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Upstate/Eastern New York-Springtime?


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1 hour ago, cny rider said:

Same amount here.

I feel like this summer is just right.  We are getting enough rain for everything to grow and flourish but still having many beautiful summer days.

The wild raspberry crop is the best we have ever had:

 

I agree with that.  But I've heard from a couple farmers that some springs for the cattle have dried up.  I assume they are not the best springs around, but it is making it hard to get water to some livestock.

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7 hours ago, BuffaloWeather said:

The heat wave out in UK is quite worrisome. UK hit 40+ for the first time in its recording history. 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2022/07/19/europe-heatwave-uk-temperature-record-broken/10094289002/

The heat all over the world is getting pretty alarming but I can think of few places on this whole earth better suited for extreme warming than WNY.  We have more water than we even know what to do with as Lake Ontario has flooded several times over the last 5 years and the great lakes are basically an endless source of fresh water (not to mention the fingerlakes).  We have ample room during summers for it to get quite a bit warmer with no real issues other than hearing Tughill Matt complain ;) and our winters could certainly get much warmer without any true tangible consequences aside from pissing most of us off and maybe allowing some insects to survive the winter which could be a nuisance for some trees/plants.  There are few places on this planet I'd rather be than right here if runaway global warming continues at the current rate.  We are well insulated (no pun intended) from the deadly affects.  I foresee our real estate becoming a commodity in the next 10-20 years.  Sit tight friends!

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1 minute ago, DeltaT13 said:

The heat all over the world is getting pretty alarming but I can think of few places on this whole earth better suited for extreme warming than WNY.  We have more water than we even know what to do with as Lake Ontario has flooded several times over the last 5 years and the great lakes are basically an endless source of fresh water (not to mention the fingerlakes).  We have ample room during summers for it to get quite a bit warmer with no real issues other than hearing Tughill Matt complain ;) and our winters could certainly get much warmer without any true tangible consequences aside from pissing most of us off and maybe allowing some insects to survive the winter which could be a nuisance for some trees/plants.  There are few places on this planet I'd rather be than right here if runaway global warming continues at the current rate.  We are well insulated (no pun intended) from the deadly affects.  I foresee our real estate becoming a commodity in the next 10-20 years.  Sit tight friends!

This is great advice. I'll likely be moving in the next few years and renting out my current place. I want to get 3-4 rental units going at once, hopefully a multifamily as well. 

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7 hours ago, DeltaT13 said:

The heat all over the world is getting pretty alarming but I can think of few places on this whole earth better suited for extreme warming than WNY.  We have more water than we even know what to do with as Lake Ontario has flooded several times over the last 5 years and the great lakes are basically an endless source of fresh water (not to mention the fingerlakes).  We have ample room during summers for it to get quite a bit warmer with no real issues other than hearing Tughill Matt complain ;) and our winters could certainly get much warmer without any true tangible consequences aside from pissing most of us off and maybe allowing some insects to survive the winter which could be a nuisance for some trees/plants.  There are few places on this planet I'd rather be than right here if runaway global warming continues at the current rate.  We are well insulated (no pun intended) from the deadly affects.  I foresee our real estate becoming a commodity in the next 10-20 years.  Sit tight friends!

Agreed, although I think it may be worse than you think. Given what we've been seeing, which is often worse than what the models show, and factoring in the model projections for the year 2100, looks like there will be a permanent dust bowl over the central and southern Plains. That is to say, conditions akin to those present during the Dust Bowl will just be considered the base climate state as opposed to some extreme deviation from the norm. While the Great Lakes are projected to see precipitation increases, the summer projections show a modest decrease in precipitation - but more importantly, a large increase in the number of consecutive dry days and the number of days with extreme heat (90s, 100s) with the precipitation falling increasingly in occasional torrents - perhaps from tropical disturbances, or slow-moving gullywashers from time to time when the heat breaks. Makes sense with the Hadley cells moving north and expanding - should put much of the CONUS firmly in a region of predominantly sinking air. I imagine agricultural interests will find such conditions quite challenging. Will probably require substantially more irrigation.

I just get worried when I see widespread temperatures of 115-118F in the Pacific Northwest, and 100-104F in the UK (north of 50N), which are both heavily marine-influenced climates, but relatively dry in the summertime. What happens when this projected drying expands east into the Plains. There were temperatures up to 120F in the Dust Bowl all the way into the northern Plains. What happens in 2100, with CO2 at 500+, maybe substantially higher, in an already drying climate when a mega drought shows up - do we see temperatures of 130F, 140F, shattering world records? Will it just get so hot that crops simply desiccate and die in the extreme heat, such that no amount of irrigation will be sufficient?

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11 hours ago, TheClimateChanger said:

Agreed, although I think it may be worse than you think. Given what we've been seeing, which is often worse than what the models show, and factoring in the model projections for the year 2100, looks like there will be a permanent dust bowl over the central and southern Plains. That is to say, conditions akin to those present during the Dust Bowl will just be considered the base climate state as opposed to some extreme deviation from the norm. While the Great Lakes are projected to see precipitation increases, the summer projections show a modest decrease in precipitation - but more importantly, a large increase in the number of consecutive dry days and the number of days with extreme heat (90s, 100s) with the precipitation falling increasingly in occasional torrents - perhaps from tropical disturbances, or slow-moving gullywashers from time to time when the heat breaks. Makes sense with the Hadley cells moving north and expanding - should put much of the CONUS firmly in a region of predominantly sinking air. I imagine agricultural interests will find such conditions quite challenging. Will probably require substantially more irrigation.

I just get worried when I see widespread temperatures of 115-118F in the Pacific Northwest, and 100-104F in the UK (north of 50N), which are both heavily marine-influenced climates, but relatively dry in the summertime. What happens when this projected drying expands east into the Plains. There were temperatures up to 120F in the Dust Bowl all the way into the northern Plains. What happens in 2100, with CO2 at 500+, maybe substantially higher, in an already drying climate when a mega drought shows up - do we see temperatures of 130F, 140F, shattering world records? Will it just get so hot that crops simply desiccate and die in the extreme heat, such that no amount of irrigation will be sufficient?

These are all relevant concerns and I do see dark times ahead for a lot of the globe.  I don't think we will skate through this without any ramifications here in WNY, but I just think our area is extremely well positioned to to ride this out in the next few decades with little tangible damage in our own backyards at least.  That doesn't mean we won't feel the reverberations of large scale global concerns, but at least we shouldn't be feeling massive water restrictions (or likely any restrictions) or rolling blackouts, etc.  

Your other concerns about agriculture are much more interesting and potentially unfounded.  The way I've seen technology advance in just the last 20 years is nearly mind boggling.  I have to assume that we will find ways to basically produce food on a synthetic/chemical level by the year 2100.  All proteins, carbs, etc will likely be lab produced and far superior to anything we currently have. Raising livestock will eventually be completely unnecessary.  I know it sounds kooky, but think replicator type stuff from star trek.  And I'm sure we will have mastered indoor gardening on a scale that is unimaginable.  I'm thinking massive skyscrapers or entire cities producing food on scales that would dwarf what we do now, all climate controlled and extremely efficient in regards to water use.  There is also the possibility of a massive breakthrough in energy production that would then allow us to build massive carbon collection plants and desalinization plants.  I think the next 20-30 years will be the hardest but I'm very hopeful that technology will help us fight our way out of this climate predicament in enough time.   Let's just hope we don't have something far outside of our control like a massive kill shot from our sun that wipes us out... 

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All I know is I was backpacking in the Adirondacks this past weekend and it was too cold to sleep at night with my sub 30 degree sleeping bag. The low had to be right around freezing at the elevation I was at.  If **** hits the fan, I'm moving to those mountains. They are protected from alot of the heat and humidity. 

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27 minutes ago, tim123 said:

This climate change talk is laughable. Its summer it gets hot at times nothing new. Cycles come and go. Winter time it gets cold nothing new. All of this is artificial hysteria to push a depopulation agenda. 

This sort of loose talk would get you banned from OT. Or at the very least called a [email protected] by the intelligentsia there...such as it is.  ;)

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15 hours ago, TheClimateChanger said:

Agreed, although I think it may be worse than you think. Given what we've been seeing, which is often worse than what the models show, and factoring in the model projections for the year 2100, looks like there will be a permanent dust bowl over the central and southern Plains. That is to say, conditions akin to those present during the Dust Bowl will just be considered the base climate state as opposed to some extreme deviation from the norm. While the Great Lakes are projected to see precipitation increases, the summer projections show a modest decrease in precipitation - but more importantly, a large increase in the number of consecutive dry days and the number of days with extreme heat (90s, 100s) with the precipitation falling increasingly in occasional torrents - perhaps from tropical disturbances, or slow-moving gullywashers from time to time when the heat breaks. Makes sense with the Hadley cells moving north and expanding - should put much of the CONUS firmly in a region of predominantly sinking air. I imagine agricultural interests will find such conditions quite challenging. Will probably require substantially more irrigation.

I just get worried when I see widespread temperatures of 115-118F in the Pacific Northwest, and 100-104F in the UK (north of 50N), which are both heavily marine-influenced climates, but relatively dry in the summertime. What happens when this projected drying expands east into the Plains. There were temperatures up to 120F in the Dust Bowl all the way into the northern Plains. What happens in 2100, with CO2 at 500+, maybe substantially higher, in an already drying climate when a mega drought shows up - do we see temperatures of 130F, 140F, shattering world records? Will it just get so hot that crops simply desiccate and die in the extreme heat, such that no amount of irrigation will be sufficient?

;tldr :)

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4 hours ago, BuffaloWeather said:

All I know is I was backpacking in the Adirondacks this past weekend and it was too cold to sleep at night with my sub 30 degree sleeping bag. The low had to be right around freezing at the elevation I was at.  If **** hits the fan, I'm moving to those mountains. They are protected from alot of the heat and humidity. 

Yup, I think you will have a great time up thar.  Bring your banjo!  :lmao:

Screenshot_20220720-144117_Chrome.jpg

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22 hours ago, DeltaT13 said:

The heat all over the world is getting pretty alarming but I can think of few places on this whole earth better suited for extreme warming than WNY.  We have more water than we even know what to do with as Lake Ontario has flooded several times over the last 5 years and the great lakes are basically an endless source of fresh water (not to mention the fingerlakes).  We have ample room during summers for it to get quite a bit warmer with no real issues other than hearing Tughill Matt complain ;) and our winters could certainly get much warmer without any true tangible consequences aside from pissing most of us off and maybe allowing some insects to survive the winter which could be a nuisance for some trees/plants.  There are few places on this planet I'd rather be than right here if runaway global warming continues at the current rate.  We are well insulated (no pun intended) from the deadly affects.  I foresee our real estate becoming a commodity in the next 10-20 years.  Sit tight friends!

Here I am...minding my own business...not complaining or saying anything about the awful heat...but since you brought it up.... ;).... stupid Saharacuse does not have much room for it to get hotter. Consecutive summers of 20 something days hitting 90 or above.... snowpack having lots of trouble surviving the ridiculous winter warm spells... The average summer temps may max at 81-82 degrees, but they sure do seem to sit at 88 to 90 degrees here day after day. Temps err on the warm side of average by 5 to 10 degrees so very often. It's disgusting. 

You asked for it....................... :lmao:

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Just now, TugHillMatt said:

Here I am...minding my own business...not complaining or saying anything about the awful heat...but since you brought it up.... ;).... stupid Saharacuse does not have much room for it to get hotter. Consecutive summers of 20 something days hitting 90 or above.... snowpack having lots of trouble surviving the ridiculous winter warm spells... The average summer temps may max at 81-82 degrees, but they sure do seem to sit at 88 to 90 degrees here day after day. Temps err on the warm side of average by 5 to 10 degrees so very often. It's disgusting. 

You asked for it....................... :lmao:

My pool is at 85 degrees. So there's that...  ;)

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1 minute ago, TugHillMatt said:

Here I am...minding my own business...not complaining or saying anything about the awful heat...but since you brought it up.... ;).... stupid Saharacuse does not have much room for it to get hotter. Consecutive summers of 20 something days hitting 90 or above.... snowpack having lots of trouble surviving the ridiculous winter warm spells... The average summer temps may max at 81-82 degrees, but they sure do seem to sit at 88 to 90 degrees here day after day. Temps err on the warm side of average by 5 to 10 degrees so very often. It's disgusting. 

You asked for it....................... :lmao:

I've tagged you 20 times in discord with no response, come back to us. 

image.jpeg.5620a3aeb21aa99a81112c01e919f7f7.jpeg

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Just now, BuffaloWeather said:

I've tagged you 20 times in discord with no response, come back to us. 

LOL. I have been so freakin busy. I mean, I haven't had time to come on here and complain about the sizzle for...what like, 2 months? :P 

I have friends visiting from out of town starting tomorrow, so I don't know when I'll go on discord. I WANT to.. I just know I'm going to need at least a day to catch up on everything. Haha. I appreciate being missed. :) 

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6 minutes ago, BuffaloWeather said:

I've tagged you 20 times in discord with no response, come back to us. 

image.jpeg.5620a3aeb21aa99a81112c01e919f7f7.jpeg

The Discord is a merry band of Global Warmers. We dance sing ballads praising the God of Carbon! 

In fact, I may change my screen name to CarbonElectra! ;)

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38 minutes ago, TugHillMatt said:

LOL. I have been so freakin busy. I mean, I haven't had time to come on here and complain about the sizzle for...what like, 2 months? :P 

I have friends visiting from out of town starting tomorrow, so I don't know when I'll go on discord. I WANT to.. I just know I'm going to need at least a day to catch up on everything. Haha. I appreciate being missed. :) 

You're gonna need a week to catch up. Its been busy. 

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:ph34r:
 

Current conditions at

Rochester, Greater Rochester International Airport (KROC)

Lat: 43.12°NLon: 77.68°WElev: 558ft.
sct.png

Partly Cloudy

92°F

33°C

Humidity 41%
Wind Speed SW 15 G 25 mph
Barometer 29.67 in (1004.5 mb)
Dewpoint 65°F (18°C)
Visibility 10.00 mi
Heat Index 94°F (34°C)
Last update 20 Jul 2:54 pm EDT
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Current conditions at

Buffalo, Greater Buffalo International Airport (KBUF)

Lat: 42.94°NLon: 78.74°WElev: 709ft.
sct.png

Partly Cloudy

90°F

32°C

Humidity 44%
Wind Speed SW 15 G 24 mph
Barometer 29.63 in (1002.6 mb)
Dewpoint 65°F (18°C)
Visibility 10.00 mi
Heat Index 92°F (33°C)
Last update 20 Jul 3:54 pm EDT
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