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11 minutes ago, RogueWaves said:

So, as said, this is was a comment posted on a you-tube video. People rarely use their real names. The Mr. Kalani identified in the opening section could've been his real name or the poster had simply obtained it elsewhere; wasn't clear. I work in industry where PPE is frequently used during manufacturing processes and governed by OSHA regulations. Nothing written in that strikes me as suspect or wacko. It states the intended uses for certain mask types and their known limitations for any other purpose. Just making some more information available to take into consideration, that's all. 

This link is about some scientific studies about the efficacy of masks and respirators in preventing spread of viruses such as C-19. Hope that helps.

https://technocracy.news/censored-a-review-of-science-relevant-to-covid-19-social-policy-and-why-face-masks-dont-work/

Technocracy.news promotes the theory that vaccines cause autism. Hard pass. 

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13 minutes ago, RogueWaves said:

So, as said, this is was a comment posted on a you-tube video. People rarely use their real names. The Mr. Kalani identified in the opening section could've been his real name or the poster had simply obtained it elsewhere; wasn't clear. I work in industry where PPE is frequently used during manufacturing processes and governed by OSHA regulations. Nothing written in that strikes me as suspect or wacko. It states the intended uses for certain mask types and their known limitations for any other purpose. Just making some more information available to take into consideration, that's all. 

This link is about some scientific studies about the efficacy of masks and respirators in preventing spread of viruses such as C-19. Hope that helps.

https://technocracy.news/censored-a-review-of-science-relevant-to-covid-19-social-policy-and-why-face-masks-dont-work/

I totally believe that some types of face coverings are better than others, and you have to know how to use them so you don't inadvertently infect yourself.  It's harder to sell me on the idea that no type of face covering is ever effective.  If that's the case, then there's no reason for hospital workers to ever wear masks.

The info at your link looks a little long.  Read part of it and may come back to it later.  I will say that the guy complaining at the outset about censorship is not a good look, but that's beside the point. 

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As testing becomes quicker and easier, you're obviously going to see more cases.

I would strictly look at positive test rates and deaths. Is there really any usable data from simply looking at cases? 

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34 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

I totally believe that some types of face coverings are better than others, and you have to know how to use them so you don't inadvertently infect yourself.  It's harder to sell me on the idea that no type of face covering is ever effective.  If that's the case, then there's no reason for hospital workers to ever wear masks.

The info at your link looks a little long.  Read part of it and may come back to it later.  I will say that the guy complaining at the outset about censorship is not a good look, but that's beside the point. 

While the author of the "OSHA 101" write-up could be taken as anti-mask, I think he/they were more so just giving Peeps a heads-up that many folks masking are not in touch with the proper use of them, nor the various ways they are (or are not) truly effective. Even prior to C-19 my local hospital's walk-in clinic asked anyone coming inside sick/coughing/contagious to grab one of those medical type masks and wear it while there to get checked out. It's a small closed in lobby, not well ventilated so that's always made sense to me. Certainly use them in similar situations but dispose of/wash them depending on their type in appropriate manner.

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24 minutes ago, Jonger said:

As testing becomes quicker and easier, you're obviously going to see more cases.

I would strictly look at positive test rates and deaths. Is there really any usable data from simply looking at cases? 

Agree, total "positives" means little since we've been aware since day 1 many carriers weren't sick, or sick enough, to warrant a test. Personally, I've always focused on the fatalities (against a typical flu season and other historical outbreaks) more than cases. Obviously, the more that test (+) and don't succumb or even fall seriously ill, the lower that over all death rate gets. Thru selective/limited testing the numbers looked horrible scary ofc.

It will be very interesting to see where this ends up when all is said and done (if someone ever publishes an update of this):

 

COVID-19 vs other viruses.PNG

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53 minutes ago, RobertSul said:

Technocracy.news promotes the theory that vaccines cause autism. Hard pass. 

Sooo, in your mind, since they got that wrong they get everything wrong?? "Even a broken clock is right twice a day." One of our fave sayings around here, lol.

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1 hour ago, Stebo said:

If this doesn't scare people I don't know what will.

image.png.65c174c9f28a6929ca4465d87c5628d5.png

My older sister and hubby were expected in state for a sibling's (delayed by 'rona) funeral/burial. She's 70+ with recent other health battles so to me they are right in their concerns. No need to tempt fate when that's your situation. Sucks, and they'll be missed by the rest of us, but fully understood too.

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1 hour ago, RogueWaves said:

Sooo, in your mind, since they got that wrong they get everything wrong?? "Even a broken clock is right twice a day." One of our fave sayings around here, lol.

I mean, you’re right that I shouldn’t base an entire website on a few pieces of faulty news (another look shows they don’t believe that CO2 is a greenhouse gas), but also the fact that surgeons always wear masks at the operating table lends credence to their effectiveness. There’ve also been many anecdotes of entire floors of hospital staff wearing masks and having a very low infection rate compared with staff on separate floors who didn’t wear masks and had a high infection rate. 
 

Also, Japan hasn’t been hit as hard despite how urbanized/densely populated/advanced aged of a country they are - which has been attributable to them being a very mask-friendly society. 

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2 hours ago, Stebo said:

If this doesn't scare people I don't know what will.

image.png.65c174c9f28a6929ca4465d87c5628d5.png

We already learned in the NE that reacting to sharp rises in cases means any mask or shutdown measures are too little, too late. Now is the part where pre symptomatic or asymptomatic people are infecting their friends and families. 

The longer we keep making these mistakes, the longer it will take to get back to business “as usual”. 

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2 hours ago, RobertSul said:

I mean, you’re right that I shouldn’t base an entire website on a few pieces of faulty news (another look shows they don’t believe that CO2 is a greenhouse gas), but also the fact that surgeons always wear masks at the operating table lends credence to their effectiveness. There’ve also been many anecdotes of entire floors of hospital staff wearing masks and having a very low infection rate compared with staff on separate floors who didn’t wear masks and had a high infection rate. 
 

Also, Japan hasn’t been hit as hard despite how urbanized/densely populated/advanced aged of a country they are - which has been attributable to them being a very mask-friendly society. 

Japanese have low prevalence of heart disease, diabetes and obesity in general. As someone in the science field, do you really think that's apples to apples?

 

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10 minutes ago, Jonger said:

Japanese have low prevalence of heart disease, diabetes and obesity in general. As someone in the science field, do you really think that's apples to apples?

 

Good health obviously helps but they have much higher population density than most of this country outside of a handful of ZIP codes.

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1 minute ago, Stebo said:

Good health obviously helps but they have much higher population density than most of this country outside of a handful of ZIP codes.

The mask culture plus amazing health compared to our population..... add those up and that's more than likely 95% of it.

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1 minute ago, Jonger said:

The mask culture plus amazing health compared to our population..... add those up and that's more than likely 95% of it.

Maybe for mortality rate, but catch rate this is still contagious the same way.

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46 minutes ago, Jonger said:

Japanese have low prevalence of heart disease, diabetes and obesity in general. As someone in the science field, do you really think that's apples to apples?

 

That would allude to lower death rates, not lower transmission rates. The median age in Japan is 47.3, vs. U.S.A’s 38.2.  That’s a big difference. 

Also:

Japan has 149 cases per million, total.

USA has 8,571 cases per million, total. 
 

 

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3 hours ago, RobertSul said:

That would allude to lower death rates, not lower transmission rates. The median age in Japan is 47.3, vs. U.S.A’s 38.2.  That’s a big difference. 

Also:

Japan has 149 cases per million, total.

USA has 8,571 cases per million, total. 
 

 

Are you sure compromised immune systems aren't more prone to catching the disease initially? Symptoms like coughing would probably spread the disease like wildfire compared to someome asymptomatic.

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4 hours ago, Jonger said:

Are you sure compromised immune systems aren't more prone to catching the disease initially? Symptoms like coughing would probably spread the disease like wildfire compared to someome asymptomatic.

You mean like older people, which Japan has an abundance of? 

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15 hours ago, Jonger said:

As testing becomes quicker and easier, you're obviously going to see more cases.

I would strictly look at positive test rates and deaths. Is there really any usable data from simply looking at cases? 

Yes, the exponential increase in number of cases does not match the increased rate of testing.

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Texas numbers continuing the bad news

7/1 avail hospital beds:  12,894

7/2 avail hospital beds:  11,983

 

7/1 avail ICU beds:  1,322

7/2 avail ICU beds:  1,181

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Things will peak mid-late July in terms of capacity and chaos. Sadly people who need the beds will not get them(heart attack, car crash ete, elective surgeries are already toast). I think all young men under the age of 40 should not be treated by hospitals. That would free up plenty of room.

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Seems like most states in the region have started to tick up.  Obviously not nearly like what's going on in the southern/western states.  Ohio is probably the biggest concern regionally right now.  

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2 hours ago, Hoosier said:

Seems like most states in the region have started to tick up.  Obviously not nearly like what's going on in the southern/western states.  Ohio is probably the biggest concern regionally right now.  

They were the ones who opened up the most the quickest in the region. Now some people are complacent as if the virus isn't a thing.

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21 hours ago, Angrysummons said:

Things will peak mid-late July in terms of capacity and chaos. Sadly people who need the beds will not get them(heart attack, car crash ete, elective surgeries are already toast). I think all young men under the age of 40 should not be treated by hospitals. That would free up plenty of room.

So if I (34) were to be in a car accident, or were to catch COVID-19 and be one of the unfortunate few in my age group who needs hospital treatment, they should turn me away? Gee. thanks.

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On 7/2/2020 at 5:36 PM, RogueWaves said:

Agree, total "positives" means little since we've been aware since day 1 many carriers weren't sick, or sick enough, to warrant a test. Personally, I've always focused on the fatalities (against a typical flu season and other historical outbreaks) more than cases. Obviously, the more that test (+) and don't succumb or even fall seriously ill, the lower that over all death rate gets. Thru selective/limited testing the numbers looked horrible scary ofc.

It will be very interesting to see where this ends up when all is said and done (if someone ever publishes an update of this):

 

COVID-19 vs other viruses.PNG

The problem with only looking at deaths to estimate the true infection rate is it ignores changes in behavior.  In general older people are being more cautious.  It's mainly 20 and 30 somethings going to bars and parties.  These are the main super-spreading type events.  In Lansing close to 100 cases were linked to a single freaking bar!!!  While the initial infected are mostly mild cases involving young people, when the amount of community spread reaches a certain threshold, older people will be involved again and death rates will climb again.  Many vulnerable people still have to work and shop and they will come in contact with careless spreaders.

Also not that not all non-deadly cases are "mild".  Even people in their 20s who never required hospitalization say it was the worst illness in their life and nobody even knows how long certain problems last.  Many people still have symptoms after 2 months!!!  Even people who were never hospitalized!!!  Many people never know they had it, but others become ill for a protracted period of time.  It isn't a brief illness like the flu.

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One of my cousins (I think it's first cousin twice removed if I have the relationship right) has the virus.  Works at a casino and had been at a bar so odds are he got it at one of those places.  Has a fever but not doing bad overall, at least so far.

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On 7/3/2020 at 4:38 PM, Angrysummons said:

Things will peak mid-late July in terms of capacity and chaos. Sadly people who need the beds will not get them(heart attack, car crash ete, elective surgeries are already toast). I think all young men under the age of 40 should not be treated by hospitals. That would free up plenty of room.

That's almost as ridiculous as the lieutenant Gov. in Texas saying Grandma should sacrifice herself for young people. 

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On 7/3/2020 at 7:40 AM, RyanDe680 said:

Texas numbers continuing the bad news

7/1 avail hospital beds:  12,894

7/2 avail hospital beds:  11,983

 

7/1 avail ICU beds:  1,322

7/2 avail ICU beds:  1,181

Hospital beds today at 13,307

ICU availability 1,203

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Separately FL hospitalization rates are going down.  Hospitalization at 16,201 and ICU avail at 1,302.  
 

interesting.  Especially with cars having gone up in the last month.  Wish there were more demographics on the daily testing.  

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Went grocery shopping this evening (with a mask) and pass in an aisle this obese older man who wasn’t wearing a mask. Right after passing him he begins coughing quite loudly without covering his mouth. Obviously this guy doesn’t care much about his health, so how can we expect those who don’t care about their own health to care in the least about the health of others? That’s a serious problem this pandemic has exposed in the human race. Selfishness accomplishes nothing positive and can only hurt the less-selfish of us.

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