• Member Statistics

    16,619
    Total Members
    7,904
    Most Online
    City Central
    Newest Member
    City Central
    Joined
Baroclinic Zone

Spring Banter

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

I see your point, but surely there must be a frequent overlap between crowding and overall population density. They would seem to go together in places such as the Bronx. That said, I understand the concept that something like household density and crowding may be more strongly correlated than overall city density. 

Yup-A place like the Bronx is both dense and crowded.

A good example of a place that is not particularly dense, but crowded, and suffered heavily from covid would be the Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, bch2014 said:

I'd argue that's not true... Especially the bigger quantities piece (but to your point about less healthy-the recent acquisitions by companies like PEP, MDLZ, etc would suggest they are making an effort to have a healthier portfolio).

I've worked for the US's largest snack manufacturer and now work for a large confectionary company, and contrary to popular belief, these companies aren't opposed to smaller package sizes as you can increase your net revenue/lb. If I can charge the same price for less product, I'm expanding my margins. Bet you didn't notice in 2019 that your bag of Family Size Doritos stayed $4.29 but the bags had a fraction of an ounce less product ;) .

Snack and confectionary companies definitely want everyone eating unhealthy foods because that is what they sell. They want people to pay the same for shrinking portions and end up buying more in the end to satisfy their cravings. 

  • Weenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

Snack and confectionary companies definitely want everyone eating unhealthy foods because that is what they sell. They want people to pay the same for shrinking portions and end up buying more in the end to satisfy their cravings. 

Sure-obviously we want people to buy our products. But I can honestly say that we focus more on household penetration (i.e. we want as many people as possible to buy the product a moderate amount) than per capita consumption (i.e. we want a static amount of people to buy our product more and more).

Focus on per capita consumption is more of a thing in shrinking categories (i.e. tobacco and bread).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, bch2014 said:

Sure-obviously we want people to buy our products. But I can honestly say that we focus more on household penetration (i.e. we want as many people as possible to buy the product a moderate amount) than per capita consumption (i.e. we want a static amount of people to buy our product more and more).

Focus on per capita consumption is more of a focus in shrinking categories (i.e. tobacco and bread).

LOL I see where this is headed. You guys want everyone very fat and addicted to snack food, but not so fat that any single customer eats too much and dies. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t get why sleeping in a bit is a sign of a bad employee.   I worked at a location other than home for 50 years.   The biggest pain was getting less sleep than I should in order to get showered and dressed and travel to work so I could be there on time.   If a remote worker can do the same things and have better work life balance why is that bad?   If I were paying rent or buying office space I’d push remote work for those where it doesn’t make a difference.   There are some face to face times but the overall benefit for the company and employee is high.  
 

Since I retired, I’ve had a part time remote gig (1 day/week).    I realize that the work can get done and indeed I own the schedule more so everyone is happy.    In fact, if anything I’m giving them more than their $$ worth.    But admittedly I have the luxury of saying no at any time.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

LOL I see where this is headed. You guys want everyone very fat and addicted to snack food, but not so fat that any single customer eats too much and dies. 

The US isn’t even in the top ten for confectionary consumption (lbs) per capita. The consumption medals go to Germany, Ireland, and Switzerland, all three of which have far lower obesity rates than the US.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Supernovice said:

I'm quite confident (+75%) that I will never return to a 5 day in office work week.  For all of the reasons listed above both on the employee and employer side + forecasts putting the unemployment rate in a range where employers will have to offer flexibility to remain competitive.  Which is where I'm at mentally- "oh you want me in 5 days a week regardless of what I have going on? Ok, I'll go work for someone else- Thanks!" I guess I'm fortunate to be in that position, but I would imagine many people are in a similar boat.

Below is my fave WFH anecdote from the dimmest Goldman CEO of our lifetimes:

Few things annoyed Solomon more last year than an encounter with a junior employee in the Hamptons. The Goldman Sachs boss has told lieutenants how the underling walked up at a restaurant, introduced himself and pointed to associates with him -- in the middle of a workday.

The tale has become the CEO’s go-to anecdote when he vents about his mostly-empty offices: proof that remote work has run amok.

Some who’ve heard the story note the apparent disconnect. The boss is perturbed by bumping into staff while he himself was spending extended summer weekends in the Hamptons at a luxe seaside rental. Solomon’s time there even made national news after he deejayed a concert where attendees flouted social-distancing guidelines, leaving New York state officials fuming

This will just become another differentiator that employers use to determine bonuses and advancements. Two employees generate roughly equal work, but one comes into the office to network with the boss and his peers and works in a more collaborative manner, the other is working remotely and requires more review of his deliverables and oversight and has very little camaraderie with his team. In many cases, the former will advance more rapidly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bch2014 said:

The US isn’t even in the top ten for confectionary consumption (lbs) per capita. The consumption medals go to Germany, Ireland, and Switzerland, all three of which have far lower obesity rates than the US.

 

We talking about tasty cakes or gourmet chocolates here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hoth said:

My comment was meant to be taken in a facetious light. It's fair to have some trepidation; the hasty development timeline for the vaccines concerned me as well, so I guess going forward with it was a matter of how I personally weigh the risks. I've known a few people that died and several more who had pretty severe cases in the last year, so I felt I'd rather take my chances with the vaccine, even if there are longer term risks.

Yeah I know your comment was meant to be comical, that being said there are plenty of those narratives being pushed, that if something doesn’t happen to you immediately then you have nothing to worry about. There are plenty of historical examples of approved/experimental medications and vaccines that have been pulled after discovering they were not safe to all as claimed. 

I think its great the vaccines are out there and that anyone can recieve if they choose. I hope it alleviates the fears in some about the virus and provides needed protection to high risk groups and those that want it. What I am not ok with is experimental vax shaming of people who choose to wait and the concept that these people should be effectively banned from society (passports) based on their personal choice over an experimental vaccine.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

This will just become another differentiator that employers use to determine bonuses and advancements. Two employees generate roughly equal work, but one comes into the office to network with the boss and his peers and works in a more collaborative manner, the other is working remotely and requires more review of his deliverables and oversight and has very little camaraderie with his team. In many cases, the former will advance more rapidly.

Schmoozing opens more doors than being a hard worker does in many fields. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, weathafella said:

I don’t get why sleeping in a bit is a sign of a bad employee.   I worked at a location other than home for 50 years.   The biggest pain was getting less sleep than I should in order to get showered and dressed and travel to work so I could be there on time.   If a remote worker can do the same things and have better work life balance why is that bad?   If I were paying rent or buying office space I’d push remote work for those where it doesn’t make a difference.   There are some face to face times but the overall benefit for the company and employee is high.  
 

Since I retired, I’ve had a part time remote gig (1 day/week).    I realize that the work can get done and indeed I own the schedule more so everyone is happy.    In fact, if anything I’m giving them more than their $$ worth.    But admittedly I have the luxury of saying no at any time.

I am an employer who hires almost exclusively high-end engineers, scientists, and other technical people. 

WFH is fine for many people, but there is a segment of the population for which it is a disaster and can spiral their careers into the toilet. They need more oversight. With the freedom and flexibility of WFH comes greater demands on personal responsibility. I have found that many Americans have not been taught basic timekeeping and scheduling skills, and many of them are also really terrible at taking general guidance and distilling it down into discrete tasks. You wouldn't believe how few people under 30 I have hired that even know how to take notes on a call. Apparently you don't do that in college anymore, everything is printed out and handed to you. So they are not very useful when listening to someone give a technical briefing over a Zoom call and then left to their own devices. They just sit there all day. In an office environment, they would get to see activity buzzing after the meeting and be able to mimic the work efforts of their peers (fake it until they make it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

Schmoozing opens more doors than being a hard worker does in many fields. 

Agreed 100%.

I will provide a caveat and say that I have also found that there sometimes can be a strong overlap between those who refuse to "schmooze" and complain about it and those who also have delusions that they are a hard worker, when really they are just subpar at work and bad at normal social interactions.

The flip side is that there are also definitely those who are terrible workers but pop their head in my office 4 times a day with silly "great ideas" so it goes both ways!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PhineasC said:

Looks like the CDC updated their "best guess" in mid-March and are saying 99.35% now (0.65% of people die from COVID).

Of course, the deaths are still heavily clustered in the 65 and up age group with underlying diseases and can vary greatly between states and regions.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/planning-scenarios.html

Doesn't seem to change the overall situation, but OK.

I have zero issue with the vaccine being "deployed." I hope everyone has a chance to get it if they want it. No, I don't trust big pharma to always make the right call when they have zero liability on the line, so that's why I don't think this vaccine should be mandatory. That's all.

There have also been several studies citing mental and physical long term effects. In one case, a 21 year old from Florida was paralyzed from the neck down because covid attacked his spinal column. He counts as a survivor, but I don't count that was a victory. We barely know the long term effects of this illness. So if a person is in any way concerned about the vaccines safety, they should be equally concerned about the diseases long term effects. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

I am an employer who hires almost exclusively high-end engineers, scientists, and other technical people. 

WFH is fine for many people, but there is a segment of the population for which it is a disaster and can spiral their careers into the toilet. They need more oversight. With the freedom and flexibility of WFH comes greater demands on personal responsibility. I have found that many Americans have not been taught basic timekeeping and scheduling skills, and many of them are also really terrible at taking general guidance and distilling it down into discrete tasks. You wouldn't believe how few people under 30 I have hired that even  how to take notes on a call. Apparently you don't do that in college anymore, everything is printed out and handed to you. So they are not very useful when listening to someone give a technical briefing over a Zoom call and then left to their own devices. They just sit there all day. In an office environment, they would get to see activity buzzing after the meeting and be able to mimic the work efforts of their peers (fake it until they make it).

I get this argument.    New age parenting and current public education has turned out it many young adults unable to cope in the adult world.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, WhitinsvilleWX said:

I'm actually not worried in the least about mRNA effects. You have hundreds of strands of mRNA at any given time in almost every cell in your body coding for all manner of proteins most people cant even begin to pronounce. mRNA is pretty short lived. They get gobbled up pretty fast once they code for whatever protein they are designed to make. 

It was one of your posts that alleviated any concerns I had. I do listen to scientists on the front lines.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, WhitinsvilleWX said:

:D

How you feeling?

I get my second in 13 days

Fine very hungry today though so I just made a mad big pizza with sausage and soppressatta and 3 cheeses. That and a big ole iced coffee from cumbys. Life is good

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still wonder how WFH is going to effect cities. Interesting stuff.  Take 30% of commuters out of the equation would certainly change city planning 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

I still wonder how WFH is going to effect cities. Interesting stuff.  Take 30% of commuters out of the equation would certainly change city planning 

I have friends who are involved in commercial real estate in Boston and San Francisco and they said it has been bad but not apocalyptic.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, weathafella said:

I don’t get why sleeping in a bit is a sign of a bad employee.   I worked at a location other than home for 50 years.   The biggest pain was getting less sleep than I should in order to get showered and dressed and travel to work so I could be there on time.   If a remote worker can do the same things and have better work life balance why is that bad?   If I were paying rent or buying office space I’d push remote work for those where it doesn’t make a difference.   There are some face to face times but the overall benefit for the company and employee is high.  
 

Since I retired, I’ve had a part time remote gig (1 day/week).    I realize that the work can get done and indeed I own the schedule more so everyone is happy.    In fact, if anything I’m giving them more than their $$ worth.    But admittedly I have the luxury of saying no at any time.

Big corps have programmed the American workforce to practically drop dead on the job or someone else will. It has trickled down to small bizz over the years. Work life balance barely existed pre covid and while it is changing, too many corps are slow to give up oversight. If an employee’s production dropped WFH is not because they are WFH, it’s because they weren’t productive in the first place but you can never quantify their office productivity if they look like they are working. There was a girl at my previous job who spent more than half her day away from her desk chatting but hey, she was in the office. Productive/honest/loyal employees will excel anywhere but if you give them more work life balance WFH and they will crush it. I find myself working more WFH actually. Kids pass out and I jump on for an hour. If I’m in the office I’m out at 430 to pick up the kids by 6. WFH, I’m on until about 515/530 because I don’t have the agonizing 1hr drive home to get them. I’m less stressed, more motviated, and generally happier WFH. All of our friends say the same. Companies are foolish if they aren’t adapting, the best talent will go elsewhere. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

It was one of your posts that alleviated any concerns I had. I do listen to scientists on the front lines.

That was some of it for me too. It will be 2 weeks from my second Moderna shot on Friday. No immediate side effects, no tail or horn growth and I haven’t caught COVID either. It’s been a win-win so far.  I will say I’m probably closer to your lifestyle though Ginx. I usually don’t do big crowds in confined spaces. Occasional hockey or baseball games and once or twice a year if we travel for vacation. Most of my stuff is outside, golf and snowmobiling are pretty much cut out for staying away from crowds, with caveats about social situations that surround those activities. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

I still wonder how WFH is going to effect cities. Interesting stuff.  Take 30% of commuters out of the equation would certainly change city planning 

Yeah that’s the biggest thing I hear from friends who live near Boston and are now WFH is the amount of time they realized they got back in their lives without having to commute.  One friend lives north shore and works south shore, usually an hour commute each way.  He loves getting two hours back in his day to do things with his two toddlers.

That would be very hard to give up if you realize what life is like without that rat race commute and getting 2 hours a day back.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, HIPPYVALLEY said:

I have friends who are involved in commercial real estate in Boston and San Francisco and they said it has been bad but not apocalyptic.

 

Lots of people still want the vibe of living in a city.  Once the initial shock of the pandemic had receded living there continued to look attractive for some. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, NorEastermass128 said:

My 24 year old brother just quit a good paying white collar job that he got out of school because of the WFH regime. Quit and is landscaping for now. 

I feel like I have a foot in two different generational mindsets. On one hand, I'm old school in the sense that I love work. I like being challenged, I like fighting to be the best at my craft, and I like being part of a team that's serious and purpose driven. Sitting idle is hard for me. I can't imagine stopping work to do something like retire early. On the other hand, I'm definitely of the mindset that environment and flexibility matter. The goal is to find fulfillment and happiness at the end of the day. Very millennial lol.  

Having done 100% WFH twice now in my career, I like being in the office more. There's just a lot of value to the daily formal and informal interactions and ease of person to person communication in my space. Ideally, things would be a hybrid for me with WFH but what's most critical to me is the flexibility to take accrued leave or go virtual whenever I need. That's been critical to my ability to pursue storm chasing and other passions, and will be helpful when I start a family. That said, you gotta be able to flip the switch back and forth to be a reliable team member. Not everyone can do that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

Any new science related to singing and Covid?  We have a teenage daughter who is a theater/performance arts bug. This has been really rough on her 

Yeah, I feel bad for anybody who is a performer.  Restaurants  and breweries etc. around here, that are having live music again, are definitely letting performers get away with singing a few songs in their sets.  Silly rule anyway.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Yeah that’s the biggest thing I hear from friends who live near Boston and are now WFH is the amount of time they realized they got back in their lives without having to commute.  One friend lives north shore and works south shore, usually an hour commute each way.  He loves getting two hours back in his day to do things with his two toddlers.

That would be very hard to give up if you realize what life is like without that rat race commute and getting 2 hours a day back.

2hrs/day for me and 3hrs for my wife. Between the two us we’ve gained 25hrs of ‘life’ every week. More family time and even more work. It’s definitely a game changer. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

2hrs/day for me and 3hrs for my wife. Between the two us we’ve gained 25hrs of ‘life’ every week. More family time and even more work. It’s definitely a game changer. 

It’s also cutting down on the stress of commuting and the pollution that results from commuting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...