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At Least The 12th Lawn Thread


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1 hour ago, backedgeapproaching said:

Nice, lawn and landscape beds looking good.  Some of those mature trees can help with some shade too to keep soil temps down and and retain some moisture.

 

1 hour ago, dendrite said:

Looks great, but save some of the rain for me. Just the right amount of large, mature trees mixed in as well. A+

Thanks. Yeah a chunk of the yard is shaded, but i have a lot of ledge. So where it’s sunny it torches too.

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24 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

For back edge, I turned our rock outcropping into a bed several years ago. Slowly adding some more plants. 
Ended up doing a strip by our fence to jazz it up.

 

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Love it, nice use of the natural landscape, people would pay good money to have some hardscape rocks like that put into their landscape. Personally, larger rocks/boulders/ledge combined into garden beds with perennials or evergreens is one of my favorite looks. 

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10 hours ago, dendrite said:

Interesting article, though I had to laugh at "remote coastal town", which conjures up toothpick-chewing retired lobstermen on weather-beaten porches.  Cape Elizabeth is about 5 miles south of PWM and if not the richest per-capita community in Maine, it's certainly in the running.  I'd also dispute (mildly) a couple of other statements.  Though I've seen chestnut's awesome sprout power on the state lot in Topsham, "more sustainable than other hardwoods" is overly broad.  Many thousands of oak-dominant forest in SNE and the MA were coppice-managed for firewood over many decades.  Also, placing the north extent of chestnuts at the midcoast ignores the natural origin trees on a state lot about 25 miles north of his publisher's office in BGR.
On the other hand, it's exciting that there's a two-pronged effort for restoration of the species, multiple hybrid crosses and this gene-spliced version.  I hope both can be a part of bringing back this great tree to American forests.

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14 hours ago, backedgeapproaching said:

Love it, nice use of the natural landscape, people would pay good money to have some hardscape rocks like that put into their landscape. Personally, larger rocks/boulders/ledge combined into garden beds with perennials or evergreens is one of my favorite looks. 

When I put my lawn in I dug up some big boulders and used them in the landscape, they look good and the less distance I had to move them the better because they're frigging heavy.

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Nice looking beds, for sure!  And I agree on the rock.  We had at least 100' of stone wall in front of our place that was built extremely poorly by the previous owner and it all collapsed, so I've been taking it apart and moving it by hand.  This was after I spent at least 30-40 hours rebuilding a section correctly that the wife later decided she no longer wanted.  But now I have a LOT of nice stones to use for mini walls and beds.

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1 hour ago, QCD17 said:

Nice looking beds, for sure!  And I agree on the rock.  We had at least 100' of stone wall in front of our place that was built extremely poorly by the previous owner and it all collapsed, so I've been taking it apart and moving it by hand.  This was after I spent at least 30-40 hours rebuilding a section correctly that the wife later decided she no longer wanted.  But now I have a LOT of nice stones to use for mini walls and beds.

I have a 350 foot stone wall that was partially in disarray when we bought the land. I've slowly rebuilt it over the years even though I was told it was illegal since it's a boundary wall, no one complained and it looks good.

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2 hours ago, DavisStraight said:

When I put my lawn in I dug up some big boulders and used them in the landscape, they look good and the less distance I had to move them the better because they're frigging heavy.

Nice, one of my neighbors is doing some serious excavation right now for some type of addition and they have piles and piles of rocks and boulders. Not sure what their plan is, but going to ask them if they can drop a few in my yard..:)

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14 minutes ago, backedgeapproaching said:

New England has some amazing stone walls, love those too.  I built a couple hundred feet of stone walls all from rocks hand picked from my woods-that was alot of work..lol

Just think the settlers built all those walls as they dug up the field for crops and the stone walls were fencing, talk about a lot of work. My current house is on what was a large cow farm years ago, stone walls are still there but the farm got chopped up into house lots we all have 1-2+ acres so we're spread out.

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We have about 10 acres, the majority of which is woods, and the stone walls go all the way from the road to the back of the woods and beyond.  It's gotta be upwards of a mile worth of wall just on our land alone.  They basically go on for thousands of acres beyond our land.   It makes me stop and think when I come across a stone wall deep in the woods somewhere while hiking and I realize that there was farmland there a few hundred years ago.  I still don't understand how they built all of them.  There are rocks that are 6' across in some parts of our walls.  The original walls are at least 6' wide at the base and 4' high.

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2 hours ago, QCD17 said:

We have about 10 acres, the majority of which is woods, and the stone walls go all the way from the road to the back of the woods and beyond.  It's gotta be upwards of a mile worth of wall just on our land alone.  They basically go on for thousands of acres beyond our land.   It makes me stop and think when I come across a stone wall deep in the woods somewhere while hiking and I realize that there was farmland there a few hundred years ago.  I still don't understand how they built all of them.  There are rocks that are 6' across in some parts of our walls.  The original walls are at least 6' wide at the base and 4' high.

Oxen pulled the stones, leverage put them.in. Amazing ingenuity

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2 hours ago, QCD17 said:

We have about 10 acres, the majority of which is woods, and the stone walls go all the way from the road to the back of the woods and beyond.  It's gotta be upwards of a mile worth of wall just on our land alone.  They basically go on for thousands of acres beyond our land.   It makes me stop and think when I come across a stone wall deep in the woods somewhere while hiking and I realize that there was farmland there a few hundred years ago.  I still don't understand how they built all of them.  There are rocks that are 6' across in some parts of our walls.  The original walls are at least 6' wide at the base and 4' high.

Horses (and oxen - thanks, Ginxy), stone boats, sweat and time - still amazes me.  Our 80 acres has the road for one line with about 3/4 of the back and far side lines on stone walls and some tree-embedded wire on other lines - no interior stone walls.  The open field across the road and the much larger fields 100 yards or so beyond that back wall probably were plowed/cropped in the distant past but are hayfields today.  I don't think our lot has ever felt a plow - most is too wet, much has above-ground boulders, but the wire fence points to our acres having been grazed.  There's some older cedar and a smattering of 100 ft+ pine but 95% of the trees are <100 years old

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On 6/13/2021 at 7:46 PM, CoastalWx said:

For back edge, I turned our rock outcropping into a bed several years ago. Slowly adding some more plants. 
Ended up doing a strip by our fence to jazz it up.

 

01F9596A-387D-466A-B56A-3B26AE43F47E.jpeg

AF8D5620-B515-4964-81E5-714EA8E3158F.jpeg

Awesome, I had to import my rocks , love what youve done beats buried cardboard and .... whatever

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1 minute ago, S&P said:

Awesome, I had to import my rocks , love what youve done beats buried cardboard and .... whatever

Yeah I just got some loam and turned the dips and cavities into areas to plant. It was mostly grass before, but nothing grew where it was rocky. 

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On 6/13/2021 at 7:46 PM, CoastalWx said:

For back edge, I turned our rock outcropping into a bed several years ago. Slowly adding some more plants. 
Ended up doing a strip by our fence to jazz it up.

 

01F9596A-387D-466A-B56A-3B26AE43F47E.jpeg

AF8D5620-B515-4964-81E5-714EA8E3158F.jpeg

No red mulch in Weymo?  They're going to revoke your membership.  :D

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14 hours ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

Red mulch is gross. When we moved in 3yrs ago it was everywhere with ugly bushes and the first project was to yank the ugly bushes out and remove the red mulch. Of course I’m still not done finishing the entire project around the back deck and we are moving, again. 

Damn… staying in New England?

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Vegetable and plant gardens are coming along. Have 3 vegetable gardens this is one along with the natural plant garden. Lots of green beans this year. The dogs love them. Have tomatoes, cauliflower, broccoli, hot and sweet peppers, cabbage, spaghetti and summer squash, cukes, oregano, basil, mint.

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