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Central PA - Fall 2021


canderson
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Just now, Itstrainingtime said:

Pylons took on a new identity when the "Pylon Cam" was introduced - manufacturer had to step up the game with extra heavy duty pylon materials. 

Yea, sounds like the foam or chemicals to create the foam fell victim to Covid related backlog.   Instead of it being a TD when hitting the Pylon, a team will be penalized for breaking one of the few left. 

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The idea of following science and not models is something that good mets do. The new guy at Millersville took the time to explain the why behind it - good read in words that all can understand:

It's no secret that there's been a lot "hype" circulating over the potential for an early-season snowstorm in parts of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast early next week. In situations like these, it's very important to consider what's most likely to happen from a climatological perspective. Late-November climatology tells us that it's rare for a major snowfall to impact the Lower Susquehanna Valley and I-95 corridor from New York to Washington, D.C., and large-scale features in next week's weather pattern aren't in the right places for this rule to be broken. To understand why this is the case, it's critical to discuss the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and its role in promoting East Coast snowstorms.

The NAO is calculated based on the pressure difference between Iceland and the Azores Islands. A neutral or +NAO is often more common, given that high pressure often resides over the Azores with low pressure over Iceland and Greenland. However, a -NAO features a reversal of this pattern (high pressure over Greenland/Iceland and low pressure near the Azores). One of the most important players for mid-Atlantic and Northeast snowstorms is for this "blocking high pressure system" to develop, resulting in a -NAO. However, the presence of a -NAO in and of itself doesn't necessarily mean that a Northeast US snowstorm is a "lock." It is very important to look at where the -NAO is based.. is the center of the blocking high over Iceland/eastern Greenland (east-based -NAO) or to the west of Greenland (west-based -NAO)? An east-based -NAO does little to promote big, East-Coast snowstorms since low pressure systems won't feel the influence of the blocking high until they reach northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes. East-based -NAO patterns often result in storms tracking from the Midwest into the eastern Great Lakes or interior Northeast, leaving the mid-Atlantic and much of southern New England on the warm and rainy side of the system. A west-based -NAO, on the other hand, is much more conducive for big storms since systems feel its influence sooner and tend to track farther south across the U.S, slowing down upon arrival to the mid-Atlantic coast.

In this case, the NAO is currently positive but will slide into its negative phase by the early to middle part of next week. However, it'll be an east-based -NAO, and the blocking high won't reach its maximum intensity until Wednesday or Thursday. So, why didn't I jump on the "hype train" earlier in the week when some computer models were showing a major nor'easter with flooding rain and heavy snow in parts of the Northeast? First, as I already mentioned, climatology simply doesn't support it. More importantly, these computer models were showing the same NAO evolution earlier this week that they're still showing currently.. but were somehow suggesting a historic storm for the Northeast. I always look at the large-scale pattern and ask myself if what the models are showing is reasonable in relation to the state of that pattern. Instead of assuming the models are right, I ask myself where they may be going wrong. In this case, the "historic nor'easter" idea simply didn't align with the state of the pattern in the North Atlantic, let alone the pattern in the western U.S. and Pacific Ocean (which isn't at all conducive for early-season snow).

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16 minutes ago, Bubbler86 said:

But you would need a chip/sensor in every inch of the ball right?  Or can we only hold the ball one way with that deal?  

I would imagine the chips could communicate with the goal line wire within a certain distance (centimetres) and when combined with the use of a camera that slides on a cable the width of the field over the goallines, we could have a goalline technology similar to world football where the referees watch buzzes when a goal is scored

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6 minutes ago, Atomixwx said:

I would imagine the chips could communicate with the goal line wire within a certain distance (centimetres) and when combined with the use of a camera that slides on a cable the width of the field over the goallines, we could have a goalline technology similar to world football where the referees watch buzzes when a goal is scored

All this fandangled tech stuff is making sense. 

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18 minutes ago, Bubbler86 said:

All this fandangled tech stuff is making sense. 

 

25 minutes ago, Atomixwx said:

I would imagine the chips could communicate with the goal line wire within a certain distance (centimetres) and when combined with the use of a camera that slides on a cable the width of the field over the goallines, we could have a goalline technology similar to world football where the referees watch buzzes when a goal is scored

He had me at Chips

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27 minutes ago, TugHillMatt said:

You sure do hate that wind! lol... I think every time I check out your sub, you're commenting on it. Seems to be the new normal with the constant raging Pacific Jet. Wind, wind, wiiiiind.

My house is positioned where it makes a ton of noise and I’ve had to change fascia 7 times in 13 years. I hate it. 

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1 hour ago, canderson said:

My house is positioned where it makes a ton of noise and I’ve had to change fascia 7 times in 13 years. I hate it. 

 

40 minutes ago, Atomixwx said:

Reposition your house then, dumbass :lol:

He could move to Tamaqua. We have both natural and man made wind diffusers here. My peak gust remained at 12.5 mph all day long.

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1 minute ago, Bubbler86 said:

@Blizzard of 93, we are going to need some EPS magic to post any fun  AM Weather maps.  The Op's are desert's with moderate temps...some days near 60. 

Lol… it’s back and forth with most days below normal to normal. Maybe 1 or 2 warm days mixed in ahead of a cold front.
All is well on our step down to Winter.

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Just now, Blizzard of 93 said:

Lol… it’s back and forth with most days below normal to normal. Maybe 1 or 2 warm days mixed in ahead of a cold front.
All is well on our step down to Winter.

I was fine with the temps, I edited my post to be a little more smooth.  But its dry, dry.  The Palouse is taking all of our precip. 

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CLIMDT

CLIMATE REPORT 
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STATE COLLEGE PA
222 AM EST SAT NOV 20 2021

...................................

...THE HARRISBURG PA CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR NOVEMBER 19 2021...

CLIMATE NORMAL PERIOD 1991 TO 2020
CLIMATE RECORD PERIOD 1888 TO 2021


WEATHER ITEM   OBSERVED TIME   RECORD YEAR NORMAL DEPARTURE LAST      
                VALUE   (LST)  VALUE       VALUE  FROM      YEAR     
                                                  NORMAL           
...................................................................
TEMPERATURE (F)                                                          
 YESTERDAY                                                           
  MAXIMUM         46    134 PM  72    1913  53     -7       49       
                                      1921                           
                                      1928                           
  MINIMUM         34   1159 PM  18    1924  35     -1       28       
  AVERAGE         40                        44     -4       39  

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1 minute ago, Blizzard of 93 said:

CLIMDT

CLIMATE REPORT 
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STATE COLLEGE PA
222 AM EST SAT NOV 20 2021

...................................

...THE HARRISBURG PA CLIMATE SUMMARY FOR NOVEMBER 19 2021...

CLIMATE NORMAL PERIOD 1991 TO 2020
CLIMATE RECORD PERIOD 1888 TO 2021


WEATHER ITEM   OBSERVED TIME   RECORD YEAR NORMAL DEPARTURE LAST      
                VALUE   (LST)  VALUE       VALUE  FROM      YEAR     
                                                  NORMAL           
...................................................................
TEMPERATURE (F)                                                          
 YESTERDAY                                                           
  MAXIMUM         46    134 PM  72    1913  53     -7       49       
                                      1921                           
                                      1928                           
  MINIMUM         34   1159 PM  18    1924  35     -1       28       
  AVERAGE         40                        44     -4       39  

HIA still below average for the month.  Most of us are well below this number using MDT's numbers but still good to see a negative departure for once.

 

image.png.3a3043bce08e414ec12feeb2665b061a.png

 

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