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am19psu

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Another factor that is underrated is cost, to you. Choosing to go to Penn State when you could pay in-state tuition to Rutgers, for example (for NJ residents), is probably not the best use of your money. Even when picking schools out-of-state... some are much cheaper than others with little difference in the quality of education at the undergrad level (where specialization isn't nearly as important), NC State, for example, is nearly $10,000/year cheaper for OOS students and I would argue that the program is just as good as Penn State's... then again, I'm an NCSU alum :P

Truth. One of the major factors in my decision to go to Albany rather than Penn State was the tuition for in-state NY vs. out-of-state PA (a difference of about $12k-$15k/yr after scholarships!).

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The truth is, as long as you're not getting it from DeVry, the name on your undergraduate degree in meteorology is not very important.

DeVry? What about Mississippi State?

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DeVry? What about Mississippi State?

A BS in Meteorology from Miss State is the same thing as a BS in Meteorology from Penn State. No one is going to make any hiring decision based on your undergrad location. Other things like good grades and educational diversity are much much more important. If you are talking about their certification program, that's a different story.

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A BS in Meteorology from Miss State is the same thing as a BS in Meteorology from Penn State. No one is going to make any hiring decision based on your undergrad location. Other things like good grades and educational diversity are much much more important. If you are talking about their certification program, that's a different story.

I was talking about Mississippi State's CBM program.

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A BS in Meteorology from Miss State is the same thing as a BS in Meteorology from Penn State. No one is going to make any hiring decision based on your undergrad location. Other things like good grades and educational diversity are much much more important. If you are talking about their certification program, that's a different story.

You know, I respectfully disagree to some extent -- and the bias is not typically intentional. That said envision two equally qualified candidates, one from Penn State and another from UNC Asheville. If an employer has a rich history of employing graduates from Penn State with little or no history of hiring UNCA grads, then I think it would default in the majority of cases to the Penn State candidate. I can even think of at least one overt case of bias (of which I have some personal knowledge) in a separate field... where candidates from a select school were admittedly favored over candidates from other schools. My opinion is that a school's "brand" has some weight, but that the risk incurred by taking on additional debt is more than the reward of potentially being held in favor over another candidate.

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You know, I respectfully disagree to some extent -- and the bias is not typically intentional. That said envision two equally qualified candidates, one from Penn State and another from UNC Asheville. If an employer has a rich history of employing graduates from Penn State with little or no history of hiring UNCA grads, then I think it would default in the majority of cases to the Penn State candidate. I can even think of at least one overt case of bias (of which I have some personal knowledge) in a separate field... where candidates from a select school were admittedly favored over candidates from other schools. My opinion is that a school's "brand" has some weight, but that the risk incurred by taking on additional debt is more than the reward of potentially being held in favor over another candidate.

I'd agree with this and I've seen it in action. I found out through inside sources that a job I bid on was given to someone from FSU, because the MIC went to FSU. Old school favorings are still alive and well.

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You know, I respectfully disagree to some extent -- and the bias is not typically intentional. That said envision two equally qualified candidates, one from Penn State and another from UNC Asheville. If an employer has a rich history of employing graduates from Penn State with little or no history of hiring UNCA grads, then I think it would default in the majority of cases to the Penn State candidate. I can even think of at least one overt case of bias (of which I have some personal knowledge) in a separate field... where candidates from a select school were admittedly favored over candidates from other schools. My opinion is that a school's "brand" has some weight, but that the risk incurred by taking on additional debt is more than the reward of potentially being held in favor over another candidate.

I'd agree with this and I've seen it in action. I found out through inside sources that a job I bid on was given to someone from FSU, because the MIC went to FSU. Old school favorings are still alive and well.

Yeah, I don't doubt either of these. It's the same thing if you were in Tau Kappa Epsilon and the guy doing hiring was TKE. You've got yourself an in. But those are specific cases. I think, in general, a BS in meteorology is a BS in meteorology.

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I don't know how we could get four jet streams in one atmosphere, so I would say no.

I was just wondering whether there is a "tropical jet" in addition to the normal three or something... Or if a hurricane were to merge with an extratropical system as it's triple-phasing... would that count?

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Is it possible for a storm to be quadruple-phased?

It's hard for me to imagine a system in which the polar and subtropical jets are both split with vort maxes all phasing... but I wont say it's impossible. It would be interesting if it did occur, however... :blink:

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I was just wondering whether there is a "tropical jet" in addition to the normal three or something... Or if a hurricane were to merge with an extratropical system as it's triple-phasing... would that count?

The only place I've ever seen a hurricane get involved with an extratropical system over land as you mention would be in the Canadian Maritimes. Even that is not quad phasing. And there really is NO jet stream in the tropics, it's just the trade winds.

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The only place I've ever seen a hurricane get involved with an extratropical system over land as you mention would be in the Canadian Maritimes. Even that is not quad phasing. And there really is NO jet stream in the tropics, it's just the trade winds.

OK.

It's hard for me to imagine a system in which the polar and subtropical jets are both split with vort maxes all phasing... but I wont say it's impossible. It would be interesting if it did occur, however... :blink:

How about all three jet streams split with vort maxes phasing? Sextuple-phaser, anyone?

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Is there anywhere online to get free radar archive dating back to 1990?

You can get national mosaic images back to 1995 easily:

http://www.ncdc.noaa.../radardata.html

You can download any data from 1991 to the present (if you want images from a single location/specific radar, you're going to have visualize it yourself....but the website has information for how to do that).

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How about all three jet streams split with vort maxes phasing? Sextuple-phaser, anyone?

Well when you have three distinct jet,s it's because either the subtropical jet or polar jet has split. I can't recall ever seeing both jets split simultaneously... and if it did occur I envision that it would be incredibly messy and am not sure much would develop out of it in terms of an organized storm system... too much interference.

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Strongly dissagree - I've heard that when applying for the NWS people from certain schools almost autmatically get bumped to the top in front of more qualified candidates.

A BS in Meteorology from Miss State is the same thing as a BS in Meteorology from Penn State. No one is going to make any hiring decision based on your undergrad location. Other things like good grades and educational diversity are much much more important. If you are talking about their certification program, that's a different story.

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Strongly dissagree - I've heard that when applying for the NWS people from certain schools almost autmatically get bumped to the top in front of more qualified candidates.

I never have heard anything like that.

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Strongly dissagree - I've heard that when applying for the NWS people from certain schools almost autmatically get bumped to the top in front of more qualified candidates.

I've never heard or seen that in the 30 years I worked fro the NWS.

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Strongly dissagree - I've heard that when applying for the NWS people from certain schools almost autmatically get bumped to the top in front of more qualified candidates.

No.

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I've never heard or seen that in the 30 years I worked fro the NWS.

I agree with you but do you think the NWS might reconsider some graduates if the program was not accredited yet they still graduated from college as a met?

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I agree with you but do you think the NWS might reconsider some graduates if the program was not accredited yet they still graduated from college as a met?

Are there any non-accredited universities that have meteorology programs? I'd think as long as they met the federal requirements for a meteorologist they could be considered one.

http://www.opm.gov/qualifications/standards/IORs/gs1300/1340.htm

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I never have heard anything like that.

I've never heard or seen that in the 30 years I worked fro the NWS.

IDK, I am not sure how the NWS operates.

Only 24 years in the NWS (still gasping at that thought!), and I've been involved in a couple of selection decisions over those years. When it came to thinning the list and when it came to a final recommendation to the MIC...the applicant's school was never even discussed. It always has come down to one question: "who has the best skill set in areas that the office needs to fulfill its responsibilities?" Can't say that it is universal, but would suspect it is true in general.

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What was the first computer model to pick up on the superstorm of 1993? How far in advance was it predicted?

The 1993 storm is often referenced as the first time that operational numerical guidance was able to suggest the development of something of that magnitude with a 5+ day lead time. There is a BAMS article that summarizes the numerical guidance for the storm:

Forecasting the 12–14 March 1993 SuperstormLouis W. Uccellini, Paul J. Kocin, Russell S. Schneider, Paul M. Stokols, Russell A. DorrBulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyVolume 76, Issue 2 (February 1995) pp. 183-199

Available here: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/1520-0477%281995%29076%3C0183%3AFTMS%3E2.0.CO%3B2

The predecessor to the GFS (the MRF/AVN) was generally better than the Euro and UK models for the 4-5 day forecasts leading up to the storm for the surface low. The short-range guidance (LFM, NGM, Eta, AVN) was mixed. It's a pretty interesting read, and there even includes a reference to 'convective feedback' in the discussion of the short-range guidance.

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