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Obs. : TROPICAL STORM Henri


DotRat_Wx
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19 minutes ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

The infrastructure damage would be unfathomable. 

Correct and the same people who want a cat 2/3 to hit the area will be the same people complaining the most when the power isn't back on within 2 days. 

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1 hour ago, 40/70 Benchmark said:

Where is that, coastal RI?

Hope Valley Ri about 12 miles inland. To me it seems there was a 15 mile wide are in an arc from Charleston Ri to Voluntown Ct that got hit by the degradating NE eyewall.  Apparently there is an area by the Turf Farms on 138 in Richmond that appears to have been hit by rotating winds.

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Just now, OceanStWx said:

They are the eagles. 

I'm not surprised the pines down there took a beating

Oaks as well.  The Gypsy moth ruined and rotted many. This oak looked healthy standing with full leaves in my buds yard in Ashaway. Rotted base. He said massive oak tree damage in the hilly sections of Hopkinton 

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It was interesting how the wind gusts never really came down to the ground in our yard.  For example, one gust was enough to split the 40-50' maple tree in our front yard.  But less than 50 yards away from the tree there are two patio chairs on our deck that didn't move one inch, and still had the cushions on them.  And they were in the same exposed side of the yard.  My wind gauge is at 5' and had a max gust of 17.2. prior to us losing power.  Yet at 60-80', the tree tops were blowing around pretty good.

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18 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

Oaks as well.  The Gypsy moth ruined and rotted many. This oak looked healthy standing with full leaves in my buds yard in Ashaway. Rotted base. He said massive oak tree damage in the hilly sections of Hopkinton 

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Ants . See that on even healthy oaks. Gypsy moth oaks have every kind of pest.

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9 hours ago, Great Snow 1717 said:

Correct and the same people who want a cat 2/3 to hit the area will be the same people complaining the most when the power isn't back on within 2 days. 

In general, New England is in a fortunate position in relation to the ravages of climate change, but our big vulnerability is the increased prospect of an accelerting category 2 or 3 hurricane. That in two or three hours will be one hard knock that will take months/years to recover from. Henri and his trajectory were a warning shot across the bow-- something many times more merciless comes this way...

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50 minutes ago, Hailstoned said:

In general, New England is in a fortunate position in relation to the ravages of climate change, but our big vulnerability is the increased prospect of an accelerting category 2 or 3 hurricane. That in two or three hours will be one hard knock that will take months/years to recover from. Henri and his trajectory were a warning shot across the bow-- something many times more merciless comes this way...

1815 says wtf are you talking about.  Been since 1985 since Ct had a hurricane 

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I don't think we quite know yet how global warming will affect hurricane landfalls in New England.  There seem to be factors in play that would make landfalls both more likely and less likely.  I think the only thing that's truly increasing our chance of a hurricane making landfall is each year goes by that it doesn't happen, lol...

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1 hour ago, Ginx snewx said:

1815 says wtf are you talking about.  Been since 1985 since Ct had a hurricane 

With 1938 conspicuously absent, don't quite catch your drift here. In August, maybe September, tropical systems affecting us may meander relatively harmlessly like Henri, but in a warming world with increased baroclinic instability as the fall season progresses, it's reasonable to surmise that an accelerating major hurricane affecting us is becoming more likely  than but once every century or so.

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1 hour ago, Hailstoned said:

With 1938 conspicuously absent, don't quite catch your drift here. In August, maybe September, tropical systems affecting us may meander relatively harmlessly like Henri, but in a warming world with increased baroclinic instability as the fall season progresses, it's reasonable to surmise that an accelerating major hurricane affecting us is becoming more likely  than but once every century or so.

Except they do affect us more than once a century...

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  • dendrite unpinned this topic
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/22/2021 at 4:17 PM, HIPPYVALLEY said:

We literally have no posters in far W MA

@GCWarrioris the closest but he is barely in the E Slope.  After him I am the next furthest west.   I guess nobody lives out here.  :(

I was in the North Cascades during Henri.  I was relieved to hear it wasn’t so bad at home. 

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