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April 8, 2024 Eclipse


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Not seeing a general thread on the April 8th Eclipse yet, so I'm starting this one.  We're traveling (flying) to Austin, TX and looking at the current (LONG RANGE) forecast, it could be dicey.  Where are you headed? When do you plan to make the call for where you'll see the eclipse from?

 

Where & When (nasa.gov)

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I'll put this here because I've found these are good filters to get for photography for the eclipse (just not during totality).  You can capture transits and sunspots at any time of course.

 

I found these two solar filters from B&H that cut out UV and IR (note they still warn not to use them for visual use-- only photographic!)

They're somewhat more expensive than the filter I'm getting but still reasonable (75-79 dollars in the 58mm size.) I'd personally go for the NiSi, it looks better to me. The Tiffen isn't on Amazon, the NiSi is, but only in 77/82/95mm size.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1776711-REG/tiffen_58nd54_58mm_neutral_density_filter.html/overview

The 58mm Special 50th Aniversary Edition 18-stop Solar ND Filter from Tiffen is a solid ND filter with a 262,144x filter factor that provides an 18-stop exposure reduction. Its 5.4 density darkens the entire image, allowing you to photograph with a wider aperture or slower shutter speed while reducing the risk of overexposure. This means you can capture more detailed solar images than might be possible under normal conditions. This filter limits IR and UV light, ensuring color-neutral images, and reduces glare with its multi-layer coating.

In honor of B&H's 50th anniversary, Tiffen presents this limited edition run, specially designed to celebrate five decades of creative partnership. This exclusive Special 50th Anniversary Edition embodies the commitment to excellence that B&H stands for. Get your hands on a piece of history with this distinctive edition.

This filter is designed specifically for photography applications. This filter is not suitable for direct solar viewing with the naked eye, including with optical viewfinders.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1776573-REG/nisi_nir_nd5_0_58_solar_filter_pro_nano.html/overview?ap=y&ap=y&smp=y&smp=y&lsft=BI%3A6879&gad_source=1&gclid=CjwKCAjwh4-wBhB3EiwAeJsppMYxxflB3KZqA-5lyK1WULFWuPvDpeJmF5BJzDdF2cTuBP1JOvY8lRoCjyMQAvD_BwE

This 58mm Solar Filter Pro Nano UV/IR Cut ND100000 Filter from NiSi is an essential tool for any photographer looking to capture stunning solar images. This high-quality filter is made from optical glass and is designed to provide a 16.5-stop light reduction, making it possible to capture detailed images of the sun without overexposing them. The filter also cuts UV and IR light, ensuring the most color-neutral result. The Nano coating on the filter also helps to reduce reflections and glare, improving the overall image quality.

The NiSi Solar Filter Pro Nano UV/IR Cut ND100000 is essential for capturing stunning solar images that will stand out from the crowd. With its high-quality construction, advanced features, and ease of use, this filter is a must-have for any photographer looking to take their solar photography to the next level.

This filter is designed specifically for photography applications. This filter is not suitable for direct solar viewing with the naked eye, including with optical viewfinders.

Precautions and Warnings

  • This filter is not appropriate for direct solar observation with the naked eye, and should exclusively be used for photographic purposes.
  • Check the solar filter for damage before each use by holding it up to a bright light (not the sun). Secure the filter properly by screwing it fully onto the lens.
  • The NiSi Solar Filter is not suitable eye protection for extended view of sun or solar eclipses. Do not look directly or indirectly into the sun without appropriate eye protection. The Solar Filter should be installed in front of the camera lens or telescope before trying to align it with the sun. Point the camera away from the sun when attaching and removing the solar filter.
  • Do not use an optical viewfinder when aligning your camera or telescope with the sun. It is recommended to use the live view feature of the camera for aligning it with the sun and for viewing.
  • Do not leave a camera unattended where a child or inexperienced adult could point it at the sun without the filter adequately attached.
  • The filter may absorb solar energy and get hot during use. Use extra care when removing it.

https://www.amazon.com/NiSi-ND100000-Optical-Lightweight-Transport/dp/B0C4BYXBGZ/ref=sr_1_5?dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.HtkYMfB0ZcCTA2LLKodj91MA_JajzmSQ8NgrwKpcgOKcDyrfAJP92pqPSGqf0b6Ol8GRHDQ7rtW-_qXKb1cDo5Dt4Q4IDhX9Qmu4MjOmE0Wnr12iTJB0zvRDFtkHBeFz3z40Kgu2QX2GnqlrLADhqT0QBo7Qss3IB2jCOsJC1IocL0TWwMstwq0X6GkFtVB6aKvSlJ_pyhGAgChNFWt8wzT35GmsCwuvfLiw71Jz3aw.B8UkcqBatf90_Di4XithmiLi-_DZFjQNE1KdiHt5j6w&dib_tag=se&keywords=nisi%2Bfilters&qid=1711556322&sr=8-5&th=1

https://www.amazon.com/NiSi-ND100000-Optical-Lightweight-Transport/dp/B0C4BYXBGZ/ref=sr_1_5?dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.HtkYMfB0ZcCTA2LLKodj91MA_JajzmSQ8NgrwKpcgOKcDyrfAJP92pqPSGqf0b6Ol8GRHDQ7rtW-_qXKb1cDo5Dt4Q4IDhX9Qmu4MjOmE0Wnr12iTJB0zvRDFtkHBeFz3z40Kgu2QX2GnqlrLADhqT0QBo7Qss3IB2jCOsJC1IocL0TWwMstwq0X6GkFtVB6aKvSlJ_pyhGAgChNFWt8wzT35GmsCwuvfLiw71Jz3aw.B8UkcqBatf90_Di4XithmiLi-_DZFjQNE1KdiHt5j6w&dib_tag=se&keywords=nisi%2Bfilters&qid=1711556322&sr=8-5&th=1

About this item

  • SIZING: Designed with a standard filter thread. Confirm your lens size by locating the "ø" symbol.
  • NEUTRAL DENSITY: The 5.0 density reduces the amount of light entering the camera by 16.6 stops.
  • COLOR-NEUTRAL: Distortion protection from both ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) light spectrum.
  • NANO COATING: Reduces unwanted reflections, waterproof, dust-proof, and scratch-resistant.
  • HIGH QUALITY MATERIALS: Premium camera lens optical glass housed in a slim, knurled aluminum frame.

https://www.amazon.com/NiSi-ND5-0-Bundle-Low-Profile-Photography/dp/B0CTD75T9L

Brand NiSi Material Optical Glass Photo Filter Thread Size 82 Millimeters Coating Description Nano Coating Photo Filter Effect Type Neutral Density Water Resistance Level Waterproof Product Dimensions 3.23"L x 3.23"W Photo Filter Size 82 Millimeters
About this item

  • With a 16.6-stop light reduction, this filter is perfect for capturing stunning details without overexposing your images
  • The filter is designed to cut UV and IR light, ensuring the most color-neutral result when shooting in bright conditions
  • The Nano coating helps to reduce reflections and glare, improving the overall quality of your images
  • Allow the ND100000 filter to attach to lenses with a filter thread of 77mm (using the Step Up Ring) or directly to an 82mm filter thread.
  • Ultra-thin aluminum step-up ring allows for use on 77mm lenses and keeps the filter close to your lens to avoid vignetting.
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I've been following the weather closer the last week. I've got a reservation in Medina, NY area from the 6th leaving back for home on the 10th. Going to overnight in Lancaster, Pa on the way up from North Carolina. Waiting a day to start out for home after the eclipse. Learned my lesson in 2017 when traffic from Greenville, SC was downright atrocious. It took us around 12 hours to make a 3½ hour trip due to a jack-knifed semi. My wife's nerves were shot, mine not much better. Tried to find a hotel to escape the Interstate and overnight in but they were all booked. Wound up going all of the way home. Medina does not appear likely to be in a congested area as far as I can tell as it appears to be relatively rural. I'll feel somewhat comfortable doing a short chase if necessary. Don't want to get in crowds as wife has an autoimmune disease. If it looks like a front will come thru a few days before and wash out the eclipse I can cancel and get my reservation deposit back. Our reservation is about dead center in the track, so we won't have to travel anywhere if the weather cooperates. I'm using the following link to keep up with forecasts from one link.

https://eclipsophile.com/eclipse-day-weather/

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I plan on traveling to northeast Ohio for the eclipse as long as rain isn’t in the forecast for that day. I have a family member who lives in a Cleveland suburb who’s letting me stay at her place if I want to. Really hoping for clear skies - I’ll even settle for partly cloudy.

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4 hours ago, eyewall said:

Still not looking great now for much of the path:
image.thumb.png.545e1b1762f3015fcbfdfedad52870e3.png

wow this is absolutely amazing! where do you find maps with so much detail? the media never shows a map like this.

what do you think of Syracuse as a place to go to? Are those holes in the clouds up there or should we not look at such fine details this far out lol

 

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4 hours ago, eyewall said:

Still not looking great now for much of the path:
image.thumb.png.545e1b1762f3015fcbfdfedad52870e3.png

this map is so confusing, especially with that annoying ad at the bottom that hides the color key.  So white actually means clear skies? It should be the reverse-- we normally associate white with clouds!  I thought Texas was in the clear and New York was mostly cloudy, but it looks like the opposite is true.

 

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1 minute ago, LibertyBell said:

this map is so confusing, especially with that annoying ad at the bottom that hides the color key.  So white actually means clear skies? It should be the reverse-- we normally associate white with clouds!  I thought Texas was in the clear and New York was mostly cloudy, but it looks like the opposite is true.

 

As of today the northeast is looking like the best bet for clear skies, but we have quite a ways to go with this forecast.

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1 minute ago, Cat Lady said:

As of today the northeast is looking like the best bet for clear skies, but we have quite a ways to go with this forecast.

I really wish they made these maps more intuitive and didn't have those ads hiding the color key.

One associates blue with clear skies and white with cloudy skies-- not the reverse!

 

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My target is anywhere on that red path, of course the closer the better. Midwest is closest to me. Mid-South is a near second. TX and OH are my next tier of back-up plans; We have motels or places to stay to cover North Texas to Ohio. Wil cancel what's not needed according to their canx policies. 

If at about 5 days out South Texas or the Northeast US still looks like the only game in town, activate panic button. It could be done, but what a far cry from the Easy Button in 2017 which was clear 45 minutes up the road. About 5 minutes after 2017 we decided we're traveling for 2024.

Too early to pin down target areas. Broad pattern still looks trough West ridge East, which is sub-optimal for much of the path. In about a week, we'll know if  how we can work around it. We don't want something like April 1-2 positive tilt with the fronts draped along and parallel to the path. Neutral or negative tilt could be managed if the main rain band it perpendicular to the eclipse path. Just find a better spot on the path. Still ten days out; so, there is as good a chance the forecast improves as otherwise.

Traffic will be worst departing. Big picnic and drinks. I'm not worried going to, but we will be there early. I prefer ol' fashioned eclipse shadow boxes to the glasses. Image in the glasses is so flat, I feel glasses don't add much value over the box. Maybe glasses for Bailey's Beads. No photography for us again, except killing time in the partial phases. I want to remember going with family and friends, but I'm not going to waste Totality fumbling with equipment. 

From about 5 minutes before Totality it's all about experiencing it and soaking up every last detail into long-term memory. Cicadas at midday. Birds freaking. Shadow bands on white surface. Then that shadow in the sky. People describe it as eerie, but I prefer majestic. Dark curtain rushing toward is the sign that it is almost time. It's so exciting but at the same time we went silent in awe. The only man-made sound I want to hear during Totality is my eclipse timer. Nice to know how long you got so you don't go blind, haha!

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10 hours ago, LibertyBell said:

this map is so confusing, especially with that annoying ad at the bottom that hides the color key.  So white actually means clear skies? It should be the reverse-- we normally associate white with clouds!  I thought Texas was in the clear and New York was mostly cloudy, but it looks like the opposite is true.

 

Don't trust these cloud cover maps too much......gonna have to wait until middle of next week to really get a feel for where we stand......the cloud cover maps are typically way overdone......

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12 hours ago, nrgjeff said:

My target is anywhere on that red path, of course the closer the better. Midwest is closest to me. Mid-South is a near second. TX and OH are my next tier of back-up plans; We have motels or places to stay to cover North Texas to Ohio. Wil cancel what's not needed according to their canx policies. 

If at about 5 days out South Texas or the Northeast US still looks like the only game in town, activate panic button. It could be done, but what a far cry from the Easy Button in 2017 which was clear 45 minutes up the road. About 5 minutes after 2017 we decided we're traveling for 2024.

Too early to pin down target areas. Broad pattern still looks trough West ridge East, which is sub-optimal for much of the path. In about a week, we'll know if  how we can work around it. We don't want something like April 1-2 positive tilt with the fronts draped along and parallel to the path. Neutral or negative tilt could be managed if the main rain band it perpendicular to the eclipse path. Just find a better spot on the path. Still ten days out; so, there is as good a chance the forecast improves as otherwise.

Traffic will be worst departing. Big picnic and drinks. I'm not worried going to, but we will be there early. I prefer ol' fashioned eclipse shadow boxes to the glasses. Image in the glasses is so flat, I feel glasses don't add much value over the box. Maybe glasses for Bailey's Beads. No photography for us again, except killing time in the partial phases. I want to remember going with family and friends, but I'm not going to waste Totality fumbling with equipment. 

From about 5 minutes before Totality it's all about experiencing it and soaking up every last detail into long-term memory. Cicadas at midday. Birds freaking. Shadow bands on white surface. Then that shadow in the sky. People describe it as eerie, but I prefer majestic. Dark curtain rushing toward is the sign that it is almost time. It's so exciting but at the same time we went silent in awe. The only man-made sound I want to hear during Totality is my eclipse timer. Nice to know how long you got so you don't go blind, haha!

Man, your description really makes me wish eclipses happened more often.  I like this idea by the ESA of artificially creating eclipses using satellites they will be launching later this year.  I know nature is always best, but if humans can make them happen more often using satellites, it should be done.  Such an awe inspiring experience!

 

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4 hours ago, ice1972 said:

Don't trust these cloud cover maps too much......gonna have to wait until middle of next week to really get a feel for where we stand......the cloud cover maps are typically way overdone......

Yea, this time of year is the hardest to predict.  It's like trying to predict where a rain/snow line will be lol.

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Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but it is my understanding that the global models like GFS and ECMWF do not simulate eclipses so they will have a tendency to overestimate shortwave driven clouds.

However, the HRRR has been programmed from its inception to simulate eclipses so we should be able to get a feel for the cloud thinning effect starting on April 6th. Clouds are one of the least skillful forecast parameters already and we've seen problems with HRRR's PBL physics in the past so its wise to keep a discerning mindset regardless.

Speaking of the cloud thinning effect...here is a very recent study both from an observational and modeling perspective regarding the topic. [Trees et al. 2024]

Here is the HRRR simulation from the 2017 eclipse. Notice the shortwave driven clouds build just before onset of the eclipse and then wane rapidly as totality approaches. Then after totality passes shortwave driven clouds explode aggressively as the surface warming is reinstated. The bootheel of Missouri is an example of this. I was down there in 2017 and can corroborate the fact that there was a significant reduction in clouds in the 30 minutes leading up to totality.

 

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2 hours ago, Ed, snow and hurricane fan said:

If I had money to travel, I'd lean Lake Erie-ish.    Far too early, of course.  PW may not say much about high clouds, but the best thing I can think of for now.  North Texas might have morning low clouds which usually burns off by 18Z.

gfs-ens_mslp_pwata_us_38_FarTooEarly.png

I noticed the Euro has much more cloudiness along the path of totality including up here in the northeast.

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Deterministic models tend to vastly overestimate cloud cover in the long range. We won't truly have an idea what the situation will be until we start to get into hi-resolution model territory. I would not be concerned on the southern edge of the path yet, nor would I be spiking the football in New England or near the Lakes. There are lots of ways that this could still go wrong on the mesoscale.

I say this as someone flying to San Antonio, who is prepared to reroute if need be. 

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2 hours ago, Winter Wizard said:

Deterministic models tend to vastly overestimate cloud cover in the long range. We won't truly have an idea what the situation will be until we start to get into hi-resolution model territory. I would not be concerned on the southern edge of the path yet, nor would I be spiking the football in New England or near the Lakes. There are lots of ways that this could still go wrong on the mesoscale.

I say this as someone flying to San Antonio, who is prepared to reroute if need be. 

What is your reroute plan if you needed to? We are flying into Dallas and landing at 9:00ish that morning and getting a rental car….we’d have about 3 hours to get rental and go to a target but that’s only gonna buy us like 100 miles radius tops, which if there’s significant clouds won’t work probably…..I’m getting nervous for sure….we spent way too much dough on the flight and it’s part of a larger vacation where we leave Dallas that night to Reno for snowboard vacation in Tahoe….the logistics are a nightmare…..

Were you prepared to fly elsewhere or get in earlier and drive further?

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49 minutes ago, ice1972 said:

What is your reroute plan if you needed to? We are flying into Dallas and landing at 9:00ish that morning and getting a rental car….we’d have about 3 hours to get rental and go to a target but that’s only gonna buy us like 100 miles radius tops, which if there’s significant clouds won’t work probably…..I’m getting nervous for sure….we spent way too much dough on the flight and it’s part of a larger vacation where we leave Dallas that night to Reno for snowboard vacation in Tahoe….the logistics are a nightmare…..

Were you prepared to fly elsewhere or get in earlier and drive further?

So the plan is to fly into San Antonio on Thursday and leave Tuesday - I've had that flight and hotel booked for months. If we get rerouted, I think the most likely plan would be to spend Sunday driving toward AR. If it turns out we need to be in MO/IL, may actually end up leaving Saturday or just get up at the crack of dawn and push as far as we can. Ideally, if we have to move, it would be within reasonable distance of STL or MEM, so I'd fly from there to San Antonio Tuesday evening, then push my flight back to Wednesday evening. 

The absolute last resort would be to fly into New England and head north but logistically that's very difficult for our group, who's coming from all over the US. 

Any chance you could get in earlier?

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35 minutes ago, Winter Wizard said:

So the plan is to fly into San Antonio on Thursday and leave Tuesday - I've had that flight and hotel booked for months. If we get rerouted, I think the most likely plan would be to spend Sunday driving toward AR. If it turns out we need to be in MO/IL, may actually end up leaving Saturday or just get up at the crack of dawn and push as far as we can. Ideally, if we have to move, it would be within reasonable distance of STL or MEM, so I'd fly from there to San Antonio Tuesday evening, then push my flight back to Wednesday evening. 

The absolute last resort would be to fly into New England and head north but logistically that's very difficult for our group, who's coming from all over the US. 

Any chance you could get in earlier?

Initially flying in Monday morning was the only option but our plans changed and now the change of flights would be way too expensive…..the logistics of trying to chase this thing and get to Reno later are a lot….I’ll be regrouping tomorrow….man

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So I take it these eclipses occur in 30 year cycles?

This is my first solar eclipse memory -- from May 10, 1994.

Does this eclipse path look familiar to anyone?

 

It was supposed to be raining and overcast all day but it stopped raining early and it stayed overcast, but because of the movement of the clouds, the clouds thinned out a little from time to time and it happened just in time for peak eclipse!

Does this eclipse path for May 10, 1994 look familiar to you? And just like I remembered it, it reached peak eclipse here just after 1 PM (1:35 PM to be exact.) Looks like that one was 89% here just like this one will be (with that one you had to travel north to Albany to see annularity and for this one it's Syracuse to see totality.) Is there a 30 year cycle for eclipses?

It's amazing how wide a range this annular had, from Mexico to Texas to New York all the way across the Atlantic to Morocco and to Algeria!

https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/1994-may-10

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this was back in May 1994 and here in New York the sun was about 90% covered and I was able to look at it through 10x50 binoculars without hurting my eyes because the cloud cover was rather dense at 1:30 in the afternoon and the sun was just barely visible through them as a small ring around a dark moon. I'll never forget that experience! I believe that was an annular eclipse but the annularity happened north of here.

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