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Memory Lane

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10 hours ago, Stormlover74 said:

We hadn't had a nor'Easter like that in at least a decade

March 2010 was amother big wind event but 1992 wind/coastal flooding goes unrivaled, re: a nor'easter around here.

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47 minutes ago, Stormlover74 said:

March 2010 was probably more intense

1992 wins that but barely.  The difference in regards to the wind when comparing 1992 and 2010 was the wind direction (SE in 2010 and NE in 1992)  and much shorter duration of the strongest winds in 2010.  

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5th grade. 2001. I remember that day as a normal day in class talking about the hurricane (Erin I think?) as I was a huge weather nerd. Suddenly the teachers announced the news that planes hijacked by terrorists have been crashed into both world trade centers. 

Honestly thought we were entering a war during that period. We had to leave schools early due to safety concerns and being near Washington D.C, as the elementary school I went to was only about 20-30 miles from there.

#NeverForget

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One specific storm I remember  from a young age was tropical storm Doria in 1971...I remember the flooding on the side of our house where my rain gage was...So I've been at this weather observing thing for a long time.

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one of my first weather memories was hearing the wind howling thru the alley way of my house...it was situated almost ne/sw so the ne wind had a funneling effect...it had to be from 1954 when I was five...

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Unc jogged my memory. August 1954, Hurricane Carol, I was seven. The wires on 75th Street, Bay Ridge Parkway were all above ground and on huge telephone poles. I remember, no power and being afraid. I had no concept of a hurricane being a natural event in nature. I’m afraid in my young mind I gave it metaphysical qualities and stayed very close to my mom as we sat in the dark. I remember the next day riding with my dad. He had a 1950 Buick Roadmaster, a chrome and steel tank. We rode long lengths of tenth and eleventh avenues. As I looked down the side street I saw fallen trees, crossed like swords. So many streets, it seemed to me. That strong impression always remained with me. It seemed like the east coast was a storm magnet at that time.                                        It wasn’t until  December of 1960 when my interest in the weather took hold. I was thirteen and a Freshman in Brooklyn Tech. The day  it hit I remember the sky milky white, with the sun a well camouflaged yolk. It was cold and people were starting to ramp up for the holidays. We didn’t start before Halloween at that time. If I remember correctly the storm started with intensity, in the late afternoon. By the morning, public school classes were cancelled, a miracle event at the time. Bless you Mayor Wagner. I never remember seeing that much snow. The temperature, l believe dropped to the single digits. 17.5 inches fell, based on the radio reports. To my young eyes and up to my lower calf slogging, it seemed a lot more. Maybe the CPK measurement team was in training at the time. Based on how the future turned out, they graduated with honors. Little did I know that it would be a winter to remember. A winter of natural and unnatural disasters. Sad memories of the USS Constellation fire and the Boeing 707 crash into Brooklyn, all in snow. Unc and other more competent forum members can check my data. I could have myself but why mess up a childhood memory with facts. As always ....

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19 minutes ago, rclab said:

Unc jogged my memory. August 1954, Hurricane Carol, I was seven. The wires on 75th Street, Bay Ridge Parkway were all above ground and on huge telephone poles. I remember, no power and being afraid. I had no concept of a hurricane being a natural event in nature. I’m afraid in my young mind I gave it metaphysical qualities and stayed very close to my mom as we sat in the dark. I remember the next day riding with my dad. He had a 1950 Buick Roadmaster, a chrome and steel tank. We rode long lengths of tenth and eleventh avenues. As I looked down the side street I saw fallen trees, crossed like swords. So many streets, it seemed to me. That strong impression always remained with me. It seemed like the east coast was a storm magnet at that time.                                        It wasn’t until  December of 1960 when my interest in the weather took hold. I was thirteen and a Freshman in Brooklyn Tech. The day  it hit I remember the sky milky white, with the sun a well camouflaged yolk. It was cold and people were starting to ramp up for the holidays. We didn’t start before Halloween at that time. If I remember correctly the storm started with intensity, in the late afternoon. By the morning, public school classes were cancelled, a miracle event at the time. Bless you Mayor Wagner. I never remember seeing that much snow. The temperature, l believe dropped to the single digits. 17.5 inches fell, based on the radio reports. To my young eyes and up to my lower calf slogging, it seemed a lot more. Maybe the CPK measurement team was in training at the time. Based on how the future turned out, they graduated with honors. Little did I know that it would be a winter to remember. A winter of natural and unnatural disasters. Sad memories of the USS Constellation fire and the Boeing 707 crash into Brooklyn, all in snow. Unc and other more competent forum members can check my data. I could have myself but why mess up a childhood memory with facts. As always ....

the December 11-12th 1960 storm is still one of my favorites...16.6" in Bensonhurst...21" at Newark...15.2" in Central Park...record cold followed...then the two disasters spoiled it...it was great to be 11 years old during March 1960 to Feb. 1961 ...four cold windy snowstorms and hurricane Donna...

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I remember when I was 4 we had what was left of hurricane David in 1979. I'm not sure I knew what a hurricane was or why we would name them but I could see the rain blowing down the street sideways and the man on the radio saying to stay away from the windows

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4 hours ago, uncle W said:

the December 11-12th 1960 storm is still one of my favorites...16.6" in Bensonhurst...21" at Newark...15.2" in Central Park...record cold followed...then the two disasters spoiled it...it was great to be 11 years old during March 1960 to Feb. 1961 ...four cold windy snowstorms and hurricane Donna...

I can never forget the raging river that was really the stairs going up to Fort Green Park during Donna. Schools were not closed for that one. I remember seeing the widest and beautiful rainbow in my Dyker Heights sky. The day the March snow storm started I was riding the Sea Beach express back from a school chums house, in Coney Island. I remember my father, that night, settling the old, yes he still had it, 50 Buick in the big alley community drive. The winds were strong with drifts already growing. Bay Ridge Parkway was a snow emergency street and the Old Man was in no mood to get towed again. Moving vehicles were banned from the streets during the emergency. A reminder of the disasters brings them right back to me. John Tillman on my black and white TV reporting, on site, the Constellation fire. The young boy Boeing 707 passenger, who only survived a couple of Days. The heartbreaking photos in the news and mirror. The fellow selling Christmas trees at the crash impact site, I believe his remains were never found. Perhaps I’m wrong but it sorta stuck with me. A dramatic fall and winter series of events, some great , some far from it and never forgotten . As always ...

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1 hour ago, rclab said:

I can never forget the raging river that was really the stairs going up to Fort Green Park during Donna. Schools were not closed for that one. I remember seeing the widest and beautiful rainbow in my Dyker Heights sky. The day the March snow storm started I was riding the Sea Beach express back from a school chums house, in Coney Island. I remember my father, that night, settling the old, yes he still had it, 50 Buick in the big alley community drive. The winds were strong with drifts already growing. Bay Ridge Parkway was a snow emergency street and the Old Man was in no mood to get towed again. Moving vehicles were banned from the streets during the emergency. A reminder of the disasters brings them right back to me. John Tillman on my black and white TV reporting, on site, the Constellation fire. The young boy Boeing 707 passenger, who only survived a couple of Days. The heartbreaking photos in the news and mirror. The fellow selling Christmas trees at the crash impact site, I believe his remains were never found. Perhaps I’m wrong but it sorta stuck with me. A dramatic fall and winter series of events, some great , some far from it and never forgotten . As always ...

the morning of the March 3rd 1960 storm had a forecast for snow changing to rain on the morning TV news...I was walking on 11th Ave and 63rd St at about 8am with light snow falling...it was 27 degrees and snow was starting to drift near the curb...I said to myself how could this snow change to rain...it could have easy if a coastal that developed near Virginia and bombed out didn't...the weather bureau missed that one...That evening while listing to WMGM on the radio the disc jockey ( Scott Muni ) said 'hey kids...no school tomorrow'...

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30 minutes ago, uncle W said:

the morning of the March 3rd 1960 storm had a forecast for snow changing to rain on the morning TV news...I was walking on 11th Ave and 63rd St at about 8am with light snow falling...it was 27 degrees and snow was starting to drift near the curb...I said to myself how could this snow change to rain...it could have easy if a coastal that developed near Virginia and bombed out didn't...the weather bureau missed that one...That evening while listing to WMGM on the radio the disc jockey ( Scott Muni ) said 'hey kids...no school tomorrow'...

Your memory is sharper, Unc. I do remember Scott Muni. I also remember listening, a year or two later to HOA, Herb Oscar Anderson. He had a fine morning radio broadcast. The biggest change to rain blunder I remember was a 78 Jan or Feb storm. I was a letter carrier in Brooklyn Heights and delivered two routs that day. The motto was taken seriously. It was supposed to change to rain quickly. 13.5 inches later it finally changed to freezing drizzle. As always .....

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3 hours ago, rclab said:

Your memory is sharper, Unc. I do remember Scott Muni. I also remember listening, a year or two later to HOA, Herb Oscar Anderson. He had a fine morning radio broadcast. The biggest change to rain blunder I remember was a 78 Jan or Feb storm. I was a letter carrier in Brooklyn Heights and delivered two routs that day. The motto was taken seriously. It was supposed to change to rain quickly. 13.5 inches later it finally changed to freezing drizzle. As always .....

that was Jan 19-20th, 1978...only Alan kasper was worried we would get a big hit on his late night show...from Jan. 9th-Feb 7th 1978 there were six major storms that brought rain or snow or both...that was a bad month for letter carriers...

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13 hours ago, uncle W said:

that was Jan 19-20th, 1978...only Alan kasper was worried we would get a big hit on his late night show...from Jan. 9th-Feb 7th 1978 there were six major storms that brought rain or snow or both...that was a bad month for letter carriers...

Thank you, Unc. I liked Mr. Casper and his style of delivery. My ‘thank you’ for delivering two routes, without even being a regular, was .... I only had to deliver one route the next day. 41 years does make a difference. As always .....

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