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Global Temperature 2021


blizzard1024
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29 minutes ago, LibertyBell said:

I'm also wondering how many more variants we can get and will we make it to the end of the Greek alphabet and get to an Omega variant? If that happened it would be so scary....aside from what comes after Omega I had a thought in my head about how symbolic the letter Omega is.  It could be "The One to end them all"..... a zombie virus (many think these are fiction but we actually see zombie parasites in the natural world, there is one that latches onto the brains of ants and makes them attack each other).....imagine if there was ever a human zombie virus like that and it ended up being the Omega variant?  That would almost make it seem like reality is scripted like a movie lol, like everything is leading up to that eventual final climax.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326871#1.-Zombie-ants

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326871#2.-Zombie-spiders

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326871#3.-The-reanimated-virus

This last one is especially interesting

In 2014, researchers from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique at Aix–Marseille Université in France dug a fascinating organism out of the Siberian permafrost: a so-called giant virus, about 30,000 years old, which they named Pithovirus sibericum.

Giant viruses are called this way because, though still tiny, they are easily visible under the microscope. But there is something else that makes P. sibericum stand apart. It is a DNA virus that contains a large number of genes — as many as 500, to be precise.

This is in stark contrast with other DNA viruses, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which only contains about 12 genes in all.

The size of giant viruses, as well as the fact that they contain such a large amount of DNA, can make them particularly dangerous, explain the researchers who discovered P. sibericum since they can stick around for an extremely long time.

“Among known viruses, the giant viruses tend to be very tough, almost impossible to break open,” explain two of the virus’s discoverers, Jean-Michel Claverie and Chantal Abergel, in an interview for National Geographic.

“Special environments such as deep ocean sediments and permafrost are very good preservers of microbes [and viruses] because they are cold, anoxic [oxygen-free], and […] dark,” they add.

When “reanimated, P. sibericum only infected amoebas — archaic unicellular organisms — but happily not humans or other animals. Yet Claverie and Abergel warn that there may be similar giant viruses buried inside the permafrost that could prove dangerous to humans.

Though they have remained safely contained so far, global heating and human action could cause them to resurface and come back to life, which might bring about unknown threats to health.

“Mining and drilling mean […] digging through these ancient layers for the first time in millions of years. If ‘viable’ [viruses] are still there, this is a good recipe for disaster.”
Jean-Michel Claverie and Chantal Abergel

Good evening Liberty. I finished a digital book called Empty Earth 11, by Roger Mannon. Your last paragraph, above, could have been inspired by the text of his story ‘Alone’. The second called Tipping Point you could have written or, at least collaborated on. If you ever have an opportunity please read them. As always ….

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On 11/30/2021 at 6:38 PM, rclab said:

Good evening Liberty. I finished a digital book called Empty Earth 11, by Roger Mannon. Your last paragraph, above, could have been inspired by the text of his story ‘Alone’. The second called Tipping Point you could have written or, at least collaborated on. If you ever have an opportunity please read them. As always ….

I would love to!  Sounds really interesting.  I actually write about a planetary tipping point where planetary self regulation takes over and decides that humanity has done enough damage and balance -- whatever the cost-- must be achieved.

 

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2 hours ago, Vice-Regent said:

For sure bro. I am somewhat taken back by how many other positive feedbacks are coming online.

The feedbacks impacting temperature aren't changing significantly.  Higher global temperature or ocean heat content generally means higher forcing from greenhouse gases.

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5 minutes ago, chubbs said:

The feedbacks impacting temperature aren't changing significantly.  Higher global temperature or ocean heat content generally means higher forcing from greenhouse gases.

There are many notable feedbacks coming online mainly associated with snowcover and sea ice. Namely the Hadley Cell circulation is not allowing the ocean surface to cool off.

People say ocean SSTa is going bonkers due to rising forcing but it's actually two-fold.

This is not a popular outlook because people want to believe that this horse can still be reigned in. The AGW menace is free to torment humanity for god knows how long no matter what we do.

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4 hours ago, Vice-Regent said:

There are many notable feedbacks coming online mainly associated with snowcover and sea ice. Namely the Hadley Cell circulation is not allowing the ocean surface to cool off.

People say ocean SSTa is going bonkers due to rising forcing but it's actually two-fold.

This is not a popular outlook because people want to believe that this horse can still be reigned in. The AGW menace is free to torment humanity for god knows how long no matter what we do.

You are covering a lot of bases. Not aware of any new feedbacks. Snow/ice feedback is well understood. You may be confusing impacts, tipping points and feedbacks. Can you provide references? 

As far as the future. Warming is directly related to CO2 emissions. The more we emit the more we warm. Irreversible for tens of thousands of year, unless we remove CO2 from the atmosphere, which won't be cheap or easy. So yes we will be dealing with AGW for a long time, but the amount of warming is up to us. We are far from helpless, shortsighted yes, helpless no.

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5 hours ago, chubbs said:

You are covering a lot of bases. Not aware of any new feedbacks. Snow/ice feedback is well understood. You may be confusing impacts, tipping points and feedbacks. Can you provide references? 

As far as the future. Warming is directly related to CO2 emissions. The more we emit the more we warm. Irreversible for tens of thousands of year, unless we remove CO2 from the atmosphere, which won't be cheap or easy. So yes we will be dealing with AGW for a long time, but the amount of warming is up to us. We are far from helpless, shortsighted yes, helpless no.

Maybe it will be good in the long term, more areas with vegetation so more land to farm.

Hey, we have to look at the positives since we can't really control this anymore.

 

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12 hours ago, bdgwx said:

All of the data is; at least all of the data I track. The 13 month moving average of the composite is now close to the trendline of +0.187 C/decade as we close out 2021.

 

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Not good when back-to-back moderate ninas barely get you to the trendline, after 40+ years of warming.

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