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NNE Cold Season Thread 2023/2024


bwt3650
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8 minutes ago, Ginx snewx said:

Take um up. Colder scenarios 

 

Wasn’t this expected?  Why take them up?

This first burst is 4-8” with spot 10” amounts above 1000-2000ft for the Green Mountais.

I’m not trying to be a dink, just trying to see what I am missing that might make this go over guidance.

 

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8 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Wasn’t this expected?  Why take them up?

This first burst is 4-8” with spot 10” amounts above 1500-2000ft for the Green Mountais.

 

Euro doesn't show that.  Tons of spillover upslope as well. High ratio stuff. We shall see I guess

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1 hour ago, powderfreak said:

Yeah, not sure why it’s a bad take that the valley won’t get 9”. :lol:

The data has been very stable in showing how this works out.  Biggest gradient from 500-1500ft.

Anecdotally, my friend who lives at 650’ in Montpelier has been all snow for the event.  Up the hill here at 1200’ we have 2” down and dumping big fatties.  

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45 minutes ago, EMontpelierWhiteout said:

Anecdotally, my friend who lives at 650’ in Montpelier has been all snow for the event.  Up the hill here at 1200’ we have 2” down and dumping big fatties.  

The east side of the Spine is getting the QPF during this first part of the system.  SSE flow currently.  Then NNW flow starting later tomorrow.  The NW flow will move the radar echoes to the west side.

IMG_8579.jpeg.59c040af50aa42c98795576124778668.jpeg

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Just now, powderfreak said:

The east side of the Spine is getting the QPF during this first part of the system.  SSE flow currently.  Then NNW flow starting later tomorrow.  The NW flow will move the radar echoes to the west side.

IMG_8579.jpeg.59c040af50aa42c98795576124778668.jpeg

This type of flow is where I usually do best. Too bad it wasn’t 2 weeks ago and 10° colder. 

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45 minutes ago, dmcginvt said:

At 820' i have 2 inches so far, allyns cam at 4 and it's dumping.  Stowe's cam died.  Go fix PF :) nevermind appears to be back now its only at 2

 

3 inches now those cat paws added up quickly!!  20 minutes of cat paws

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I eyeballed around 6 inches and Alex confirmed with a text. Very very dense snow. Still getting precip but it's not 100% snow.

Chickadees doing their cheeseburger calls, and some Redwinged blackbirds.

Definitely spring snow

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Jeez,  that was a hard cleanup.  7.5" of snow then heavy rain.  Snowblower does not work well at situations like this.  Neighbor had a 4-wheeler with chains and plow and did the driveway.   Warm and partly cloudy now.

Is it over?  Don't think so.  Strong winds, falling temperatures with snow showers.  Maybe 1-2" more if the pesky Greens don't block it.  

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Below is the north to south listing of available snowfall totals that I saw for this winter storm cycle as of the early morning reports from the Vermont ski areas. It looks like roughly 8-12” up and down the spine with a few areas above and below that range.

Jay Peak: 8”

Burke: 6”

Smuggler’s Notch: 7”

Stowe: 8”

Bolton Valley: 8”

Mad River Glen: 12”

Sugarbush: 9”

Middlebury: 8”

Saskadena Six: 8”

Pico: 9”

Killington: 9”

Okemo: 13”

Bromley: 10”

Magic Mountain: 12”

Stratton: 12”

Mount Snow: 8”

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We headed up this morning for a session at Bolton Valley to check out the snow from the front end of this current storm cycle, and as the resort snow reports from around the state have indicated, the higher elevations received a solid shot of snow. We’ve picked up roughly 1.4 inches of liquid equivalent in the snow and mixed precipitation that has fallen down at the house, so up on the mountain they’ve likely seen upwards of an inch and a half of liquid equivalent in their accumulations. That’s certainly enough for a solid resurfacing, and they’re all set in that regard all the way from the summit areas above 3,000’ down to the lowest slopes at 1,500’.

Bolton’s early morning snow report was indicating 8 inches of new snow, but my own measurements while out on the mountain up above 3,000’ were already reading 10 to 12 inches by midday, so they’d obviously continued to pick up some substantial accumulations since that first report. Their midday report is now indicating 10 to 12 inches new, so that lines right up with what I was finding. As noted above, it was a solid resurfacing, and I’d say we were getting 95%+ bottomless turns on even the steepest slope angles, with just a few spots here and there where you might touch down depending on skier traffic, obstacles, deposition, etc.

The only knock against the snow at this point is that it’s rather dense, so the usual caveats apply with respect to the quality of the turns. We suspected that the snow was going to be dense going into today’s session, so we went with alpine setups instead of Telemark, and that was definitely the right call for stability and ease of turning in the thick snow. Snowboards would also have been a good choice for what we saw out there, and skiing in and on the snow today had me thinking fondly of some of those surfy turns on a board. The snow became denser the lower one went in elevation, so although we parked at Timberline in the morning, we stayed above 2,000’ essentially the whole time, and only returned back down below that when were we heading back to the car at 1,500’ at the Timberline Base. The powder turns out there are still great, since the snow is so dense that you can really lay into whatever you want and tackle any pitch with the confidence of not dealing with underlying obstacles, but both the powder and groomed conditions are better the higher you go. While the new snow was dense, it wasn’t wet or sticky until we dropped down toward the Timberline Base around midday. That was likely a result of both the initial snow being wetter, and temperatures creeping above freezing in the lower elevations by that point. If the snow transitions to a drier consistently for the next part of the storm cycle as the forecasts suggests, it should be an excellent topping off for what’s fallen thus far.

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40 minutes ago, wxeyeNH said:

RIP to the 20 year old kid who fell 600 feet in Tuckerman's this weekend.  2 others were rescued.  This is the 21rst death on the mountain since the year 2000.

I hadn’t heard about that. Tough for everyone involved.

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13 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

I hadn’t heard about that. Tough for everyone involved.

The rescue/recovery efforts lasted well into the night. There have been too many backcountry deaths. But you can't stop people from doing the things that make them feel alive. 

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There was also a guy from Kentucky who had to be rescued last week. They said he got off the trail, fell and hit his head and lost a sneaker. It always amazes me how people will go out there without a clue on being prepared. I don’t even wear my sneakers to walk to my car in my driveway when there is snow on the ground. 

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23 minutes ago, #NoPoles said:

The rescue/recovery efforts lasted well into the night. There have been too many backcountry deaths. But you can't stop people from doing the things that make them feel alive. 

Sad stuff. The price of admission can be very high.  You need to know what you are getting into.  600 vertical feet is a terrifying fall.  This isn’t making light of it, but the temperature is a full degree or two different from the starting and stopping points. Thats a long fall.

IMG_8601.jpeg.9581025554aca758fa51373769854529.jpeg

 

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A real tragedy. 

Can't understand what these people who are putting themselves and their rescuers in danger are thinking quite frankly. Is it just simple lack of awareness about preparation and the conditions they will face, does a mobile phone provide some sort of security blanket, i.e., if I get in trouble I'll just make a call, youthful invincibility or is it trying to emulate social media influencers and/or post 'cool, look-at-me' stuff on the internet?

A MWV skier who is widely followed on social media posted video from the floor of the ravine last Thursday. The place is a complete mess - crevasses, waterfalls, rocks sticking out, low snow levels - the little headwall below the ravine is a waterfall. Under these weather conditions, huge blocks of ice are separating from the walls and tumbling down. It's crazy. The parts of the Sherburne trail shown in the video had almost little snow and lots of patches of dirt.

 

 

 

 

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