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Bugnadoes

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I was in an F-off bugnado in Algonquin Park in May, 1974, as well as an F-U bugnado in Manitoba in July, 1984.

The sound of a bugnado reminds a lot of people of a freight train just as it starts slowing down for a level crossing.

Some people confuse a bugnado with straight-line bug damage, but in the latter, most of the victims are scratching only one side of their body, while in a bugnado, victims are scratching everywhere.

:scooter:

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I was in an F-off bugnado in Algonquin Park in May, 1974, as well as an F-U bugnado in Manitoba in July, 1984.

The sound of a bugnado reminds a lot of people of a freight train just as it starts slowing down for a level crossing.

Some people confuse a bugnado with straight-line bug damage, but in the latter, most of the victims are scratching only one side of their body, while in a bugnado, victims are scratching everywhere.

:scooter:

ROFLMFAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I was in an F-off bugnado in Algonquin Park in May, 1974, as well as an F-U bugnado in Manitoba in July, 1984.

The sound of a bugnado reminds a lot of people of a freight train just as it starts slowing down for a level crossing.

Some people confuse a bugnado with straight-line bug damage, but in the latter, most of the victims are scratching only one side of their body, while in a bugnado, victims are scratching everywhere.

:scooter:

HaHAha WINNING!

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I was in an F-off bugnado in Algonquin Park in May, 1974, as well as an F-U bugnado in Manitoba in July, 1984.

The sound of a bugnado reminds a lot of people of a freight train just as it starts slowing down for a level crossing.

Some people confuse a bugnado with straight-line bug damage, but in the latter, most of the victims are scratching only one side of their body, while in a bugnado, victims are scratching everywhere.

:scooter:

Are bugnadoes also rated according to damage indicators? If I used Extreme Super Duper Über Strength Deliverance-Deep Woods Off and scratch off my skin completely (clean-slab complete), I suppose that would get a F-U BAR rating?

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It does look like a tornado occasionally. It would be funny if a storm chaser got confused.

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There is also the phenomenon known as the de-itcho. (maybe I should quit while I'm behind) :thumbsup:

Bugnado-genesis requires a strong blood front which was present but unfavorable upper level deet winds sheared-OFF the developing cloud tops :arrowhead: I vote your previous post, post of the year award! epic win

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