Uncle Bobby

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Everything posted by Uncle Bobby

  1. I posted the pic of the Van Halen snowstorm concert on here a couple weeks ago. I didn't remember the exact date, but it turns out it was September 20. VHND posted a story about it for the 25th anniversary. The story says there was 9" on the ground. http://www.vhnd.com/2020/09/20/25-years-ago-van-halen-performs-during-summer-snowstorm/
  2. Here in SE CO we didn't get any snow. Lamar recorded a low this morning of 35.6°F, which is not a record. The high was 42.8°F. This beats the old record for lowest maximum by 30°!!! So, now I'm wondering what the record is for obliterating an old record! If you went back to the first 30 or 40 years of recordkeeping you would find that a lot, but I bet it hasn't happened in close to 70 or 80 years. Wow.
  3. lol... thanks? I also just saw that Denver has a winter storm warning, and they just posted a high of 92. Pretty incredible. We're supposed to get a little precip down here, not a lot. I went to a Van Halen concert at Fiddlers Green in mid-September 1995. Snow was in the forecast, but the fans showed up anyway, so the guys in the band were like "Hey, the fans showed up, so we're playing!" About 6" came down on us during the concert. Alex played the drums shirtless. Sammy was laughing at us and said we all looked like little snowcones. In an interview many years later Eddie was asked if there were any concerts through the years that he remembered as being special. He said "Well, no, not really. We've played so many concerts. But, you know what? There was this ONE concert in Colorado where it snowed..."
  4. I live near Lamar CO where yesterday's record high of 107.6°F is also a record for all of September. Mid-90's today, snow by Wednesday morning!
  5. Winds push the air up the mountains. The air expands and cools and latent heat is released when the cooling air causes condensation in the form of rain or snow, which falls on the mountains. Same reason Gulf moisture is responsible for Tornado Alley... latent heat. Air continues down the eastern slopes of the mountains into Denver, latent heat released but sans precipitation that would otherwise then be evaporating and cooling (re-absorbing the latent heat), so after it has re-compressed to the pressure at 5000 feet it is now warmer than it was back over in Grand Junction. Same pressure (more or less) but now drier and warmer.
  6. Moderately Unstable's answer is just too damn complicated! You have to consider the structure of a supercell and its motion. Whether or not you get hail first depends on that and where you happen to be. The "classic" situation is a sup moving NE and upper level winds also ventilating the top of the storm to the NE. To get hail before rain you have probably found yourself in the spot just a little south of the anvil's rain with the updraft/rain free base SW or WSW of you, and you are in the worst place to be. Unless you're stormchasing, in which case you are in the best place to be (sort of)!
  7. If you had just posted this I wouldn't answer because I'm no expert, but since nobody else has answered in 2½ days I'll offer you what I have read. Unidirectional shear, also often referred to as a straight-line hodograph, means parallel orientation with height as you describe. I suppose you don't get such violent straight-line surface winds if there is directional shear (veering or backing with height) because then you get rotation in the convection, if only a little. I don't know what wind shear compaction means. I have read that a strong jet at ~500mb is required for a derecho to occur, so I believe that would be your linear forcing mechanism. A squall line develops when you have unidirectional winds parallel to the squall line, e.g. winds out of the SW at (pretty much) all heights along a cold front and the squall develops from, say, Wichita to KC, or Louisville to Columbus OH. A derecho will have a strong 500mb jet perpendicular to the derecho's orientation. I have no idea, I never looked at any of the data, but I therefore assume that there was a 500mb jet coming out of the west in Iowa, and that the derecho convection was oriented in a N-S line, or bow, and moved rapidly eastward. I was actually myself caught up in two of the most famous derechos in history; July 4, 1970 in Cleveland OH and May 27, 2001 in SW KS.
  8. I don't know, but if I had to guess my guess would be that that is their own in-house radar, and they can make it do that and think it looks cool... and sort of retro, I suppose. I use GRL3 and it always has the latest data available and also updates automatically. I know it is the latest data because I use it for stormchasing and I'm standing RIGHT THERE half the time.
  9. I looked to see if Norton KS shows up on my AllisonHouse feed for GRL3 yet... nope. It's a question for the AH forum, but I assume they'll get all the new ones added eventually.
  10. For a national synopsis I like http://www.spc.noaa.gov/compmap/ or https://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/mesoanalysis/new/viewsector.php?sector=19&parm=pmsl Visible Satellite for PA: http://mp1.met.psu.edu/~fxg1/PSUGOES_NE/vrecent.html For other flavors go here: http://mp1.met.psu.edu/~fxg1/PSUGOES_US/index.html You're in PA and didn't know what an awesome met site PSU has? You should have GRL3 for local radar.
  11. You do know you can save the files by clicking file>save image, right? You have to do that in real-time, of course, not two days later, though if you have had GRL3 running for awhile you can back up and save images from, say, 45 minutes ago. On my computer they are saved as .png files, but I don't know if that is universal. Have you been to this page? Read everything very carefully. You may be able to solve your problem there. http://www.grlevelx.com/grlevel3_2/
  12. I still have the video of Homestead post-Andrew, the worst devastation I have ever seen, and I'm not sure this isn't worse. OMFG
  13. Lake Charles hasn't even seen minor flooding, and the level has receded with low tide.
  14. Cantore showing us a puddle in the hotel.
  15. Yeah, except it doesn't look like there's much of anything out there. No towns, no roads, no obs stations....
  16. Yeah, the center of the eye went right over that spot.
  17. I am very disappointed to see how fast you guys are able to provide TWC links
  18. This? This is the last image before LCH went down:
  19. Surge is over 8 feet at Calcasieu Pass
  20. Um, yeah, you have a good point there.