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Damage In Tolland

Your 8th Annual SNE Lawn Thread

480 posts in this topic

16 hours ago, amarshall said:

Now that I'm in the oyster business, I may be leaving the church of Lesco.   Fertilizer f'ing up our oysters.

May I ask where you're sourcing your seed from? 

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7 minutes ago, amarshall said:

We own the hatchery in Maine

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That's awesome. Cousin of mine owns Fishers Island Oysters. It's a fascinating business. 

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23 hours ago, backedgeapproaching said:

Remember too, if you drop it right after the snow melts, the soil temps will still be really cold, which also isn't ideal for germination.  You would probably want them to warm just a bit I would think.

We try to seed our winter logging roads before the snow (and ice) melts, and have had very good success.  Most of our seeding is conservation mix (or something like it), spread using a PTO in back of an ATV.  The catch is good, including the clover, and we're able to run the 4-wheelers w/o rutting up the surface.  Of course, we're not trying to grow lawns, rather we're stabilizing the soil and feeding the critters.

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I never understood the obsession with having a golf course-like lawn for your own.  Inferiority complex maybe?  

 

It's sad that in 2017 that people still pound fertilizer and pesticides with no consideration of the impact they have.

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27 minutes ago, tamarack said:

We try to seed our winter logging roads before the snow (and ice) melts, and have had very good success.  Most of our seeding is conservation mix (or something like it), spread using a PTO in back of an ATV.  The catch is good, including the clover, and we're able to run the 4-wheelers w/o rutting up the surface.  Of course, we're not trying to grow lawns, rather we're stabilizing the soil and feeding the critters.

Thoughts on this mix for our region?

https://www.naturesfinestseed.com/great-lakes-new-england-pasture-seed/great-lakes-new-england-poultry-forage-blend

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54 minutes ago, tunafish said:

I never understood the obsession with having a golf course-like lawn for your own.  Inferiority complex maybe?  

 

It's sad that in 2017 that people still pound fertilizer and pesticides with no consideration of the impact they have.

i think that some people prefer to have a nice looking yard. i don't think it has anything to do with an inferiority complex. for me, i get great satisfaction when people compliment me on it. i would much rather have that than people/neighbors complaining about it

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2 hours ago, dendrite said:

Lots of clover and other nitrogen-fixers; critters should love it.  I think the cons mix includes annual ryegrass, useful for quick germination when erosion control is important.  Maybe the flax covers that base?  Looks to cost about twice what we pay, but we use a couple hundred 50-lb bags annually.  One thing we like about cons mix is that it doesn't seem to spread away from where it first gets established, and when we return for the next harvest entry (15-20 years) it's about gone.  Given our issues with invasives, that's a plus.

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19 hours ago, SJonesWX said:

i think that some people prefer to have a nice looking yard. i don't think it has anything to do with an inferiority complex. for me, i get great satisfaction when people compliment me on it. i would much rather have that than people/neighbors complaining about it

I like having a nice looking yard, nothing wrong with that.  To me it's more of the need to have the greenest, most turf-like lawn on the street that I don't understand.  And achieving it by dumping tons of chemicals into the earth.  You can have a very nice looking yard without having it look like a golf course.

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17 hours ago, tamarack said:

Lots of clover and other nitrogen-fixers; critters should love it.  I think the cons mix includes annual ryegrass, useful for quick germination when erosion control is important.  Maybe the flax covers that base?  Looks to cost about twice what we pay, but we use a couple hundred 50-lb bags annually.  One thing we like about cons mix is that it doesn't seem to spread away from where it first gets established, and when we return for the next harvest entry (15-20 years) it's about gone.  Given our issues with invasives, that's a plus.

Thanks. Maybe I'll give it a try. Agway has a 50lb cons blend too with rye and clover. 

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On 4/4/2017 at 8:45 PM, Lava Rock said:

In addition to the 7300 sqft of grass we need to seed, we also need to seed another 10,000 sqft just beyond the grass. Planning on using wildflower seed. Any suggestions on a good mix? Lots of companies.

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Stupid question, but for seeding wildflowers, we don't need loam to get good establishment/growth do we? We excavated a large part of our property last Fall. As most know, part will be lawn, which we will bring in sand and loam, but wildflower area will be whatever dirt was left behind. Did we screw ourselves?

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1 minute ago, sunny&pleasant said:

Mo-town, 1st cut

 

 

IMG_1234.JPG

Looks awesome. Amazing what full sun will do this time of year vs partial sun like my area

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On 4/17/2017 at 10:08 AM, SJonesWX said:

heavy heavy acorns, I don't know how you do it DIT, living in your oak forest.

Hate them . For so many different reasons. Really hoping the gypsies crush all the leaves this year

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1 hour ago, Damage In Tolland said:

Hate them . For so many different reasons. Really hoping the gypsies crush all the leaves this year

Be careful what you wish for - trees under attack, whether from insect, disease or injury, often produce a humongous "stress crop" of seeds before running out of juice.  Then comes a whacking great arborist bill.  ;) 

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6 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Be careful what you wish for - trees under attack, whether from insect, disease or injury, often produce a humongous "stress crop" of seeds before running out of juice.  Then comes a whacking great arborist bill.  ;) 

I can think of only 1 or 2 years out of my 12 in this house that didn't produce a bumper crop. One of them was 2 years ago

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1 minute ago, Damage In Tolland said:

I can think of only 1 or 2 years out of my 12 in this house that didn't produce a bumper crop. One of them was 2 years ago

Open grown oaks, especially red oak, are good at that.  Whenever I've looked for acorns to plant (on my woodlot, on a State lot, each to add wildlife food down the road), I go to the same beach/park south of Augusta, as the open grown oaks there have a good crop essentially every year.  Forest grown oaks, not so much - maybe 2-in-5.

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5 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Open grown oaks, especially red oak, are good at that.  Whenever I've looked for acorns to plant (on my woodlot, on a State lot, each to add wildlife food down the road), I go to the same beach/park south of Augusta, as the open grown oaks there have a good crop essentially every year.  Forest grown oaks, not so much - maybe 2-in-5.

Stop by on your way to NJ next time. You can have every single hundreds of thousands of them 

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7 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Open grown oaks, especially red oak, are good at that.  Whenever I've looked for acorns to plant (on my woodlot, on a State lot, each to add wildlife food down the road), I go to the same beach/park south of Augusta, as the open grown oaks there have a good crop essentially every year.  Forest grown oaks, not so much - maybe 2-in-5.

Have you tried planting any of those blight resistant American chestnuts?

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