Jump to content
  • Member Statistics

    15,515
    Total Members
    7,904
    Most Online
    chrislittlenews
    Newest Member
    chrislittlenews
    Joined
Sign in to follow this  
Chinook

Mountain West Discussion

Recommended Posts

July 5 lightning bolt (look at the bright spot in the cloud on #1)

Xy6lLAp.jpg

 

July 5th nighttime

lVHFxVD.jpg

 

4lTikCI.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was fun to hear the comparisons of the human-made and natural fireworks on 7/4. Pop, pop, pop bang pop pop... BOOOOOOMMMM.

We got about an inch of rain on the day we had a 10% chance of precip, and nothing on the day we had a 70% chance. Ah, probabilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, a thunderstorm occurred here at sunset. It was a small storm, that made the rainy western sky look totally orange, with a few lightning bolts. 

Here is a storm from a few minutes ago that left a circular outflow boundary, evident in radar and visible satellite

FeDX9nH.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The NWS says 100-101 degrees for Thursday and Friday for the northern Colorado metro areas. It should be at least this hot for SE Colorado (Arkansas River Valley).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up just a tad shy of 2" of rain on Saturday evening, north of Estes Park.  Much the same today, with .5" thus far and booming thunder.  I had to drain some water from my pool, which is quite unusual. This week looks to be wet as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/21/2019 at 4:12 PM, ValpoVike said:

I picked up just a tad shy of 2" of rain on Saturday evening, north of Estes Park.  Much the same today, with .5" thus far and booming thunder.  I had to drain some water from my pool, which is quite unusual. This week looks to be wet as well. 

Radar-estimated rainfall for that day. yellow =1" red = 2", magenta = 3". There are a couple of pixels of magenta on the north side of US-36, east of Estes Park.

FDD27QF.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Summer forecast had a fairly dry July for the SW before the Monsoon kicked in strongly during August. We'll see how that goes shortly. The warm signal in the data for the East has largely verified pretty well. Very hard to find a cold July in the East when Nino 3.4 is warm in March-May.

EAH6bQkUYAE4DS4.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Chinook said:

Radar-estimated rainfall for that day. yellow =1" red = 2", magenta = 3". There are a couple of pixels of magenta on the north side of US-36, east of Estes Park.

FDD27QF.jpg

Thanks!  I am close to Glen Haven which is NE of the town, along CR43.  The red there aligns pretty closely with my location.  We have been in the sweet spot for good rains over the past few days.  The grass is getting a bit high on my mountain side, and the wildflowers are really popping too.  It is awesome to see it so green at this point in the summer, and no fire bans yet!

BTW - I was not home for the rain event on Saturday, having just missed it by an hour and a half.  I was returning home from a day on the west slope, and had a white knuckle experience at sunset driving over Trail Ridge Road which was firmly in the cloud deck.  Visibility up there was less than 100', which isn't much fun on that particular road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was posted in the local facebook group for Estes Park and was taken yesterday 7/24 at 12:10pm in RMNP.  Cold air funnel?  Just as crazy...this reportedly was photographed from the ledges on the Long's Peak Keyhole route, which is a very dangerous place to be in the afternoon with thunderstorms around.

Image may contain: cloud, mountain, sky, outdoor and nature

Image may contain: sky, mountain, outdoor and nature

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting- no LSRs at all yesterday from NWS BOU, and no tornado reports to SPC. And I don't know about up in Estes Park, but it certainly wasn't cold at the surface or above in the Denver Metro area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, mayjawintastawm said:

Interesting- no LSRs at all yesterday from NWS BOU, and no tornado reports to SPC. And I don't know about up in Estes Park, but it certainly wasn't cold at the surface or above in the Denver Metro area.

Looking at historical radar, it looks like there was a cell over Grand Lake at this time which seems to be the direction from the photo.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mayjawintastawm said:

Interesting- no LSRs at all yesterday from NWS BOU, and no tornado reports to SPC. And I don't know about up in Estes Park, but it certainly wasn't cold at the surface or above in the Denver Metro area.

Mystery solved, the below photo is from NWS Boulder Twitter feed and taken from Grand Lake.  It appears that it did not touch down, and the NWS is calling it a likely cold air funnel.

EAVG2B_W4AE-v8T.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today, moisture values and CAPE values are higher than normal, with a few storms right now east of I-25, with some light rain at Boulder and Denver right now. Maybe there could be more storms this evening. For July, this area was 1-2 degrees F above normal. (1.3 degrees F above normal at Fort Collins.) The rainfall was alright but below normal. My best estimation is that Loveland got 1.05" and Fort Collins got 1.27".  So finally, after our cool and cloudy springtime and the cool and cloudy month of June, the prairie grasses are getting tan.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some development of severe storms is possible near Denver today. SPC has an enhanced risk of severe storms out near Goodland.  The storm near Castle Rock looks like it will get a severe storm warning in the next hour.

AVjjgWy.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some tornadoes and hail up to 4" in diameter have hit northeast Colorado. This radar image is north of Wray, CO.

PEONKjs.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
https://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/watch/ww0574.html

URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
   Severe Thunderstorm Watch Number 574
   NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
   940 PM CDT Sun Aug 11 2019

   The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a

   * Severe Thunderstorm Watch for portions of 
     North Central Kansas
     South-Central Nebraska

   * Effective this Sunday night and Monday morning from 940 PM
     until 500 AM CDT.

   ...THIS IS A PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS SITUATION...

   * Primary threats include...
     Widespread damaging winds expected with scattered significant
       gusts to 85 mph likely
     Scattered large hail and isolated very large hail events to 2
       inches in diameter possible
     A couple tornadoes possible

   SUMMARY...A developing bow echo over northwest Kansas will move
   rapidly eastward overnight, posing a risk of widespread damaging
   wind gusts across the watch area.  Large hail and a tornado or two
   are also possible.

   The severe thunderstorm watch area is approximately along and 60
   statute miles north and south of a line from 40 miles northwest of
   Hill City KS to 15 miles south southeast of Beatrice NE. For a
   complete depiction of the watch see the associated watch outline
   update (WOUS64 KWNS WOU4).

   PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

   REMEMBER...A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are
   favorable for severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch area.
   Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for threatening
   weather conditions and listen for later statements and possible
   warnings. Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce
   tornadoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took this shot last night at 9:30pm from my deck looking east down to Loveland. This is the storm that fired along the outflow, and it was continuous lightning. The bonus was the nearly full moon peeking around the storm.

20190813_213537.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, ValpoVike said:

I took this shot last night at 9:30pm from my deck looking east down to Loveland. This is the storm that fired along the outflow, and it was continuous lightning. The bonus was the nearly full moon peeking around the storm.

 

I think I saw some of that last night. I went outside at about 10:30 and there were thunderstorms just east of Fort Collins and just south of Loveland. I could definitely see the whole cloud lighting up with lightning near Loveland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some areas of Kansas and Nebraska have gotten 3-6" of rain in one week.  My place has gotten about 0.20" of rain in an entire month.

Z8lNgq0.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Chinook said:

Some areas of Kansas and Nebraska have gotten 3-6" of rain in one week.  My place has gotten about 0.20" of rain in an entire month.

yeah, we're quite dry over the past month too, probably more like 0.5". Nonsoon weather for sure. Hope it materializes late.

Where the heck is the moisture source for the KS/NE rains? It all seems to be coming from the NW- could that much Pacific moisture make it that far?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mayjawintastawm said:

yeah, we're quite dry over the past month too, probably more like 0.5". Nonsoon weather for sure. Hope it materializes late.

Where the heck is the moisture source for the KS/NE rains? It all seems to be coming from the NW- could that much Pacific moisture make it that far?

Take a look at the Western US water vapor loop and it will make more sense.  It is very common for the midwest.

For the monsoon, we actually did well up here over the past 3 weeks.  There were a few rounds of storms and some soaking rains, including what I call "the annual rain that washes my driveway away".  It was a hit or miss apparently.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/11 (Sunday) apparently there was a 4.83" hailstone at Otis, Colorado, which is a new state record. NWS Goodland mentioned it on their web page, and twitter feed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denver has had highs of 99 on Monday and 98 today. 99 set a record high for 8/19.  Fort Collins set record highs of 96 and then 98. Today, my area got to 96-99, and then we got a cold front, concurrent with a thunderstorm outflow boundary traveling westward from Weld County. The temperature dropped to 80 and stayed near 80 for most of the evening. We have had a lack of significant rain for many days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Radar shows that about 1" fell at about the Denver city limits, up to 3.12" south of downtown, on I-25

iFYXjR2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×