:

  • All months except November experienced increases in average temperature
  • Greatest increase in December: +1.7°
  • All other months saw increases of 0.5° to 1.0°
  • Increases in maximum and minimum temperatures were largely uniform, but there were several months where the minimum temp increases were greater
  • 3 months with largest average temperature increases (December, May and September) experienced the greatest rises in minimum temperatures
  • Seasonal average temperatures increased in all seasons (0.4° to 0.9°)
  • Greatest increase in winter season (DJF)
  • Annually, the average temperature rose 0.5°

 

Precipitation and Snowfall:

  • January and April experienced the greatest increases in precipitation amounts around 0.5”
  • Largest drops in monthly precipitation occurred in May, November and December (0.25” to 0.5”)
  • Precipitation increased in winter (DJF), spring (MAM) and summer (JJA); decreased slightly in fall (SON)
  • Greatest seasonal increase during the summer (+0.64”)
  • Annual precipitation has increased 1.19”
  • Snow averages have decreased substantially in October and November with a minor drop in February
  • The late fall drop in snow is largely responsible for the annual snowfall average lowering 0.4” from 25.9” to 25.5”
  • Subtle increases in snowfall average for December, January and March
  • Seasonal increase of 0.3” snow in winter and 0.6” in spring; decrease of 1.3” in fall
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On 4/29/2021 at 11:22 PM, Hoosier said:

For some positive spin...

From a feel perspective, temps x degrees below average in May are easier to tolerate than the same departure below average in April.  Yeah, maybe it's not ideal swimming weather.

Screws thunderstorm season for me though.  June and July are usually dry lake shadow months recently, while April and May have enough wind flow to get elevated storms over the lake... if there is a good warm sector.  Honestly tired of these troughs all the time.  They're not as cold as they used to be due to AGW, but they seem to be more persistent.  

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On 5/2/2021 at 11:55 PM, Torchageddon said:

Yeah I was right on the fringe of the rain for most of the day, just miles to the north it was steady. My temp really shot up mid-morning from 52F to 68F in just a few hours. The evening was good but increasing clouds then some lightning streaks and rain a hour ago.

About the movie Twister, something I never understood was when the group is in Wakita after the F4 tore through, the final boss baddy F5 is "just forming" and you can see radar imagery of the supercell in question on a screen briefly. Well this is basically nearly in the middle of the night and then somehow the team travels somewhere overnight (??) and then catches up with the in-progress F5 tornado that is what we assume to be mid-morning or early afternoon. Even for Twister, this goes too off the rails and even a normie is scratching his/her head over that. Wiki has, "When a record-breaking F5 tornado is predicted to hit the next morning, Bill has the idea to use the rubble to allow for Dorothy 3 and 4 to be more aerodynamic." :lol: I also loved Dusty telling Bill and Jo the NSSL is predicting an F5 tornado in the morning :)

Unfortunately the director's commentary doesn't explain anything on that,  and using the fun-to-read plot write from the anyone can edit site, "The next day, the F5 is revealed to be “at least a mile wide” and has recorded wind speeds of over 300 miles per hour." :huh:. The question is, what on earth is the writer attempting to convey here? Did the F5 form in the middle of the night while the group was in Wakita and somehow stay the same for more than 10 hours, or did the NSSL and other forecasting bodies just predict a supercell that would produce a violent tornado? If you watch the scene its first mentioned its hinted the tornado is already on the ground, especially that radio report.

It's written for California normies who confuse hurricanes and tornadoes.  Normies who live anywhere near tornado ally at least know tornadoes aren't things that can be predicted like that.  They only tend to believe things like their town is protected because "they always go north... follow the river... stop by the hills... etc".  I don't necessarily blame people for wanting to believe they are safe for unscientific reasons, but they'd be closer to reality just saying God protected them... as that works as a more believable fill-in for a phenomena that's fundamentally pretty damn random.

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