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METALSTORM

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About METALSTORM

  • Birthday 12/17/1975

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Fenton MO
  • Interests
    weather/skywarn spotter,all kinds of music,football,baseball,hockey,too many other interests to list

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  1. Messy line with potential spinups. Looks like a few storms trying to fire ahead of it but nothing impressive yet as far as discreet cells go.
  2. DFW, Waco, and even down to near Austin look to be in play.
  3. I started a thread in the Southeastern sub. Whether it gets any traction over there is another story. I wonder if MS and AL should be adopted by the Central forum lol.
  4. Amazing info here. Now back to the regularly scheduled forecast of a half inch of snow possibly in the Piedmont on the 384hr NAM
  5. LSX calling for widespread 6 in plus across most of their forecast area and likely starting out as an icy mix of freezing rain/sleet. Potential for double digit amounts if some models are to be believed especially north of I-44. Interesting that this is going to play out on the anniversary of the 1982 surprise "blizzard" that paralyzed St Louis and surrounding areas.
  6. Where should I post for the LSX area? I feel like the mid MS Valley is a no man's land between this region and Central/Western sub.
  7. Does anyone know if there will be a NOAA service assessment?
  8. Would someone smarter than me (which is most) have an analog to compare this possible event to?
  9. In the past 11 years the St Louis area has experienced an EF4, two EF3s and several EF2s. The Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex has experienced EF3s and 4s in the past 10 years. And Oklahoma City and it's suburbs have been walloped by many tornados. EF5s have either struck OKC directly or slammed the suburbs. And so has multiple EF4s. It's not a matter of time. It's already happened. A lot.
  10. When these storms are hurricanes and they are just making landfall the tornados produced are usually weaker. Low end EF2 or lower. When they move inland, weaken to a sloppy low pressure area while transporting deep tropical moisture, and begin interacting with fronts and encountering wind shear is when deeper convection begins to develop and becomes supercellular in nature. Last night was a very good example of that. Stronger, long track tornados associated with severe thunderstorms, torrential rain, a lot of lightning with the stronger storms. The really odd thing of course was location. Eastern PA, NJ, NYC and LI, CT, and Cape Cod. Very rare event obviously.
  11. May Louie and Jackson run and play in the meadows of heaven.
  12. The damage reminds me of The Good Friday tornado in the St Louis area back in 2011.
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