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Phoenix Records its Hottest Summer on Record


donsutherland1
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Phoenix Experiences Latest 90° Days on Record

Often a great earthquake is followed by strong aftershocks that reverberate in the days and weeks that follow it. 2020 has witnessed a similar phenomenon in Phoenix following what was, by far its hottest summer on record. In this case, waves of unseasonable heat have recurred periodically deep into the autumn.

Summer 2020 had a mean temperature of 96.7°, which obliterated the previous mark of 95.1° set in 2013 and tied in 2015. Summer 2020 also saw July become Phoenix's hottest month on record and then August eclipse that record. The extreme heat of summer carried over into early September when the temperature topped out at 115°on September 5 and September 4-6 saw readings of 113° or above on each day.

Cooler weather returned, but Phoenix has witnessed five distinct heat episodes since then, the most recent of which produced that city's latest 90° temperatures on record:

1. Mid-September: Peak temperature: 109°, September 16-17

2. Early October: Peak temperature: 107°, October 1 (tied monthly record). October 1-5: 105° or above on each day. October 1-7: Hottest week on record in October.

3. Mid-October: Peak temperature: 102°, October 16. That brought Phoenix's total 100° days to 145, surpassing the record of 143 such days set in 1989.

4. Early November: Peak temperature 99°, November 5. That smashed the November record of 96°, which was most recently tied on November 1, 2020. November 1-5 was the warmest 5-day period on record in November.

5. Mid-November: Peak temperature: 92°, November 16-17. The previous latest 90° temperature on record occurred on November 15, 1999 when the temperature reached 90°.

In addition to surpassing the record for the latest 90° temperatures on record, November 2020 tied the monthly record of 7 such days. That record was set in 1999.

Table 1: 90° Days during November 2020:
Table-Nov-2020-1.jpg

Table 2: November Temperature Thresholds:
Table-Nov-2020-2.jpg

Table 3: Daily Record High Maximum Temperatures:
Table-Nov-2020-3.jpg

Table 4: Daily Record High Minimum Temperatures:
Table-Nov-2020-4.jpg

 

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  • 6 months later...

The climate models project that the Southwest will experience hotter and drier summers, leading to more frequent and severe droughts. Last year’s historic summer in Phoenix was a “throw-forward” summer that provided a glimpse of the future.

The newly-released climate normals are consistent with the climate modeling. Data for select cities is below:

Denver:
Change in summer temperature: +0.6°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.29”
Change in annual 90°F days: +6.8
Change in annual 100°F days: +0.4

Las Vegas:
Change in summer temperature: +1.4°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.07” (from 0.81” to 0.74”)
Change in annual 100°F days: +4.3
Change in annual 110°F days: +2.0

Phoenix:
Change in summer temperature: +0.6°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.21” (from 2.07” to 1.86”)
Change in annual 100°F days: +1.7
Change in annual 110°F days: +2.3

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3 hours ago, Typhoon Tip said:

California will be in a non-sustainable population crisis, inside of 30 years, without viable implementation in mass-produced desalination technology/advances necessary to make that happen.

You never know about California weather.

It had an atmospheric river/ flood that put the Central Valley under 20 feet of water back in 1862, to the painful surprise of the recent white immigrants. The native locals, who had seen this before , safely retreated to high ground before the event. 

Today, no one remembers and  so we remains similarly clueless and unprepared.

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On 6/11/2021 at 6:26 PM, etudiant said:

You never know about California weather.

It had an atmospheric river/ flood that put the Central Valley under 20 feet of water back in 1862, to the painful surprise of the recent white immigrants. The native locals, who had seen this before , safely retreated to high ground before the event. 

Today, no one remembers and  so we remains similarly clueless and unprepared.

 

The circulation engine of the hemisphere is changing - you speak as though we are still in 1862's planetary initial conditioning?

No -

 - and those may be a thing of that past.  The mechanisms that cause those bigger events, and even the smaller maintenance ones, are getting buried in the perennial expansion of the Hadley Cell.  - restorative hydration events become increasingly less frequent/ reposition closer to over 40N in latitude. 

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On 6/11/2021 at 2:28 PM, Typhoon Tip said:

California will be in a non-sustainable population crisis, inside of 30 years, without viable implementation in mass-produced desalination technology/advances necessary to make that happen.

Once Lake Mead dries up, several states will be in trouble.  30 years at the latest.

 

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On 6/11/2021 at 6:26 PM, etudiant said:

You never know about California weather.

It had an atmospheric river/ flood that put the Central Valley under 20 feet of water back in 1862, to the painful surprise of the recent white immigrants. The native locals, who had seen this before , safely retreated to high ground before the event. 

Today, no one remembers and  so we remains similarly clueless and unprepared.

We may have to start weather engineering.  Weather science should not be offlimits, we tinker with nature in every other science, why not weather too?

 

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8 hours ago, Typhoon Tip said:

 

The circulation engine of the hemisphere is changing - you speak as though we are still in 1862's planetary initial conditioning?

No -

 - and those may be a thing of that past.  The mechanisms that cause those bigger events, and even the smaller maintenance ones, are getting buried in the perennial expansion of the Hadley Cell.  - restorative hydration events become increasingly less frequent/ reposition closer to over 40N in latitude. 

How much energy would it take for us to engineer the Hadley Cell?  We will need weather and climate modification to make it to the next century.

 

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On 6/11/2021 at 11:37 AM, donsutherland1 said:

The climate models project that the Southwest will experience hotter and drier summers, leading to more frequent and severe droughts. Last year’s historic summer in Phoenix was a “throw-forward” summer that provided a glimpse of the future.

The newly-released climate normals are consistent with the climate modeling. Data for select cities is below:

Denver:
Change in summer temperature: +0.6°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.29”
Change in annual 90°F days: +6.8
Change in annual 100°F days: +0.4

Las Vegas:
Change in summer temperature: +1.4°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.07” (from 0.81” to 0.74”)
Change in annual 100°F days: +4.3
Change in annual 110°F days: +2.0

Phoenix:
Change in summer temperature: +0.6°F
Change in summer precipitation: -0.21” (from 2.07” to 1.86”)
Change in annual 100°F days: +1.7
Change in annual 110°F days: +2.3

Any changes we make towards renewable energy will be too late to change anything for the next century or so.  We're going to have to go full tilt towards climate modification, and part of that means redistributing rainfall from the east to the west.  Whatever the cost is, it must be done.  We do plenty of engineering in the other sciences, weather should not be off limits.

 

 

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6 hours ago, LibertyBell said:

Any changes we make towards renewable energy will be too late to change anything for the next century or so.  We're going to have to go full tilt towards climate modification, and part of that means redistributing rainfall from the east to the west.  Whatever the cost is, it must be done.  We do plenty of engineering in the other sciences, weather should not be off limits.

 

 

This is too pessimistic. Warming will stop when emissions stop. It is feasible to go all renewable plus other non-CO2 emitting in a couple of decades.

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On 6/11/2021 at 2:28 PM, Typhoon Tip said:

California will be in a non-sustainable population crisis, inside of 30 years, without viable implementation in mass-produced desalination technology/advances necessary to make that happen.

Good morning Tip. I took a quick look at the desalinization efforts in Florida. +/- good/bad,  result/effects . Are “ Technology/advances necessary”, most definitely. The sustainable population crises is showing up on the ‘awareness’ meters. Will certain state locations start/need to control their population growth? Will states rights, as a concept, be married to the evolving climate evolution? Will political/economic considerations mitigate the actions needed? Will the epitaph be written by a climate professional? As always ….

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8 hours ago, LibertyBell said:

Any changes we make towards renewable energy will be too late to change anything for the next century or so.  We're going to have to go full tilt towards climate modification, and part of that means redistributing rainfall from the east to the west.  Whatever the cost is, it must be done.  We do plenty of engineering in the other sciences, weather should not be off limits.

 

 

There would be risks, some of which are unforeseen, with geoengineering. For example, it might prove harmful for the overall environment. Moreover, if every country starts engaging in it, the outcome could be disruptive and have potential to lead to conflict. 

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1 hour ago, donsutherland1 said:

There would be risks, some of which are unforeseen, with geoengineering. For example, it might prove harmful for the overall environment. Moreover, if every country starts engaging in it, the outcome could be disruptive and have potential to lead to conflict. 

Yep, we see that in other industries too, like bio and chemical engineering.

 

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1 hour ago, rclab said:

Good morning Tip. I took a quick look at the desalinization efforts in Florida. +/- good/bad,  result/effects . Are “ Technology/advances necessary”, most definitely. The sustainable population crises is showing up on the ‘awareness’ meters. Will certain state locations start/need to control their population growth? Will states rights, as a concept, be married to the evolving climate evolution? Will political/economic considerations mitigate the actions needed? Will the epitaph be written by a climate professional? As always ….

with better education and lessening the influences of religion one would hope that population growth tapers off on its own.

 

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7 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

with better education and lessening the influences of religion one would hope that population growth tapers off on its own.

 

Ref: B D. “The answer my friend is blowin in the wind. The answer is blowin in the wind”. As always …….

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22 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

Yep, we see that in other industries too, like bio and chemical engineering.

 

Yes, that is true. My point is one would need to be careful when dealing with large-scale changes that may come with large unforeseen and unintended consequences. I believe that the safer course is more aggressive winding down of fossil fuel energy.

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3 minutes ago, donsutherland1 said:

Yes, that is true. My point is one would need to be careful when dealing with large-scale changes that may come with large unforeseen and unintended consequences. I believe that the safer course is more aggressive winding down of fossil fuel energy.

I see some amazing things going on in California

https://twitter.com/i/events/1404519631667216389

It has the best economy of any state by far and is already 21% powered by solar energy!

 

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4 hours ago, LibertyBell said:

That would be amazing but wont there be some lag before we can get CO2 levels to come down?

 

The main sink for CO2 is the oceans and the oceans take up heat and CO2 at roughly the same rate. If emissions stopped, CO2 concentrations would decrease fast enough to stabilize temperature.

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/340/6131/438.abstract

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On 6/15/2021 at 1:57 PM, chubbs said:

The main sink for CO2 is the oceans and the oceans take up heat and CO2 at roughly the same rate. If emissions stopped, CO2 concentrations would decrease fast enough to stabilize temperature.

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/340/6131/438.abstract

we also need to transition away from animal farming or at the very least limit it or change the way we do it.....like nature does it.....dont need to chop down trees and feed cattle lemongrass to limit emissions.

Better for our health to limit meat consumption too.

 

 

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