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August 9-12, 2021 Severe Threats


Chicago Storm
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I'll climb a damn tree if I have to. I don't care anymore. I just need to do something to break the boringness. Yes I know it's not that simple, but at this point even seeing what the Northwoods are like would be a treat compared to sitting on my cheeks at home. 

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2 hours ago, Malacka11 said:

I'll climb a damn tree if I have to. I don't care anymore. I just need to do something to break the boringness. Yes I know it's not that simple, but at this point even seeing what the Northwoods are like would be a treat compared to sitting on my cheeks at home. 

You haven't been to the Northwoods yet and you live in Wisconsin? 

Easy to describe, it's nicer than where you live. Simply put. 

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12 minutes ago, Jonger said:

You haven't been to the Northwoods yet and you live in Wisconsin? 

Easy to describe, it's nicer than where you live. Simply put. 

I don't live in Wisconsin, I live in Chicagoland. The last real forest I've laid eyes upon was in Germany over half a decade ago. Hence why I'd be willing to drive half a day just to see some new terrain.

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1 hour ago, andyhb said:
Well the 18z HRRR would be a bad scenario for just about all of Chicagoland.
Also Boscobel WI tornado from yesterday rated EF3, 150 mph winds.


3km NAM is also quite interesting.

The disturbance in question for tomorrow has a tor warned sup along the IA/MN border currently.


.

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1 hour ago, Chicago Storm said:


3km NAM is also quite interesting.

The disturbance in question for tomorrow has a tor warned sup along the IA/MN border currently.


.

Literal Rochelle 2.0, lol. Unless I'm missing something, the UDH on the HRRR isn't really that alarming. It was showing phat red/purple streaks in Iowa on 7/14 for example, or even for yesterday's Boscobel tornado although it placed that simulated sup too far NE at least on the run I saw. However, I've noticed you can't really key in on that particular product until the day of, especially with these mesoscale-driven summer events.

Then further out, 3KM NAM's scenario for Tuesday does not exactly jive well with SPC's Day 3 outlook.

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Aurora received the greatest 24-hour rainfall (16.94 inches) in Illinois history, exceeding the previous record of 16.54 inches at East St. Louis on June 14, 1957. A broad band of 8-inch-plus rainfall from just south of Rockford to a little north of Kankakee exceeded the 7.58 inch threshold regarded as the average 100-year (once every 100 years) 24-hour storm for a given point in northeast Illinois. The deluge in Aurora was considered a 1-in-1,000-year event. The Joliet Brandon Dam measured 13.60 inches, and a gauge in the extreme southwest corner of the Chicago metro area recorded 10.99 inches. Strong thunderstorms hit on the afternoon of the 17th, but the greatest rainfall in most areas occurred in early morning thunderstorms on the 18th.

Wow. Never knew that was a thing. Shared assuming there's at least one other ignoramus like me in here

 

 

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Malacka11 said:

Aurora received the greatest 24-hour rainfall (16.94 inches) in Illinois history, exceeding the previous record of 16.54 inches at East St. Louis on June 14, 1957. A broad band of 8-inch-plus rainfall from just south of Rockford to a little north of Kankakee exceeded the 7.58 inch threshold regarded as the average 100-year (once every 100 years) 24-hour storm for a given point in northeast Illinois. The deluge in Aurora was considered a 1-in-1,000-year event. The Joliet Brandon Dam measured 13.60 inches, and a gauge in the extreme southwest corner of the Chicago metro area recorded 10.99 inches. Strong thunderstorms hit on the afternoon of the 17th, but the greatest rainfall in most areas occurred in early morning thunderstorms on the 18th.

Wow. Never knew that was a thing. Shared assuming there's at least one other ignoramus like me in here

 

 

 

 

 

u aren't from here, understandable 

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19 minutes ago, Malacka11 said:

Aurora received the greatest 24-hour rainfall (16.94 inches) in Illinois history, exceeding the previous record of 16.54 inches at East St. Louis on June 14, 1957. A broad band of 8-inch-plus rainfall from just south of Rockford to a little north of Kankakee exceeded the 7.58 inch threshold regarded as the average 100-year (once every 100 years) 24-hour storm for a given point in northeast Illinois. The deluge in Aurora was considered a 1-in-1,000-year event. The Joliet Brandon Dam measured 13.60 inches, and a gauge in the extreme southwest corner of the Chicago metro area recorded 10.99 inches. Strong thunderstorms hit on the afternoon of the 17th, but the greatest rainfall in most areas occurred in early morning thunderstorms on the 18th.

Wow. Never knew that was a thing. Shared assuming there's at least one other ignoramus like me in here

 

 

 

 

 

That happened when I was in high school. Although I lived 30 miles away from Aurora, we still got 12"+. I lived in our finished basement and heard a gurgling noise coming out of the floor drain, followed by raw sewage exploding out of the drain (and bathroom toilet lol). All said, there was about 4' of raw sewage in our basement as a result of the storm. In June that year, we got about 1-2' of rain water in the basement. We had just replaced the carpeting and had the drywall replaced.

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47 minutes ago, Malacka11 said:

Aurora received the greatest 24-hour rainfall (16.94 inches) in Illinois history, exceeding the previous record of 16.54 inches at East St. Louis on June 14, 1957. A broad band of 8-inch-plus rainfall from just south of Rockford to a little north of Kankakee exceeded the 7.58 inch threshold regarded as the average 100-year (once every 100 years) 24-hour storm for a given point in northeast Illinois. The deluge in Aurora was considered a 1-in-1,000-year event. The Joliet Brandon Dam measured 13.60 inches, and a gauge in the extreme southwest corner of the Chicago metro area recorded 10.99 inches. Strong thunderstorms hit on the afternoon of the 17th, but the greatest rainfall in most areas occurred in early morning thunderstorms on the 18th.

Wow. Never knew that was a thing. Shared assuming there's at least one other ignoramus like me in here

 

 

 

 

 

Man, I moved here almost 2 years ago and thus have never heard of it.  I went through the great flood nobody knows about, but even that "only" put down this much rain.  "In two days, a record of 13.67″ of rain fell in Nashville, nearly doubling the old two day total from the remnants of a hurricane in 1979."

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