Windspeed

Members
  • Content Count

    3,326
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Windspeed

  1. If it ever snows two feet in Atlanta, Ga., you better start looking north for an invasion of Others or White Walkers.
  2. lol, that's the most hysterical clown map I've ever seen. Unless the interglacial period has ended, the GFS should probably back up and punt.
  3. Yeah, I posted in the February Arctic Outbreak thread, but it really is too far out so I'll plop it down in here.
  4. Windspeed

    OBS

    OH MY GOD! HOW APOCALYPTIC! THE SNOW BAND REVERSED GRAVITY!
  5. Windspeed

    OBS

    Looks like a pretty good burst of moderate to heavy snow is about to pass through the region. Carver, you should be seeing something by now.
  6. Windspeed

    OBS

    I received 3/4" of fresh snow this morning. Looks like bands are lining up out of SE KY and should begin advancing through KTRI in about an hour, followed by strong NW flow. May get an additional inch or two this afternoon.
  7. Windspeed

    OBS

    UT didn't close? Oh wow...
  8. You probably won't wake up to anything. I don't believe precip will move into the KTRI area until the afternoon. The heavy stuff may not arrive until after 3 pm.
  9. They have the same problem forecasting rain as we do with snow this time of year.
  10. Next time a southern slider is forecast, I'm going to hype snow totals for Dayton, Ohio!
  11. Windspeed

    OBS

    The temperature plummeted like an anvil off a cliff. Sidewalk and driveway iced over. If you're in and around the Tri-Cities and you must drive, be mindful that there is definitely ice on the roads.
  12. Windspeed

    OBS

    That same band trained ESE right over my neck of the woods. I'm pretty sure I've got an inch of snow out of that heavy burst in little more than 30 minutes.
  13. Windspeed

    OBS

    The ground and trees are covered. Several nice bands of snow showers still moving through with gusty winds. Might squeeze out another inch before all this clears out.
  14. Only takes one big system to change the perspect of this winter. But you really have to be shaking your head at this point. Hoping something verifies for a few inches here and there is really disappointing. I would've thought we'd have seen something a little more substantial at this point for 2015, especially in the upper valley.
  15. Yeah, it's kind of slow right now in the weather deptartment. Not a lot to banter about there. So it's pretty easy to banter about other stuff that a lot of weather enthusiasts like to ramble on about this time of year, which, unsurprisingly is football, especially with the bowls and playoffs happening...
  16. The hype is going to be intense for the Volunteers heading into next season but I'm going to be a little more cautiously optimistic. Tennessee does return to prominence in 2015, perhaps even winning 10 games, but I think they're one more year away from being a national contender. They're still going to be a young team next year of prodominately sophomores. I'm not ruling them out of winning the East, but realistically, I think they'll finish #2 behind UGA. 2016 should be their year when they win the entire SEC and compete for a National Championship. They're definitely heading in the right direction.
  17. Hey Mike! Hope you're doing well, sir... 'tis the season. :)

  18. A .75-1 mile wide wedge tornado with roughly 40mph forward motion combined with EF5 intensity; the circulation had to have some pretty intense inflow. I would consider that the reason it lasted so long wasn't necessarily because folks were inside the condensation of the wedge for 2-3 minutes, but were getting hammered with 60-100mph wind gusts 30-40 seconds before and after it plowed through them. I can't imagine the terror of experiencing such intensity for so long when everything around you is obliterated and the shrapnel-laden wind is basically the equivalent of a shotgun blast.
  19. This may be the most real and disturbing literature I have read with regards to the events that unfolded that day. For all the fascinating aspects of severe weather, the human aspect of loss and death is something that gets separated from science, statistics and the curiosity we all share. We all pour over "the incident" as this thing of wonder and amazement. We all live vicariously through those that experience natural disasters first hand. But in the telling of a personal experience, such as this one, you feel the pull on that place in your guts that makes you a human being. Thanks for posting this, Jomo. Glad you and yours survived unscathed, physically, at least.
  20. A speed of 10mph is quite puzzling and this must be an error. If you match NEXRAD scans with the 22 mi damage path, it looks like the center of couplet was over Newton RD just SW Joplin around 22:33:52 GMT. At 22:42:47 GMT, the circulation is distinguishable by an enormous debris ball. The couplet weakens and dissipates around 23:05:02 GMT roughly 10-12 mi ESE of Joplin. If we loosely estimate a touch down around 22:30 and dissipation at 23:00, that would gives us 22 mi traveled in 30 minutes, which is 44mph. Granted, this is a loose estimate. A more exact approximation with the NEXRAD scans and spotter reports might give us something at or just shy of 40mph, which I believe is the official speed documented by the NWS.