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Found 8 results

  1. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Spotty light rain impacted portions of Connecticut on February 4th as a frontal boundary slowly advanced east through the area. As the front became nearly stationary near the coast, a wave of low pressure developed over eastern North Carolina early on the 5th. As low pressure organized, colder air filtered in and precipitation changed to snow across Connecticut. The storm system moved swiftly to the northeast, but there were several hours of moderate to heavy snow across parts of southern and eastern New England, as well as Long Island. The heaviest snow in Connecticut was observed from New Haven County, northeastward into interior periods of eastern Connecticut. Some of the hill towns in northeastern Connecticut reported just over a foot of snow. Snow came to an end between late morning and the afternoon hours on the 5th.
  2. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Snow reached southern Connecticut during the predawn hours on January 23rd. The snow gradually moved inland, dropping the most persistent bands of moderate to heavy snow on an axis from Fairfield County, northeastward into New Haven County and parts of eastern Connecticut. As low pressure slowly moved east to the south of Long Island, precipitation never reached the far northwest corner of the state. During the peak of the storm, winds consistently gusted to between 30 and 40 mph along the shoreline. No Connecticut stations officially reached blizzard criteria, but near-blizzard conditions affected southwestern Connecticut at times. Breaks in the precipitation shield across southeastern Connecticut resulted in locally lower amounts of snow, particularly across New London County. Snow quickly came to an end in all areas early on January 24th, ending from west to east across the state. The Blizzard of 2016 affected a large portion of the United States from the Arklatex region, eastward to the East Coast. The most intense snowfall fell from the Mid-Atlantic states into the New York City metropolitan area. Snowfall totals of 2 to 3 feet were common here, with a few locally higher amounts. All-time single event snowfall records were set at Allentown, Baltimore, Harrisburg and New York City’s JFK Airport. A record daily snow depth was also set at Washington Dulles International Airport. Both Harrisburg and JFK Airport reported 14 straight hours of snowfall rates of 1 to 3 inches per hour during the height of the storm. JFK Airport observed 30.2 inches of snow in one calendar day on January 23rd.
  3. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Areas of weak low pressure moved through the Ohio Valley along a frontal boundary on February 21st and periods of light snow moved into Connecticut during the afternoon. The snow gradually became moderate to briefly heavy at times during the evening. Due to the frontal boundary being west of the state, winds were generally out of the south to southwest ahead of low pressure, through the event. This led to temperatures rising into the lower 30s overnight. Snow changed to sleet, roughly as far northwest as I-84. A narrow corridor of freezing rain was reported just to the northwest of I-95. Some areas changed to plain rain south and east of I-95 along the coast and east of I-395 in far eastern Connecticut. Precipitation changed back to snow in all areas before ending on the morning of the 22nd. Most of the state reported a 4 to 8 inch snowfall. A few totals just over 8 inches were reported in Litchfield and Tolland counties. Snowfall totals along and southeast of the I-395 to I-95 corridor were generally in the range of 2 to 4 inches. The immediate shoreline in southeastern Connecticut reported around or just under 2 inches.
  4. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. As low pressure moved east from the Great Lakes, some modest warm advection light snow developed around Connecticut during the morning and afternoon on February 14th. The snow was intermittent and amounts were generally less than two inches during the daylight hours. The storm system rapidly intensified east of New England overnight and some bands of moderate to heavy snow rotated through eastern Connecticut. The snow tapered off on Sunday, during the morning in most areas, but not until early afternoon near the Rhode Island border. Snowfall totals ranged from less than two inches across far western and southwestern Connecticut, to four to eight inches across most eastern portions of the state. A few totals up to nine inches were reported, across the hills of Tolland County and across southeastern Windham County.
  5. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. This event was spread out over three days as low pressure passed along a frontal boundary, draped from the Ohio Valley into southern New England. On the first day, Saturday, February 7th, occasional flurries and a few bands of light snow passed through Connecticut. Snowfall totals on this day were generally an inch or less around the state. On Sunday, February 8th, scattered snow showers and flurries continued. During the evening hours, a band of heavier snow developed from roughly Danbury to Meriden. Outside of that band, daily snowfall totals were mainly less than two inches. Snow across Connecticut, especially northern portions of the state, became steadier after midnight. Snow, heavy at times, continued through much of the day on Monday, February 9th. The heaviest snowfall affected the northern portion of the state. Snow finally tapered off during the evening hours in Windham County. The majority of the total snowfall from this event occurred on Monday. Through the event, there was some mixing with sleet, graupel and freezing drizzle across the southern half of Connecticut. Mixed precipitation was the dominant precipitation type in lower Fairfield County and much of New London County. Some shadowing of snowfall totals can be noted west of the hills in northwestern Connecticut and across the Connecticut River Valley. There, snowfall totals were generally 4 to 8 inches. Some localized 8"+ snowfall amounts were reported in west-central Connecticut and across some of the higher elevations in Tolland and Windham counties.
  6. Here is a snowfall map using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Occasional flurries developed on Sunday, February 1st across Connecticut. A steadier snow moved in after midnight with some moderate to heavy snow during the morning hours on February 1st. By 7 to 8 a.m., precipitation changed to sleet across lower Fairfield County. Snow mixed with and changed to sleet in most areas up to roughly I-84 from mid to late morning. There was some spotty freezing rain as well, mainly for a short time near the I-95 corridor. As colder air worked in behind a low pressure system passing by east of Long Island, precipitation quickly changed back to all snow across the state. An intense band of heavy snow formed across western Connecticut and moved from west to east across the state. This band of snow was producing 2″+ per hour snowfall rates. Snow quickly tapered off by mid-afternoon in western Connecticut and by early evening near the Rhode Island border. The majority of the state saw anywhere from 8 to 12 inches of snowfall. Locally higher amounts were reported in the northwestern and northeastern hills. Southeastern Connecticut, where there was the longest period of sleet and freezing rain, had anywhere from about 5 to 8 inches of snowfall.
  7. Here is a snowfall map that I created using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Light rain developed during the morning hours on November 26th and mixed with some sleet inland. Wet snow initially confined to the far northwestern corner of the state. As steadier precipitation moved in, a slight southeast shift of the snow/sleet line was observed with some modest evaporational cooling. However, much of coastal and southeastern Connecticut stayed predominantly rain. The main reason for the mixed precipitation and sleet was a warm layer in the atmosphere around 700mb. As precipitation became heavy, sleet fell across much of central Connecticut. Wet snow continued across northwestern Connecticut and rain moved as far northwest as Meriden and Hartford with some warming aloft nudging into the valleys. Even in those areas, the 2-meter temperature hovered around 34 degrees for much of the event, which did not allow for significant amounts of snow to accumulate. Precipitation tapered off to scattered snow showers by early evening. As cooler air gradually funneled in, a light additional accumulation of snow was reported in many areas. A few broken, but locally enhanced bands of snow continued into the early morning hours on the 27th. The greatest snowfall totals were in the range of 6 to 10 inches across northwestern Connecticut. Totals dropped off fairly quickly to the south and east. A narrow area of 3 to 6 inches was observed near and just northwest of I-84. Just southeast of there, 1 to 3 inches was reported and the southeastern third of the state generally saw less than one inch of snow. Where the snow did accumulate, it had a very high water content, especially those areas that battled between a mixture of snow, sleet and rain.
  8. Here is a snowfall map that I created using reports from various sources. Many of the reports came from this forum and the National Weather Service. Only social media reports that passed through quality control were considered. All reports gathered were carefully considered and compared before being included. Light rain, with light snow across the higher elevations, developed across Connecticut during the evening hours of November 13th. The steadiest and heaviest snow fell around midnight and tapered off during the pre-dawn hours on November 14th. Most locations eventually changed to snow, with the exception being the immediate shoreline and urban coastal corridor from New Haven down toward the New York border. On average, the hills saw anywhere from 1 to 3 inches of snow, with generally an inch or less across the valleys and shoreline. The highest amounts around and just over 3 inches were reported in Litchfield County.