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March 6th-8th Ocean Storm Obs


free_man

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The subsidence was one thing... but was made worse by the fact that Tolland did well and the trolls on the hills equated it to "they always downslope in the valley... no surprise" 

 

 

This setup was def more prone to downslope in the valley than normal....though usually HFD doesn't downslope nearly as bad as up in the CT River Valley in MA to the north. The S ORH and Tolland hills are smaller than the N ORH hills and Monads.

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This setup was def more prone to downslope in the valley than normal....though usually HFD doesn't downslope nearly as bad as up in the CT River Valley in MA to the north. The S ORH and Tolland hills are smaller than the N ORH hills and Monads.

 

Even places like South Glastonbury CT managed 20" out of that one. It was really bizarre. They're defnitely a "valley' location.  

 

And yeah... I think a storm like that could argue for a 10-20 percent reduction for downsloping in the valley but the biggest reason we got screwed wasn't downsloping much mesoscale susidence. Looked like a pretty impressive standing wave pattern in the boundary layer from the fire hose. 

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Even places like South Glastonbury CT managed 20" out of that one. It was really bizarre. They're defnitely a "valley' location.  

 

And yeah... I think a storm like that could argue for a 10-20 percent reduction for downsloping in the valley but the biggest reason we got screwed wasn't downsloping much mesoscale susidence. Looked like a pretty impressive standing wave pattern in the boundary layer from the fire hose. 

 

 

Oh yeah, downslopng def cannot explain that large of a discrepency...not unless its like Dec '92 with 60 knot BL winds out of the east, lol. This certianly wasn't that.

 

What happened in RI shows there were some mesoscale things going on with subsidence since they don't have any downslope.

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best pics you have ever taken,beats any fake snow pile in a driveway

That was one of my all time favorites. I took that early that morning and if i recall there was already about  a foot. It kept snowing all day and we ended up with 22.5..was watching that dryslot to the east..just thankfully we had the upslope to keep it at bay

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That was one of my all time favorites. I took that early that morning and if i recall there was already about 1 afoot. It kept snowing all day and we ended up with 22.5..was watching that dryslot to the east..just thankfully we had the upslope to keep it at bay

Was not upslope. It was a mesoscale feature.

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Was not upslope. It was a mesoscale feature.

I don't agree. As soon as that flow hit the hills and out of the valley in RI it started snowing..and what happened in Glastonbury was a function of the winds actually carrying the moisture they wrung out from the hills in that direction and dropping the snow. The Valley def was downsloped severely..that's not trolling..it's fact All you have to do is watch the radar loop to see what happened as the flow hit the hills

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I don't agree. As soon as that flow hit the hills and out of the valley in RI it started snowing..and what happened in Glastonbury was a function of the winds actually carrying the moisture they wrung out from the hills in that direction and dropping the snow. The Valley def was downsloped severely..that's not trolling..it's fact All you have to do is watch the radar loop to see what happened as the flow hit the hills

Disagree about Tolland. Most of that was a mesoscale feature. Some upslope contributed, but that explain a small amount. You don't upslope on a NE wind as we've all noted and that bullseye was over you.

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Disagree about Tolland. Most of that was a mesoscale feature. Some upslope contributed, but that explain a small amount. You don't upslope on a NE wind as we've all noted and that bullseye was over you.

Yeah I like Ryan's percentage of like up to 20% contributed to terrain...maybe would've been the difference between 15-18" and 21-24".

It's like up here if banding sets up over the mountains, the bulk of the lift is occurring higher up in the frontogenesis, but there may be a slight low level enhancement almost like seeder feeder. Areas outside that band aren't getting downsloped, they just don't have the forcing overhead.

IIRC, the lift in that March storm wasn't all happening in the low levels.

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I don't agree. As soon as that flow hit the hills and out of the valley in RI it started snowing..and what happened in Glastonbury was a function of the winds actually carrying the moisture they wrung out from the hills in that direction and dropping the snow. The Valley def was downsloped severely..that's not trolling..it's fact All you have to do is watch the radar loop to see what happened as the flow hit the hills

 

 

You hardly got any upslope there, if any at all....I disagree. I've been watching interior SNE upslope for years and you are not in the right area on most of these types of systems...you need like a SE flow for upslope...not an ENE or NE flow...that actually downslopes you slighty...esp NE flow. ENE is a bit more neutral.

 

 

 

A lot of the valley screwjob was the standing wave pattern...same feature that screwed RI...and you can't blame downslope on the RI screwjie. The bigger upslope contributors are well to your northeast in N ORH county and to the NW in the Berks.

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You hardly got any upslope there, if any at all....I disagree. I've been watching interior SNE upslope for years and you are not in the right area on most of these types of systems...you need like a SE flow for upslope...not an ENE or NE flow...that actually downslopes you slighty...esp NE flow. ENE is a bit more neutral.

A lot of the valley screwjob was the standing wave pattern...same feature that screwed RI...and you can't blame downslope on the RI screwjie. The bigger upslope contributors are well to your northeast in N ORH county and to the NW in the Berks.

never saw any research on this event figured someone would have. I thought of it like when you see gravity wave clouds.My obs that night of hearing great gusts of winds far in the distance then getting hit then calm immediately followed by intense snow to dry slot while radar exploded over NE Ct led me to believe we were in fact dealing with a process similar to GW processes. Hence the heavy qpf on the Cape,dry slot RI,heavy CCt,dry slot valley to more in WCT
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never saw any research on this event figured someone would have. I thought of it like when you see gravity wave clouds.My obs that night of hearing great gusts of winds far in the distance then getting hit then calm immediately followed by intense snow to dry slot while radar exploded over NE Ct led me to believe we were in fact dealing with a process similar to GW processes. Hence the heavy qpf on the Cape,dry slot RI,heavy CCt,dry slot valley to more in WCT

I think it was a standing wave type deal as well. Even the RAP had it as Ekster posted an image of it. I also think the s/w in NY state helped enhance the snow a bit over CT. It's possible there may have been a fluky interaction that helped create the RI subsidence and since the s/w's sort of dumbelled around each other....it may have helped to lock that feature in place.

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I think it was a standing wave type deal as well. Even the RAP had it as Ekster posted an image of it. I also think the s/w in NY state helped enhance the snow a bit over CT. It's possible there may have been a fluky interaction that helped create the RI subsidence and since the s/w's sort of dumbelled around each other....it may have helped to lock that feature in place.

yes,certainly the most interesting mesoscale large scale snow storm I can remember. Kudos to this subgroup in this one,excellent discussions before and after.
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yes,certainly the most interesting mesoscale large scale snow storm I can remember. Kudos to this subgroup in this one,excellent discussions before and after.

 

 

Lots of mesoscale processes at play in this one...including upslope, though we cannot blame the terrain solely for the screwzone in the valley. But I did drive around after this event and there was a noticeable dropoff in snow on the west side of the ORH hills. The deep layer easterly flow really wrings out the moisture on the east side. Combined with where th ebest synoptic firehose of moisture was aimed, there was a noticeable jackpot zone from like Princeton down to Holden, Paxton, Sterling, West Boylston and ORH...a little less further north but the discrepency between east and west was still evident there...like going from 18" on the west side of FIT to around 8-10" in the Royalston, Phillipston, Athol region.

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great event , cant remember exactly what I measured but the PNS has 21" for mby (shrewsbury). the models were all over the place prior to the event and due to the anomalous set-up most were cautious to forecast large amounts (12"+ IIRC). very cool to experience 'dec 1992 light' since I was too young to experience that event

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