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CoastalWx

SNE snowstorm memories.

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Indeed he is, already made a few posts.

http://www.americanw...04-typhoon-tip/

I'm thrilled he is. Pathetic that immature insults drove him off the board. He is one of our most dedicated and knowledgeable weenies on the board! He loves to confuse the hell out of us sometimes with his terminology but you learn from him. Thrilled hes back.

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Really enjoying this thread as a N mid-atl outsider. The accounts/descriptions of 12/9/05 are truly fascinating in all aspects.

In terms of my first weather memories, I have random vague images of playing in the snow in the early 90s, including being outside the day of the first WTC bombings as it snowed very lightly. And I was thoroughly dissapointed that the special report trumped Woody the Woodpecker that day lol. Anyway, the first REAL significant storm events I can trace back to are the following:

-92 noreaster, looking out my back door at a rainy bare ground and the tall oaks bending down in the wind like I had never seen before.

-93 Superstorm I remember waking up and looking outside to an all out blizzard. Was outside for most of the day as nearly a foot accumulated and recall being forced inside by the change to sleet stinging my face. The next morning I was riding my big whealie on top of the 10" cement ice block on my driveway as my dad picked away at it with an axe.

-94 icestorms were epic in central NJ. By far the worst this area has ever seen in my lifetime (though the small area in the se part of my county that was struck with ZR on 2/14/07 might argue otherwise)

-2/4-5/95 was a big snowstorm(it's a KU case) I traced backed my memories to.

From 95-96 winter on, I literally remember every single snowstorm.

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Really enjoying this thread as a N mid-atl outsider. The accounts/descriptions of 12/9/05 are truly fascinating in all aspects.

In terms of my first weather memories, I have random vague images of playing in the snow in the early 90s, including being outside the day of the first WTC bombings as it snowed very lightly. And I was thoroughly dissapointed that the special report trumped Woody the Woodpecker that day lol. Anyway, the first REAL significant storm events I can trace back to are the following:

-92 noreaster, looking out my back door at a rainy bare ground and the tall oaks bending down in the wind like I had never seen before.

-93 Superstorm I remember waking up and looking outside to an all out blizzard. Was outside for most of the day as nearly a foot accumulated and recall being forced inside by the change to sleet stinging my face. The next morning I was riding my big whealie on top of the 10" cement ice block on my driveway as my dad picked away at it with an axe.

-94 icestorms were epic in central NJ. By far the worst this area has ever seen in my lifetime (though the small area in the se part of my county that was struck with ZR on 2/14/07 might argue otherwise)

-2/4-5/95 was a big snowstorm(it's a KU case) I traced backed my memories to.

From 95-96 winter on, I literally remember every single snowstorm.

We have a lot to relive in this thread since 1992....starting with that Dec '92 storm. We've certainly been in a good streak for great events. Though I would say maybe we are starting to get due for another one. We really haven't had an amazing winter event since 12/9/05. We had some fun events in '07-'08 and '08-'09...but nothing truly remarkable unless you lived where I was and the rest of the relatively small area that was absolutely demolished in the December 2008 ice storm.

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The storm where the temp rose obscenely was probably Jan 27-28, 1994. I remember we were near 0F on the 27th and then by the morning of the 28th we hit 50F. We did get a lot of icing before the temp spiked up though from what I remember.

Farmington had -30 the morning of 1/27/94, then went up to 40 on the 28th, 4" snow followed by 1" RA. It's not often in the east one sees 70F change from one day to the next.

Yet to experience a snowstorm in SNE; seen a few in NNJ and Maine. ;)

Those pics of 12/08 ice bring back memories of 1/1998. Damage IMBY looked somewhat similar, though other areas I saw then were even worse, and '98 sets the standard for widespread ice. I know of no other ice storm with anywhere near the areal coverage of that one.

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One of my favorite snowstorms occurred on Feb 17th 2003. PD 2 I believe It was a great storm from ACK to NH, a windwhipped frenzy storm with 2-3 per hour rates. Descriptions and pics below. Great times at WWBB on this one as weenies were chucked , DT flipped out, but in the end it was a cold fantastic storm.

With an exceptionally strong high pressure system over New England, a low pressure system developed off the Mid Atlantic Coast. Periods of light snow developed as northeast winds increased to around 15 mph across Southern CT Sunday evening, February 16th. Snow became widespread and heavy, falling at rates up to 2 to 3 inches per hour Sunday night and Monday, February 17th. Heavy snow blown by northeast winds 20 to 30 mph caused near blizzard conditions throughout the area. Record heavy snowfalls crippled mass transit. In addition, widespread minor tidal flooding accompanied this system. Storm Total Snowfall ranged from around 13 to 24 inches. Here are selected specific snowfall amounts for: Fairfield County: from 16.0 inches at Norwalk to 24.0 inches at New Fairfield. At Sikorsky Airport in Bridgeport, 17.0 inches was measured. New Haven County: from 15.0 inches at Milford to 24.0 inches at Wolcott. Middlesex County: from 15.0 inches at Haddam to 15.7 inches at Old Saybrook. New London County: from 13.0 inches at Taftville to 21.0 inches at Preston. major winter storm impacted southern New England with heavy snow and strong winds as it tracked southeast of Nantucket. Snowfall totals of 12 to 20 inches were widely observed in Hartford, Tolland, and Windham counties. A major winter storm impacted southern New England on Presidents Day with heavy snow and strong winds. This was the most significant snowstorm of the winter, with totals of 1 to 2 feet reported throughout the state. The highest totals, around 2 feet, were reported in two areas: one from the east slopes of the Berkshires into northern Worcester County, and the second over Boston's South Shore communities. This snowstorm ranked in the top 10 for Boston and Worcester in detailed records dating back to at least the early 1900s. Despite the tremendous snowfall totals, the overall impact of the storm was minimal since it occurred on a holiday and during school vacation week. However, numerous minor accidents were reported. In addition, no significant damage was reported due to the fluffy, light nature of the snow. Officially, the storm total at Logan International Airport in Boston was 27.5 inches, which set a record for the greatest snowstorm in Boston. The total eclipsed the previous record of 27.1 inches set during the Blizzard of 1978 on February 6th and 7th, though it should be noted that this storm had much less of an impact on the region and pales in overall comparison to the Blizzard of 1978. That storm produced high winds, significant coastal flooding, and more than 3 feet of snow in some areas, crippling the state for several days. The 27.5 inches of snow in Boston also set a record for the greatest 24 hour snowfall total, breaking the previous record of 25.4 inches set during the April Fools Blizzard on March 31st and April 1st 1997. The snowstorm also helped set the February snowfall record in Boston, which reached 41.6 inches and broke the previous record of 41.3 inches set in 1969. Other official snowfall totals included 24.7 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 20.8 inches at Worcester Airport, and 17.8 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Some specific snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 28 inches in Rockport; 27 inches in Winthrop and Brookline; 26 inches in South Weymouth; 25 inches in Montgomery, Milton, and Hanson; 24 inches in Townsend and Topsfield, 23 inches in Ashfield, Leverett, Petersham, Norwood, and Hingham; 20 inches in Sunderland, Easthampton, Shrewsbury, Boxboro, Framingham, Manchester, West Medway, and Mansfield, 18 inches in Deerfield, Hampden, Worthington, Westborough, Hudson, Hopkinton, Acushnet, and Marshfield; 16 inches in Springfield, Westhampton, downtown Worcester, Sterling, Pepperell, Amesbury, Newburyport, Pocasset, and Chatham; 15 inches in Holyoke, Wilbraham, Leominster, Natick, North Andover, Hyannis, and Nantucket; 13 inches in Edgartown; and 12 inches in Stoneham

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One of my favorite snowstorms occurred on Feb 17th 2003. PD 2 I believe It was a great storm from ACK to NH, a windwhipped frenzy storm with 2-3 per hour rates. Descriptions and pics below. Great times at WWBB on this one as weenies were chucked , DT flipped out, but in the end it was a cold fantastic storm.

With an exceptionally strong high pressure system over New England, a low pressure system developed off the Mid Atlantic Coast. Periods of light snow developed as northeast winds increased to around 15 mph across Southern CT Sunday evening, February 16th. Snow became widespread and heavy, falling at rates up to 2 to 3 inches per hour Sunday night and Monday, February 17th. Heavy snow blown by northeast winds 20 to 30 mph caused near blizzard conditions throughout the area. Record heavy snowfalls crippled mass transit. In addition, widespread minor tidal flooding accompanied this system. Storm Total Snowfall ranged from around 13 to 24 inches. Here are selected specific snowfall amounts for: Fairfield County: from 16.0 inches at Norwalk to 24.0 inches at New Fairfield. At Sikorsky Airport in Bridgeport, 17.0 inches was measured. New Haven County: from 15.0 inches at Milford to 24.0 inches at Wolcott. Middlesex County: from 15.0 inches at Haddam to 15.7 inches at Old Saybrook. New London County: from 13.0 inches at Taftville to 21.0 inches at Preston. major winter storm impacted southern New England with heavy snow and strong winds as it tracked southeast of Nantucket. Snowfall totals of 12 to 20 inches were widely observed in Hartford, Tolland, and Windham counties. A major winter storm impacted southern New England on Presidents Day with heavy snow and strong winds. This was the most significant snowstorm of the winter, with totals of 1 to 2 feet reported throughout the state. The highest totals, around 2 feet, were reported in two areas: one from the east slopes of the Berkshires into northern Worcester County, and the second over Boston's South Shore communities. This snowstorm ranked in the top 10 for Boston and Worcester in detailed records dating back to at least the early 1900s. Despite the tremendous snowfall totals, the overall impact of the storm was minimal since it occurred on a holiday and during school vacation week. However, numerous minor accidents were reported. In addition, no significant damage was reported due to the fluffy, light nature of the snow. Officially, the storm total at Logan International Airport in Boston was 27.5 inches, which set a record for the greatest snowstorm in Boston. The total eclipsed the previous record of 27.1 inches set during the Blizzard of 1978 on February 6th and 7th, though it should be noted that this storm had much less of an impact on the region and pales in overall comparison to the Blizzard of 1978. That storm produced high winds, significant coastal flooding, and more than 3 feet of snow in some areas, crippling the state for several days. The 27.5 inches of snow in Boston also set a record for the greatest 24 hour snowfall total, breaking the previous record of 25.4 inches set during the April Fools Blizzard on March 31st and April 1st 1997. The snowstorm also helped set the February snowfall record in Boston, which reached 41.6 inches and broke the previous record of 41.3 inches set in 1969. Other official snowfall totals included 24.7 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 20.8 inches at Worcester Airport, and 17.8 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Some specific snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 28 inches in Rockport; 27 inches in Winthrop and Brookline; 26 inches in South Weymouth; 25 inches in Montgomery, Milton, and Hanson; 24 inches in Townsend and Topsfield, 23 inches in Ashfield, Leverett, Petersham, Norwood, and Hingham; 20 inches in Sunderland, Easthampton, Shrewsbury, Boxboro, Framingham, Manchester, West Medway, and Mansfield, 18 inches in Deerfield, Hampden, Worthington, Westborough, Hudson, Hopkinton, Acushnet, and Marshfield; 16 inches in Springfield, Westhampton, downtown Worcester, Sterling, Pepperell, Amesbury, Newburyport, Pocasset, and Chatham; 15 inches in Holyoke, Wilbraham, Leominster, Natick, North Andover, Hyannis, and Nantucket; 13 inches in Edgartown; and 12 inches in Stoneham

I don't know if you saw my pics from PDII Steve, but I had close to 2' as well. I'll have to scan them and put them on here.

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One of my favorite snowstorms occurred on Feb 17th 2003. PD 2 I believe It was a great storm from ACK to NH, a windwhipped frenzy storm with 2-3 per hour rates. Descriptions and pics below. Great times at WWBB on this one as weenies were chucked , DT flipped out, but in the end it was a cold fantastic storm.

With an exceptionally strong high pressure system over New England, a low pressure system developed off the Mid Atlantic Coast. Periods of light snow developed as northeast winds increased to around 15 mph across Southern CT Sunday evening, February 16th. Snow became widespread and heavy, falling at rates up to 2 to 3 inches per hour Sunday night and Monday, February 17th. Heavy snow blown by northeast winds 20 to 30 mph caused near blizzard conditions throughout the area. Record heavy snowfalls crippled mass transit. In addition, widespread minor tidal flooding accompanied this system. Storm Total Snowfall ranged from around 13 to 24 inches. Here are selected specific snowfall amounts for: Fairfield County: from 16.0 inches at Norwalk to 24.0 inches at New Fairfield. At Sikorsky Airport in Bridgeport, 17.0 inches was measured. New Haven County: from 15.0 inches at Milford to 24.0 inches at Wolcott. Middlesex County: from 15.0 inches at Haddam to 15.7 inches at Old Saybrook. New London County: from 13.0 inches at Taftville to 21.0 inches at Preston. major winter storm impacted southern New England with heavy snow and strong winds as it tracked southeast of Nantucket. Snowfall totals of 12 to 20 inches were widely observed in Hartford, Tolland, and Windham counties. A major winter storm impacted southern New England on Presidents Day with heavy snow and strong winds. This was the most significant snowstorm of the winter, with totals of 1 to 2 feet reported throughout the state. The highest totals, around 2 feet, were reported in two areas: one from the east slopes of the Berkshires into northern Worcester County, and the second over Boston's South Shore communities. This snowstorm ranked in the top 10 for Boston and Worcester in detailed records dating back to at least the early 1900s. Despite the tremendous snowfall totals, the overall impact of the storm was minimal since it occurred on a holiday and during school vacation week. However, numerous minor accidents were reported. In addition, no significant damage was reported due to the fluffy, light nature of the snow. Officially, the storm total at Logan International Airport in Boston was 27.5 inches, which set a record for the greatest snowstorm in Boston. The total eclipsed the previous record of 27.1 inches set during the Blizzard of 1978 on February 6th and 7th, though it should be noted that this storm had much less of an impact on the region and pales in overall comparison to the Blizzard of 1978. That storm produced high winds, significant coastal flooding, and more than 3 feet of snow in some areas, crippling the state for several days. The 27.5 inches of snow in Boston also set a record for the greatest 24 hour snowfall total, breaking the previous record of 25.4 inches set during the April Fools Blizzard on March 31st and April 1st 1997. The snowstorm also helped set the February snowfall record in Boston, which reached 41.6 inches and broke the previous record of 41.3 inches set in 1969. Other official snowfall totals included 24.7 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 20.8 inches at Worcester Airport, and 17.8 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Some specific snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 28 inches in Rockport; 27 inches in Winthrop and Brookline; 26 inches in South Weymouth; 25 inches in Montgomery, Milton, and Hanson; 24 inches in Townsend and Topsfield, 23 inches in Ashfield, Leverett, Petersham, Norwood, and Hingham; 20 inches in Sunderland, Easthampton, Shrewsbury, Boxboro, Framingham, Manchester, West Medway, and Mansfield, 18 inches in Deerfield, Hampden, Worthington, Westborough, Hudson, Hopkinton, Acushnet, and Marshfield; 16 inches in Springfield, Westhampton, downtown Worcester, Sterling, Pepperell, Amesbury, Newburyport, Pocasset, and Chatham; 15 inches in Holyoke, Wilbraham, Leominster, Natick, North Andover, Hyannis, and Nantucket; 13 inches in Edgartown; and 12 inches in Stoneham

Did you write that?

Dude, that was epic

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I don't know if you saw my pics from PDII Steve, but I had close to 2' as well. I'll have to scan them and put them on here.

No I did not, please do

Dave LOL

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One of my favorite snowstorms occurred on Feb 17th 2003. PD 2 I believe It was a great storm from ACK to NH, a windwhipped frenzy storm with 2-3 per hour rates. Descriptions and pics below. Great times at WWBB on this one as weenies were chucked , DT flipped out, but in the end it was a cold fantastic storm.

With an exceptionally strong high pressure system over New England, a low pressure system developed off the Mid Atlantic Coast. Periods of light snow developed as northeast winds increased to around 15 mph across Southern CT Sunday evening, February 16th. Snow became widespread and heavy, falling at rates up to 2 to 3 inches per hour Sunday night and Monday, February 17th. Heavy snow blown by northeast winds 20 to 30 mph caused near blizzard conditions throughout the area. Record heavy snowfalls crippled mass transit. In addition, widespread minor tidal flooding accompanied this system. Storm Total Snowfall ranged from around 13 to 24 inches. Here are selected specific snowfall amounts for: Fairfield County: from 16.0 inches at Norwalk to 24.0 inches at New Fairfield. At Sikorsky Airport in Bridgeport, 17.0 inches was measured. New Haven County: from 15.0 inches at Milford to 24.0 inches at Wolcott. Middlesex County: from 15.0 inches at Haddam to 15.7 inches at Old Saybrook. New London County: from 13.0 inches at Taftville to 21.0 inches at Preston. major winter storm impacted southern New England with heavy snow and strong winds as it tracked southeast of Nantucket. Snowfall totals of 12 to 20 inches were widely observed in Hartford, Tolland, and Windham counties. A major winter storm impacted southern New England on Presidents Day with heavy snow and strong winds. This was the most significant snowstorm of the winter, with totals of 1 to 2 feet reported throughout the state. The highest totals, around 2 feet, were reported in two areas: one from the east slopes of the Berkshires into northern Worcester County, and the second over Boston's South Shore communities. This snowstorm ranked in the top 10 for Boston and Worcester in detailed records dating back to at least the early 1900s. Despite the tremendous snowfall totals, the overall impact of the storm was minimal since it occurred on a holiday and during school vacation week. However, numerous minor accidents were reported. In addition, no significant damage was reported due to the fluffy, light nature of the snow. Officially, the storm total at Logan International Airport in Boston was 27.5 inches, which set a record for the greatest snowstorm in Boston. The total eclipsed the previous record of 27.1 inches set during the Blizzard of 1978 on February 6th and 7th, though it should be noted that this storm had much less of an impact on the region and pales in overall comparison to the Blizzard of 1978. That storm produced high winds, significant coastal flooding, and more than 3 feet of snow in some areas, crippling the state for several days. The 27.5 inches of snow in Boston also set a record for the greatest 24 hour snowfall total, breaking the previous record of 25.4 inches set during the April Fools Blizzard on March 31st and April 1st 1997. The snowstorm also helped set the February snowfall record in Boston, which reached 41.6 inches and broke the previous record of 41.3 inches set in 1969. Other official snowfall totals included 24.7 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 20.8 inches at Worcester Airport, and 17.8 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Some specific snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 28 inches in Rockport; 27 inches in Winthrop and Brookline; 26 inches in South Weymouth; 25 inches in Montgomery, Milton, and Hanson; 24 inches in Townsend and Topsfield, 23 inches in Ashfield, Leverett, Petersham, Norwood, and Hingham; 20 inches in Sunderland, Easthampton, Shrewsbury, Boxboro, Framingham, Manchester, West Medway, and Mansfield, 18 inches in Deerfield, Hampden, Worthington, Westborough, Hudson, Hopkinton, Acushnet, and Marshfield; 16 inches in Springfield, Westhampton, downtown Worcester, Sterling, Pepperell, Amesbury, Newburyport, Pocasset, and Chatham; 15 inches in Holyoke, Wilbraham, Leominster, Natick, North Andover, Hyannis, and Nantucket; 13 inches in Edgartown; and 12 inches in Stoneham

What's with the War and Peace post? Did Alex get ahold of your laptop?

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nice memory from last year ....MLK storm.

I had a friend who bought a house on the same street i grew up on in raynham, ma.

I was excited to get the invite to a buddies house ..next town over b/c the storm was supposed to have heavier accums further south.....and i lived about 40 miles north of that.

During the party the topic turned to weather and i was saying how there was gonna be a sharp cut off somewhere and that i hoped the snow would hurry up and get in here. A few minutes later i had my buddy turn on the computer and i was just tryin to get a look at the radar. Big heavy band rippin at the s. coast and leading edge of flurries only about an hour or so out ahead of it. I was pumped.....first real snow storm since i left for fl 9 years ago. I went from socializing and hanging out by the bar to hanging out by the nearest window that had a good view of a street light. My trained eye studied the dark space looking for one lone flurry to start things off. Finally the flurries comenced, and low and behold by the time i had done a bit more socializing and looked out again the ground was covered and the temp had dropped a good five degrees. In the next two hours approx 3.5 inches of snow fell and the visibility was about 1/8 of a mile sometime after midnite for the ride home. It was heaven. Woke up that morning and grabbed my gf's iphone radar....looked at public info totals and saw places in ct and ri as well as cape nearing 2 feet. There was approx. 15 inches that morning ....biggest storm i have witnessed since returning. Only bad news was back home in Burlington there was maybe 7 inches of snow/ pure powder. Too bad the storm wasn't another 60 miles north.

Other than that the retrograding low last year was cool because the winds were howling and the visibilty was near zero fot a time driving down route 93 from haverhill, ma around 1 or so am.

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89 Thanksgiving snow, I was about 2-3 months old and I remember seeing family photos from that time with a lot of snow on the ground seen through the windows of my house.

Also does anyone remember the OES event that brough 6" of snow to Harwich, MA, it must have been in the late 90s or early 2000s? Does anyone know the most significant OES events in recorded history for Cape Cod, MA? Also any summaries or information on the Mar 2-5th 1960 Blizzard?

I don't remember the February 25-26th 1999 snowstorm all that much, don't remember much from the years before 2004 winter. Given that I was not into weather like I have been after the 2004 hurricane season. However I do remember the snowstorms of the Blizzard of 1996, the PDII snowstorms of 2003 and other OES events that were more minor in nature like 2-4".

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89 Thanksgiving snow, I was about 2-3 months old and I remember seeing family photos from that time with a lot of snow on the ground seen through the windows of my house.

Also does anyone remember the OES event that brough 6" of snow to Harwich, MA, it must have been in the late 90s or early 2000s? Does anyone know the most significant OES events in recorded history for Cape Cod, MA? Also any summaries or information on the Mar 2-5th 1960 Blizzard?

I don't remember the February 25-26th 1999 snowstorm all that much, don't remember much from the years before 2004 winter. Given that I was not into weather like I have been after the 2004 hurricane season. However I do remember the snowstorms of the Blizzard of 1996, the PDII snowstorms of 2003 and other OES events that were more minor in nature like 2-4".

i think i remember the 89' turket event.....there appeared to be a good 6 inches of snow falling.

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Feb 17 2003 was the most uninteresting 20 something inches of snow, ever.

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Wonder how many remember the other 1983 major storm. Jan 15th and 16th was a strong storm which raked the NE, places like ALB had 25 Burlington 18. A real CF set up in my area of Ashaway RI in SW RI. My notes read , Jan 14 th NWS has winter storm watch up for expected 8-16 on the 15-16th. Sat the 15th- major storm began at 11am,very strange precip with heavy snow to rain to snow every hour, final total eight inches, reports from Mass of 18 and Northern CT 20. Winds sustained 25-30 with gusts to 50 total precip 1.75

The below map shows that I sat on the boundary line.anybody else remember this one?

42d4d0aa-45f3-7a0f.jpg

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Any information on a possible 6"+ OES event for Cape Cod, MA in the past?

Well, not true OES, but a couple of Cape specials that were likely OES enhanced.

2/3/96. This storm got se mass and the Cape hard, I remember I had close to 7" in Brockton, but it was a very cold storm.

post-33-0-79439000-1290558600.png

Potent little clipper on 2/26/94. This one I remember got me excited, because there was thundersnow over the Midwest with this. I think I only had 5" at home, but it literally came in about 2-3hrs.

post-33-0-66048300-1290558761.png

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Well, not true OES, but a couple of Cape specials that were likely OES enhanced.

2/3/96. This storm got se mass and the Cape hard, I remember I had close to 7" in Brockton, but it was a very cold storm.

post-33-0-79439000-1290558600.png

Potent little clipper on 2/26/94. This one I remember got me excited, because there was thundersnow over the Midwest with this. I think I only had 5" at home, but it literally came in about 2-3hrs.

post-33-0-66048300-1290558761.png

When I was in college in 76 there was a tremendous OES event from SECT to the Cape on SE winds, think Westerly had 12 inches, just inland 7 miles had zippo. Arctic air was entrenched, temps were near 5 when the slight flow off the Atlantic deposited the bands, very neat event but extremely localized.

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When I was in college in 76 there was a tremendous OES event from SECT to the Cape on SE winds, think Westerly had 12 inches, just inland 7 miles had zippo. Arctic air was entrenched, temps were near 5 when the slight flow off the Atlantic deposited the bands, very neat event but extremely localized.

I've seen that happen. It's almost more coastal front generated, but it can happen. You have light se winds overriding arctic air. We saw something like that during 12/20/08 in se mass. S.Weymouth-Brockton was the target zone.

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Any information on a possible 6"+ OES event for Cape Cod, MA in the past?

It wasn't pure OES but there was definite ocean enchancement....the norlun trough of February 19, 1993....it hit Chatham with 20" of snow...and most of the Cape had over a foot.

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