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June 13 Severe Event


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1 hour ago, Possum said:

Whew. Last night snuck up on me in Humboldt Park. I had all of my friends/housemates who live upstairs come down to the basement when the sirens started going off, and immediately after that they issued the updated the tor warn with my house in the center of the polygon’s path. I’ve only lived in Chicago for 6 years but seeing that couplet turn right and make a beeline for my neighborhood was the most scared I’ve felt here. 

Luckily the rotation kept turning right and passed us to the south, and once we were out of danger the storm was extremely enjoyable. We all went out and sat under the sunroom porch to watch the lightning show as the storm passed to the southeast. Had several very close CG’s no more than .2 miles away where the flash and boom were almost simultaneous. Easily the best thunder and lightning I’ve experienced here. Even had a few dime-sized hailstones. No damage to my house or garden, and I’m glad for the .44” of rain we got to help my plants get through the 100 degree heat moving in today. Overall it ended up being a great storm, crazy to consider how easily it could’ve been a tragedy.

nice report, don't be a stranger

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Just a couple other random obs about yesterday.

I noticed a constant gentle thunder for a good 20-30 minutes before it arrived.  It seemed like there were practically no breaks to it.  Anyone else around Chi metro notice that?

The other thing was the sky.  It went from gradually getting darker to an absolute death look with some yellowish tint mixed in a couple minutes before the winds it.  I can't say that I saw a funnel at any point, but there was some funny looking stuff.  I was outside and not constantly checking my phone for radar at that point, but never strayed more than a few feet from the door in case I'd have to run inside fast.

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Widespread damage throughout the county north of me (Whitley) and the southern part of Ft. Wayne/Allen Co.

FWA rainfall - 2.03" My place 20 miles SW of FWA 0.01"

Also, this is just west of Fort Wayne:

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORTHERN INDIANA
1101 AM EDT TUE JUN 14 2022

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

1018 PM     TSTM WND DMG     3 ESE ARCOLA            41.09N 85.24W
06/13/2022                   ALLEN              IN   NWS EMPLOYEE     

            TRAIN BLOWN OFF THE TRACKS NEAR BASS ROAD. 
            TIME ESTIMATED FROM RADAR.
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54 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

Just a couple other random obs about yesterday.

I noticed a constant gentle thunder for a good 20-30 minutes before it arrived.  It seemed like there were practically no breaks to it.  Anyone else around Chi metro notice that?

The other thing was the sky.  It went from gradually getting darker to an absolute death look with some yellowish tint mixed in a couple minutes before the winds it.  I can't say that I saw a funnel at any point, but there was some funny looking stuff.  I was outside and not constantly checking my phone for radar at that point, but never strayed more than a few feet from the door in case I'd have to run inside fast.

I heard that type of thunder while chasing a hailer in Allegan County, MI on April 7, 2020.  It was after dark and there were almost no breaks in the lighting.  It was a constant strobe.  That was after dark though.

It would be amazing to see video of that Chi metro cell from the air.  If any planes were coming into O'Hare they would be circling waiting for it to move.  Sometimes you see more lighting from a distance, or even from the air, as a thick low updraft base tends to obscure a lot of the intracloud lighting.  It's always really hard to see the full structure of a beast HP cell with a super low base just because it's so big and low to the ground.

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I had to work in the newsroom during the storm, but snapped this photo of the orange-tinted sky as the storm departed during sunset. I was lucky to keep my power. I saw winds around 50-60 mph with some pea-size hail. 

4E3912F3-B7BD-4891-AE70-81F205488DA4.jpeg

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This tidbit from LOT's event page:

 

  • This storm had an impressive depth, with a top over 60,000 ft based on data from multiple radars, and may have been over 65,000 ft to near 70,000 ft. Radar beam widths and heights at such a high elevation become very wide, so it's difficult to say a specific height. No matter what, this storm was in the upper echelon of storm tops for mid-latitude, non-tropical thunderstorms.

 

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36 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

This tidbit from LOT's event page:

 

  • This storm had an impressive depth, with a top over 60,000 ft based on data from multiple radars, and may have been over 65,000 ft to near 70,000 ft. Radar beam widths and heights at such a high elevation become very wide, so it's difficult to say a specific height. No matter what, this storm was in the upper echelon of storm tops for mid-latitude, non-tropical thunderstorms.

 

No wonder it looked like a volcanic eruption plume.  I wonder where the record would be for the tallest cloud.  Tropical cyclones in the strengthening stage often have the highest uniform cloud tops, but there is little or no overshoot.  I have heard that supercells that occur over the eastern Indian subcontinent are exceptionally tall.

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44 minutes ago, frostfern said:

No wonder it looked like a volcanic eruption plume.  I wonder where the record would be for the tallest cloud.  Tropical cyclones in the strengthening stage often have the highest uniform cloud tops, but there is little or no overshoot.  I have heard that supercells that occur over the eastern Indian subcontinent are exceptionally tall.

I have seen soundings from Bangladesh and around that area that almost look like something from another planet.

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Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Chicago IL
620 PM CDT Tue Jun 14 2022 /720 PM EDT Tue Jun 14 2022/

...NWS Damage Survey Results for 6/13/2022 Severe Event...

An NWS damage survey team investigated damage in parts of Cook
and DuPage counties that was caused by a severe thunderstorm that
moved across the Chicago metro during the late afternoon and
evening of Monday, June 13, 2022. It was determined that a brief
EF-0 tornado touched down in unincorporated Schaumburg and moved
into Roselle before lifting. Additionally, it was determined that
strong straight-line winds of 70 mph or greater caused widespread
tree damage in Streamwood and across a large swath of west central
Cook County, with winds as high as 90-95 mph also causing structural
damage in the communities of Bellwood and Westchester.


.Schaumburg-Roselle EF-0 Tornado and Straight-Line Winds...

Rating:                 EF-0
Estimated Peak Wind:    80 mph
Path Length /statute/:  2.2 miles
Path Width /maximum/:   25 yards
Fatalities:             0
Injuries:               0

Start Date:             6/13/2022
Start Time:             6:27 PM CDT
Start Location:         2 S Schaumburg
Start Lat/Lon:          42.0016/-88.0813

End Date:               6/13/2022
End Time:               6:32 PM CDT
End Location:           Roselle
End Lat/Lon:            41.9747/-88.0606

An NWS damage survey determined that a brief tornado touched down
in unincorporated Schaumburg, crossed the Elgin-O`Hare Expressway
into Roselle, and lifted just prior to entering Medinah. Damage
was sporadic along the tornado`s path and was confined to trees.
Just west of the tornado`s track, a wider swath of straight-line wind
damage associated with a rear flank downdraft wrapping around the
tornadic circulation was observed. These winds were estimated to
be as strong as 75 mph and flipped over a small plane at Schaumburg
Regional Airport in addition to causing widespread tree damage on
the far southern side of Schaumburg through much of Roselle.


.Streamwood Straight-Line Winds...

Estimated Peak Winds:   70 to 75 MPH
Fatalities:             0
Injuries:               0

An NWS damage survey determined that widespread tree damage across
Streamwood was caused by strong straight-line winds of up to 75
mph. These winds were associated with a rear flank downdraft that
wrapped around a strong low-level circulation within the parent
supercell thunderstorm.


.West Central Cook County Straight-Line Winds...

Estimated Peak Winds:   90 to 95 MPH
Fatalities:             0
Injuries:               2

Between an NWS damage survey and information provided by local
emergency management agencies, other government officials, and
trained weather spotters, it was determined that structural and
tree damage observed across a large portion of west central Cook
County was caused by a swath of strong straight-line winds. An 84
mph wind gust was observed at O`Hare Airport, and winds as strong
as 95 mph were experienced farther south. Notable structural
damage included roofs getting peeled off of apartment complexes in
both Bellwood and Westchester, and an office building in
Westchester having multiple windows blown out. Two injuries were
reported in the Bellwood apartment complex. Widespread tree damage
was also noted in the suburbs of Bensenville, Bellwood, Maywood,
Westchester, Broadview, La Grange Park, Brookfield, Riverside,
Lyons, Stickney, and other nearby areas.

&&

EF Scale: The Enhanced Fujita Scale classifies tornadoes into the
following categories:

EF0...Weak......65 to 85 mph
EF1...Weak......86 to 110 mph
EF2...Strong....111 to 135 mph
EF3...Strong....136 to 165 mph
EF4...Violent...166 to 200 mph
EF5...Violent...>200 mph

NOTE:
The information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the events and publication in NWS
Storm Data. The NWS greatly appreciates the help from local
spotters, emergency management officials, and fire department
officials who greatly aided in the damage surveys for these
tornadoes.

$$

Baker/Bardou/Doom/Lincoln/Ogorek
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This tidbit from LOT's event page:
 
  • This storm had an impressive depth, with a top over 60,000 ft based on data from multiple radars, and may have been over 65,000 ft to near 70,000 ft. Radar beam widths and heights at such a high elevation become very wide, so it's difficult to say a specific height. No matter what, this storm was in the upper echelon of storm tops for mid-latitude, non-tropical thunderstorms.

 


Must have been insane to see that from a plane. Always love flying around thunderstorms, to see a storm twice as high as you at cruising altitude is a purely intimidating thought. Here’s one from a recent flight over the ocean

1f0d8c48b05f75a3d162543600b0b57f.jpg
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On 6/14/2022 at 7:28 PM, bowtie` said:

95 mph straight line winds are wicked. A hurricane in the Midwest.

Didn't we have one of those in 2020?

Both in terms of an actual warm-core low (Cristobal) moving through, and then the 120-140 MPH gusts with the derecho in August?

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  • 3 weeks later...
6 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

No idea when this was confirmed, but there was another tornado with the Chicago area supercell.  It actually occurred before the other one, in Hoffman Estates.

It was confirmed earlier last week, based on my drone footage. 

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