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jaxjagman

Tn Valley Severe Weather 2018-19

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I'll post this here since flooding is severe.There really looks like some parts of the Valley will break records for the most rain fall in the month of Feb.Nashville's record was set in 1989 with 10.12".So far Nashville has 4.37".Not sure about the other areas if i get time i will explore more.Memphis  broke the record last year with over 11" for Feb  that was set back in 1948

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Really starting to like down the road for some potential severe risk.Synoptic pattern looking at the Upper plains has shown some severe outbreaks in the SE.The NMME and even the RRWT shows this pattern into the spring time.The NMME and RRWT warm temps into April off the Japan coast down into maybe north of the Sea of the  Philippines.This would set up a more of a east coast  ridge if it were to teleconnect right.This isn't a forecast,just my presumption at this point.

 

http://www.shawnmilrad.com/severe/

NMME_ensemble_tmp2m_lead2 png  800×618  (1).png

RRWT   Consonant Chaos.png

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12Z GFS wants to keep western troughing in place pretty much throughout the period, but without ever developing much appreciable instability inland. I know it has a penchant for lowballing CAPE, especially at longer ranges, but so far it has been generally right about the last few systems (including those coming this week) being low-end to non-events while "King" Euro at times had a more ominous look.

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After another round of duds in the coming week (per SPC Day 4-8), recent GFS runs have been somewhat consistent in bringing greater CAPE values into the mid-South/TN Valley beneath strong 500mb southwesterly flow around the end of the month. Of course that is still in fantasyland so we shall see.

 

*LOL, totally different look for that timeframe on the 6Z run.

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Duds are not too discouraging this early in the season. Same week in March and I'm going off, lol!

That said, I will be ready for day-of decisions if I'm not hammered at work. Next weekend would be convenient.

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Early season i agree.Some chance of thunderstorms next week as a WF lifts into the lower OV putting the Valley in the warm sector,then a CF comes through.CIPS and even the dashboard hints at thunderstorms.Wouldn't mind tho seeing a good light show at night time:lightning:

CIPS Extended Analog Guidance.png

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Definitely increasing potential somewhere in the LA/AR and points east area for organized severe weather. Looking like a robust wave will interact with instability as significant cyclogenesis takes place. Shall keep an eye out on this one. 

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Storm Prediction Center introduces 15% for Saturday. Yeah after about 4-5 waves tugging on Gulf Moisture, it could indeed be far enough north. Best dynamics may go over Midwest, but enough southern stream energy lingers over Dixie if the moisture is here.

Looking ahead deeper into March, ECMWF weeklies (verbatim) tee up severe weather. Trough returns to the West with SER. We'll see..

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For the time being the more severe into March would be more mainly into the S/Plains,doesn't mean we can't get any severe,it's with what the CFS is showing right now

cfs_ProbSvr14_3 6 png  800×618 .png

 

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 Day 4-8 Convective Outlook  
   NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
   0357 AM CST Tue Feb 19 2019

   Valid 221200Z - 271200Z

   ...DISCUSSION...
   Medium-range models suggest that blocking will become more prominent
   at a higher latitude of the northeastern Pacific this coming weekend
   through early next week.  As this occurs, split downstream
   westerlies will generally converge inland of the Pacific coast, with
   the southern mid-latitude and subtropical westerlies generally
   decreasing in amplitude across the southern tier of the United
   States.  

   Prior to this transition, at least one more vigorous short wave
   impulse is forecast to emerge from persistent larger-scale western
   U.S. troughing late this week, as a significant upstream
   perturbation digs into the U.S. Pacific Northwest.  Latest model
   output remains similar to prior runs indicating that the lead
   impulse will support strong cyclogenesis to the lee of the Rockies,
   likely from the Texas/Oklahoma Panhandle vicinity through the Great
   Lakes on Saturday.  It still appears probable that there will be
   sufficient boundary layer moisture return across the evolving warm
   sector to contribute to weak to modest destabilization in the
   presence of intensifying wind fields (including 50-70+ kt in the
   850-500 mb layer), from portions of the lower southern Plains and
   Ozark Plateau through portions of the lower Mississippi and Ohio
   Valleys.  Forcing for ascent may support the evolution of a
   mesoscale convective system capable of producing damaging wind
   gusts.  This could be preceded by discrete supercell development and
   an associated risk for tornadoes.

   Although more uncertain, it is possible that severe weather
   potential could continue eastward into portions of the Allegheny and
   Cumberland Plateaus by late Saturday night.  Uncertainty concerning
   this potential increases further for Sunday, eastward and
   southeastward across the Mid Atlantic and Southeast.

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Day 4-8 Convective Outlook  
   NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
   0358 AM CST Wed Feb 20 2019

   Valid 231200Z - 281200Z

   ...DISCUSSION...
   Medium-range model output continues to indicate strong cyclogenesis
   will commence across the southern Plains by 12Z Saturday, before
   continuing northeastward through the Great Lakes region by 12Z
   Sunday. Guidance indicates that the rapid evolution of a broad and
   deep cyclone is likely, aided by a vigorous short wave impulse
   emerging from the Southwest.  It appears that this will be
   accompanied by an intensifying cyclonic mid-level jet, including in
   excess of 100 kt at 500 mb by midday Saturday across the southern
   Plains Red River Valley, and 50-80+ kt south/southwesterly 850-700
   mb flow across the destabilizing warm sector.  This environment may
   become conducive to the evolution of a significant organized
   mesoscale convective system, potentially accompanied by considerable
   damaging wind gusts.

   Highest severe probabilities appear focused in a swath across parts
   of the Ozark Plateau and lower Mississippi Valley into the Tennessee
   and lower Ohio Valleys.  A warm front may initially be located along
   a corridor near or just south of the Ohio River, west southwestward
   into northwestern Arkansas, near the northern periphery of the
   currently depicted 15 percent severe probabilities.  While the
   influence of current snow and ice cover near and northwest of this
   region remains uncertain, this boundary may ultimately remain the
   focus for the track of the northern flank of an evolving squall
   line.  However, based on the track of the low, aided by strong
   dynamic forcing, destabilization supportive of  severe thunderstorm
   potential could develop northward into southern portions of the
   Great Lakes region Saturday night.

   The southern edge of the 15 percent probabilities is based on the
   model consensus of the southern periphery of the deeper surface
   cyclone.  The southern flank of an evolving squall line may extend
   this far south, where boundary-layer moistening and destabilization 
   will likely be most favorable.  This environment may also support
   discrete supercell development in advance of the squall line.  In
   addition to the risk for damaging convective gusts, there appears
   potential for tornadoes, including some strong.

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 Day 3 Convective Outlook  
   NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
   0222 AM CST Thu Feb 21 2019

   Valid 231200Z - 241200Z

   ...THERE IS AN ENHANCED RISK OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS SATURDAY
   THROUGH SATURDAY EVENING ACROSS PARTS OF CENTRAL/EASTERN
   ARKANSAS...THE MISSOURI BOOTHEEL...WESTERN/CENTRAL
   KENTUCKY...WESTERN/MIDDLE TENNESSEE...NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI AND
   NORTHWESTERN ALABAMA...

   ...SUMMARY...
   An organized cluster of severe thunderstorms may evolve Saturday in 
   a corridor across the Ozark Plateau through the lower Ohio Valley,
   with additional severe storms possible across the lower Mississippi
   into Tennessee Valleys.  Considerable wind damage may accompany
   these storms along with the risk for tornadoes, some of which could
   be strong.

   ...Discussion...
   In phase with the subtropical westerlies, a vigorous short wave
   impulse of mid-latitude Pacific origins is forecast to accelerate
   northeast of the southern Plains through the Great Lakes region
   during this period.  Strong cyclogenesis may already be underway by
   12Z Saturday near the Texas/Oklahoma Panhandle vicinity, and models
   continue to indicate that the rapid evolution of a broad and deep
   cyclone will proceed northeastward into the Great Lakes region by
   the end of the period.

   This likely will include the intensification of a cyclonic mid-level
   jet, including speeds in excess of 100 kt at 500 mb, across the
   southern Plains Red River Valley, through the middle Mississippi and
   Ohio Valleys.  Across the evolving warm sector, models indicate that
   south/southwesterly winds will strengthen to 50-70+ kt through the
   850-700 mb layer.

   Although the warm frontal zone probably will surge north of the Ohio
   River, and into/through the lower Great Lakes region by late
   Saturday evening, an initial position roughly along the Ohio River
   west-southwestward into the Ozark Plateau may provide the main focus
   for severe thunderstorm potential.  Early period convection,
   associated with weak elevated destabilization above the front, may
   inhibit, or at least slow, boundary-layer destabilization to the
   north, while leaving a remnant surface boundary.

   In association with the onset of stronger surface pressure falls,
   surface dew points are expected to increase through the lower/mid
   60s along and south of this boundary.  Coupled with strengthening
   large-scale ascent, this is expected to contribute at least weak
   boundary-layer destabilization supportive of an evolving organized
   mesoscale convective system.  CAPE on the order of 500+ J/kg appears
   possible.  Given the strength of the environmental wind fields (and
   shear) within the convective layer, the convective system may be
   accompanied by considerable potential for strong and damaging wind
   gusts.

   It appears that this may initiate over parts of central and eastern
   Arkansas by midday, before progressing east-northeastward through
   the lower Ohio Valley by Saturday evening.  A few tornadoes, some
   strong, are also possible, particularly with discrete supercells
   which may form near/just ahead of mainly the southern flank of the
   evolving system.

   More discrete storms, including supercells, may eventually develop
   as far south as the lower Mississippi Valley through portions of the
   southern Appalachians by late Saturday night.

Storm Prediction Center Feb 21  2019 0830 UTC Day 3 Severe Thunderstorm Outlook.png

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Even without tornadoes if we get  storms with  sig winds practically anywhere in the the Valley it could look like a potential war zone.

 

Excessive Rainfall Discussion
NWS Weather Prediction Center College Park MD
324 AM EST Thu Feb 21 2019
 
Day 2
Valid 12Z Fri Feb 22 2019 - 12Z Sat Feb 23 2019 

...THERE IS A MODERATE RISK OF EXCESSIVE RAINFALL OVER PARTS OF 
THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY TO THE TENNESSEE VALLEY DUE TO 
ANTECDANT CONDITIONS PLUS ADDITIONAL RAINFALL...

...Southern U.S. to parts of the Southeast U.S. and southern 
Appalachians...
Yet another impulse in the mid levels moving northward from the 
Gulf of Mexico will move across portions of Mississippi and 
Louisiana at the start of the Day 2 period...or Friday 
morning...and then take a more easterly track by the time is 
reaches the southern portion of the Appalachians.  Heaviest 
rainfall from the system looks in the Tennessee Valey and portions 
of adjacent states.  

Model QPF values were generally in the 2 to 3 inch range with a 
couple isolated amounts in excess of 4 inches. This is consistent 
with some instability developing in response to deepening 
moisture, low level flow on the order of 25 kts to 35 kts that 
accelerates to between 30 kts and 45 kts as well as weakly 
channeled mid level vorticity.  

The synoptic set up and the QPF amounts would not garner much 
attention if the conditions had been dry...but the area has had 
multiple rounds of moderate to heavy rainfall over the past 5 days 
or so and Flash Flood Guidance values have been supressed 
accordingly.  

Maximum rainfall on Day 2 is expected to be in the Tennessee 
Valley and Southern States...but flash flooding is a concern in 
the southern portion of the Appalachians.  Rain will be falling in 
complex terrain and in areas of snow-cover...making the area more 
vulnerable to flash flooding despite the fact that heaviest 
rainfall stays to the west.

Based on coordination/collaboration with affected offices, have 
introduced a Moderate Risk of Excessive Rainfall over portions o

cfs_ProbSvr14_3 6 png  800×618 .png

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4 minutes ago, jaxjagman said:

Even without tornadoes if we get  storms with  sig winds practically anywhere in the the Valley it could look like a potential war zone.

 

Excessive Rainfall Discussion
NWS Weather Prediction Center College Park MD
324 AM EST Thu Feb 21 2019
 
Day 2
Valid 12Z Fri Feb 22 2019 - 12Z Sat Feb 23 2019 

...THERE IS A MODERATE RISK OF EXCESSIVE RAINFALL OVER PARTS OF 
THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY TO THE TENNESSEE VALLEY DUE TO 
ANTECDANT CONDITIONS PLUS ADDITIONAL RAINFALL...

...Southern U.S. to parts of the Southeast U.S. and southern 
Appalachians...
Yet another impulse in the mid levels moving northward from the 
Gulf of Mexico will move across portions of Mississippi and 
Louisiana at the start of the Day 2 period...or Friday 
morning...and then take a more easterly track by the time is 
reaches the southern portion of the Appalachians.  Heaviest 
rainfall from the system looks in the Tennessee Valey and portions 
of adjacent states.  

Model QPF values were generally in the 2 to 3 inch range with a 
couple isolated amounts in excess of 4 inches. This is consistent 
with some instability developing in response to deepening 
moisture, low level flow on the order of 25 kts to 35 kts that 
accelerates to between 30 kts and 45 kts as well as weakly 
channeled mid level vorticity.  

The synoptic set up and the QPF amounts would not garner much 
attention if the conditions had been dry...but the area has had 
multiple rounds of moderate to heavy rainfall over the past 5 days 
or so and Flash Flood Guidance values have been supressed 
accordingly.  

Maximum rainfall on Day 2 is expected to be in the Tennessee 
Valley and Southern States...but flash flooding is a concern in 
the southern portion of the Appalachians.  Rain will be falling in 
complex terrain and in areas of snow-cover...making the area more 
vulnerable to flash flooding despite the fact that heaviest 
rainfall stays to the west.

Based on coordination/collaboration with affected offices, have 
introduced a Moderate Risk of Excessive Rainfall over portions o

cfs_ProbSvr14_3 6 png  800×618 .png

Yea, won't take much blow allot timber down 

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Saturday severe risk has held up with data today. Just a look at the surface chart and visible satellite shows the Gulf air boundary is onshore and moving north. It will stall in the Deep South Friday as heavy rain pounds the Tennessee Valley. Then it is forecast to lift north Saturday, but probably become a little diffuse as the synoptic warm front lifts to the Ohio Valley. 

A couple days ago, I saw some veer-back-veer VBV on upper air forecasts around 700 mb. Most of the VBV is gone now. Forecast hodographs have that big but gentle curve up through 200 mb. Believe the presence of a more defined southern short-wave has created the more textbook upper air charts. Check of forecast helicity index confirms the drill down (or up) through the forecast charts.

Instability remains a question. Severe weather really does not. This forced set-up will at least have a lot of straight line winds. Saturday morning MCS is generally forecast to lift northeast. However it could continue straight east and contaminate the warm sector. MCS lifting out and leaving behind an outflow boundary would be more favorable for tornadoes, iff enough breaks of sun can destabilize things. 

Looks like a good one to track from home. Could be high water spots on roads. Storm motion will be fast. Visibility may be low with tight T/Td spreads. Terrain is hit and miss. Couple huge college basketball games are on Saturday. While wind shear parameters are solid, it may just be forced winds without more instability. Of course the door is open for a greater tornado threat though.

Separately, those Excessive Rainfall charts might be of interest in the Event thread for heavy rain and flooding. No worries about today, but I bet they stay robust next update.

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National Weather Service Nashville TN
300 PM CST Thu Feb 21 2019

...Potentially Life-Threatening Flash Flooding Possible...

.DISCUSSION...

While sun was seen by many this morning north of I-40, showers have
already started to stream into Middle TN this afternoon. This isn`t
great news because an earlier arrival of the rains means even more
we don`t need. Flood Advisories have already started flowing out in
our far southern counties and for this reason, we`re going to move
up the start time of the Flash Flood Watch with the issuance of this
afternoon`s forecast package.

This isn`t a forecast discussion I write lightly. After yesterday`s
widespread flooding across all of Middle TN, even with the 18 hour
break in rainfall, the addition of even another 1 to 1.5 inches is
going to create some major issues.  The problem is, we`re now
forecasting 1 to 3 inches of rain just through tomorrow afternoon
and a total of 3 to 5 inches from tonight through Saturday night.
The highest amounts are currently thought to fall across southwest
portions of Middle TN, basically west of I-24 and south of I-40.
While there were already swift water rescues yesterday, this amount
of rainfall is likely to cause more of the same and probably even
cause some people to be thinking about a plan to evacuate.  This
needs to be your focus prior tonight.  If you live near a stream or
a creek or a river that you know floods easily, you need to have a
plan in place to evacuate and get to higher ground in the event
waters begin to rise as this has the makings of a life-threatening
situation. The main time of concern begins early tomorrow morning,
runs right through most of the day tomorrow and probably won`t let
up much, if at all, tomorrow night.

While there is a severe weather threat Saturday evening across the
mid-state, the focus right now needs to be the extreme amount of
rainfall we`re expecting.  Please don`t take this lightly.  Have a
plan in place now so you can evacuate to higher ground quickly, if
need be.

Now, for the severe weather threat.  Models continue to show an
intense system developing upstream from the TN River valley Saturday
morning.  This system will increase winds fields to the point where
we`re looking at significant low-level helicities (on the order
of 500 0-1 km) by Saturday evening. The question will be the
amount of instability that can be realized. A strong low-level jet
will try to strengthen the warm air advection ahead of what is
likely to be at least a broken, if not solid, line of convection
for Saturday evening. Here`s the major issue with this: even if we
only get strong wind gusts out of this system (40-50 mph), with
as wet as the ground already is, trees are going to fall very
easily. This is something folks need to keep in mind as we go into
Saturday evening. The main concern right now is damaging straight
line winds, but with the low-level helicities expected, I
wouldn`t be surprised to see rotation in many of these storms.
Again, the flash flooding threat is the main concern in the next
24-36 hours, but then we need to watch this closely.

With all of that said, models are hinting at the possibility of at
least 3 days of dry weather after Saturday night.  This will be a
welcomed change after the next couple of days.

&&

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 Day 2 Convective Outlook  
   NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
   1121 AM CST Fri Feb 22 2019

   Valid 231200Z - 241200Z

   ...THERE IS AN ENHANCED RISK OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS FROM A PORTION
   OF THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY INTO THE TENNESSEE VALLEY...

   ...SUMMARY...
   Scattered severe storms are expected Saturday from a portion of the
   lower Mississippi and Tennessee Valleys and possibly into western
   and central Kentucky.  Damaging wind and tornadoes are the main
   threats, but hail is also possible.

   ...Synopsis...

   By 12Z Saturday, lee cyclogenesis will be well underway over the
   southern High Plains in association with a potent southern-stream
   shortwave trough now located over AZ. This feature will continue
   into the southern and central Plains and then northeastward into the
   middle MS Valley tomorrow. By later Saturday afternoon the cyclone
   will be located over MO with a cold front trailing southward through
   AR and LA. A warm front should extend southeastward from the low
   through western KY into middle TN and GA. The surface low will
   occlude over the Great Lakes while the trailing front reaches the
   central and southern Appalachians by the end of the period. 
    
   ...Lower Mississippi through Tennessee Valley regions...

   As of mid day a quasi-stationary front extends from the northwest
   Gulf through southern portions of the Gulf Coast states. Rich
   low-level moisture with upper 60s to near 70 F dewpoints resides
   south of this front. Farther north a rain-cooled boundary stretches
   from northeast TX through northern portions of MS, AL and GA. A
   broad southerly low-level jet will increase tonight over the lower
   MS Valley within the gradient zone between retreating high pressure
   and the developing lee cyclone. This will promote northward advance
   of the warm front that will eventually merge with the rain-cooled
   boundary farther north. This consolidated boundary should reach
   central AR and western TN later Saturday morning, possibly
   continuing as far north as western KY during the afternoon. Primary
   uncertainty this forecast is degree and northward extent of boundary
   layer destabilization, especially through west and central KY. Most
   recent model runs including the CAMs suggest that much of KY will be
   affected by areas of widespread rain and clouds within zone of
   isentropic ascent north of the warm front, with only a small window
   for modest surface-based destabilization before cold frontal
   passage. The RAP, being the outlier, advances the unstable warm
   sector farther north. In either case, feel that at least a slight
   risk is warranted as far north as KY given the favorable kinematic
   environment and some potential for surface-based destabilization.

   Otherwise, a corridor of modest surface-based instability (500-1000
   J/kg MLCAPE) is expected to evolve in warm sector over the lower MS
   and western TN Valleys within zone of theta-e advection along the
   strengthening low-level jet. A band of thunderstorms will likely
   develop within this warm conveyor belt along and just ahead of the
   cold front from AR into LA by late morning and continue east during
   the afternoon. A strong mid-level jet rotating through base of the
   shortwave trough, coupled with the strengthening 50+ kt low-level
   jet, will promote very favorable wind profiles for severe storms.
   Large 0-2 km hodographs and 50+ kt effective bulk shear will support
   supercells with low-level mesocyclones and bowing structures capable
   of tornadoes and damaging wind, with peak period from afternoon into
   early evening.

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Just wanted to pitch in and say that today's 0z NAM3K solution looks a bit ominous for W TN and N MS, with broken cells traversing across a fairly high-EHI environment. 0Z HRRR is even more ominous, showing isolated cells from south-central MS up into central IL (with dewpoints >= 60F even there), with particularly severe-looking cells ahead of the cold front (which itself has broken cells along it) from south-central MS into southernmost KY, though I'm aware that specific model can be somewhat overdone.

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00Z CAMs (convective allowing models) have a couple different solutions. NAM high-res focuses on the quasi dry line coming out of Arkansas. ARW version of the WRF has storms going up on a pre-frontal trough a little farther east, starting in West Tennessee and Mississippi. HRRR wants to light up both. Agree that seems a little too aggressive.

Adding to low-level shear should be a morning rain induced boundary lifting north from Alabama into Middle Tennessee. Should be more stable north and east of it. 

The quasi dry line storms might be a little forced, perhaps a broken line, but with a few rotating. Deep level shear is impressive. I call it a quasi dry line because colder air lags behind with a separate wind shift.

If the pre-frontal trough becomes dominant, the storms could be more beefy and discrete, but perhaps sloppy. Low level shear is even a little better there. However storms would run into more stable air sooner. 

Again I really don't think both will go this set-up. Happened before in Dixie, and the Plains for that matter. However Saturday the instability axis may not be wide enough to get both going. Have to wait until morning to decide which one, or even nowcast it later.

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Hells bells. I'm siting in Chattanooga wishing I'd rolled out to Florence, AL. MCS coming out of Arkansas may be messy. However Mississippi and northwest Bama are destabilizing along and south of an outflow boundary OFB.

I now believe this OFB will be a focus for enhanced low level shear when storms reach it. Even more bullish, descrete cells in the free warm sector (Mississippi) heading into the said OFB would likely ramp up upon arrival. Not sure for how long, because it's stable on the other side. Still, it is a focus area.

Quasi dry line coming from central Arkansas may still refire behind the MCS. However I'm not a fan of right on the DL if a pre-frontal trough is available and looks promising. Appears the latter may be on the Mississippi River as I type Noon Central Time.

If I had departed on time I might target intersection of this pre-frontal trough and outflow boundary 2nd paragraph. Oh well, plenty of college hoops on today, lol!

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27 minutes ago, nrgjeff said:

Hells bells. I'm siting in Chattanooga wishing I'd rolled out to Florence, AL. MCS coming out of Arkansas may be messy. However Mississippi and northwest Bama are destabilizing along and south of an outflow boundary OFB.

I now believe this OFB will be a focus for enhanced low level shear when storms reach it. Even more bullish, descrete cells in the free warm sector (Mississippi) heading into the said OFB would likely ramp up upon arrival. Not sure for how long, because it's stable on the other side. Still, it is a focus area.

Quasi dry line coming from central Arkansas may still refire behind the MCS. However I'm not a fan of right on the DL if a pre-frontal trough is available and looks promising. Appears the latter may be on the Mississippi River as I type Noon Central Time.

If I had departed on time I might target intersection of this pre-frontal trough and outflow boundary 2nd paragraph. Oh well, plenty of college hoops on today, lol!

Just as you said that tornado watch

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I tried calling MEG NWS to let them know their severe warning polygons are NOT showing up on the NWS radar.  Flood warnings are depicted, but not svr.  Only got a recorded phone message that they have weekday hours.  Possibly some of you can help notify them for this upcoming dangerous afternoon.

 

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4 minutes ago, AMZ8990 said:

What are you thinking about the cells coming into Memphis now Jax?

The cell NW of Germantown is showing a little rotation right now

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Several svr storms breaking out now in Arkansas and MiS with one tor warned cell in Yazoo County and still no radar polygons for warnings.   Not acceptable.

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Indystorm I've noticed the maps for each forecast office seem to be stuck. LSX and SGF have been showing the same SVR polygon for a few hours now. JAN and MEG are not showing the tornado watch on their maps and the flash flood warnings are not updating on their maps either. The NOAA national map seems to be ok but the individual offices seem to be having a software problem.

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An error occurred while processing your request.

Reference #97.14ac3817.1550954734.c44e726

 

Yeah at times the site is down, other times not

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