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CTFarmer

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About CTFarmer

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  • Location:
    Cobalt, CT
  1. Actually, this is the home base back yard with 50/50 shade/sun where I mounted the PWS sensors (for balanced sampling). In the fields, I'm certain it is brutal. Just hit 99 even. Breeze has kicked-up a little, that helps make it tolerable. My day job is in State House Square in downtown Hartford, I'll figure out just how hot is it when I walk out the lobby in a few hours.
  2. Hit 98.4 on my PWS at 11:41am. https://www.wunderground.com/personal-weather-station/dashboard?ID=KCTEASTH34
  3. My PWS already hit 75.4 today, coming off a morning low of 41.2. South-central CT right on the CT River cliffs.
  4. Just got a blast of 1/2" hail in Middlesex County CT. I got slo-mo video... too big to upload ATM..
  5. Absolutely. Usually your local AG feed store (not Agway) has the best grass seed and other seed mixes ("pasture" mix). All the crap at HD/Lowes/TSC sucks. Your local septic system company will definitely know the best local seed to use and where to get it. As for fertilizers, yeah- 2-4,D is horrible and the most typical "weed control" compound in residential stuff. ALL New England field crops are grown with Glyphosate (commercially branded 'Round Up'), that's the only way to keep the weeds down. Every corn field you see is sprayed with it at least once a year. You're eating it no matter what. Ever wonder why rice is grown in standing water? Rice will grow, weeds will not.
  6. Still ripping snow in downtown Hartford, no accumulation on asphalt. Visibility low. Home PWS says 34.5 and still snowing there (275'). (Edit- flipped to rain at about 2:30PM.) https://www.wunderground.com/personal-weather-station/dashboard?ID=KCTEASTH34
  7. Sandy 2012 and after (normal) picture of the road into Leete's Island in Guilford. Feet of sand and rock was deposited.
  8. Some videos from a neighbor on Leete's Island in Guilford, CT. Irene and Sandy were the worst since Gloria in 1985. Footage is of both Leete's Island bay and Great Harbor on the east side. It was surge on the tide that did so much damage, actually the outgoing surge did the most damage. I made it in from RT146 on a backhoe 2 days after. There was still standing water. Sections of my dock were 1+ miles inland literally on RT146. There was 200lb propane tanks out in the debris strew in the salt marsh, some still hissing. The waves on the bedrock was just a grinder, anything in the water was pulverized. To the west in Branford:
  9. Carolina ridging stays put or gets shoved in that case? Stronger = poleward? Edit: Anyone trying to cut hay in New England cares A LOT right now.
  10. As we transition to La Nina, ONI is currently 0.2 for MJJ (not sure when JJA comes out)- are we headed into a weak La Nina? http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/ensostuff/ensoyears.shtml I can't find the post to credit, but someone previously noted that weak La Nina years have featured Irene (2011), Bertha (1996), Gloria(1985), Donna, Carol, 1944 and 1938 storms. Thoughts? EDIT: Found post:
  11. Finally CT DEEP has acknowledged the Gypsy Moth caterpillar problem in eastern CT. Setting up for a worse year the following if we don't get a prolonged wet pattern. Meanwhile, it's now July and lots of hay guys haven't been able to get a decent 2nd cutting yet. No rain and we're going to be buying hay from Canada again. Sucks. http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-ct-gypsy-moth-caterpillar-infestation-0701-20160630-story.html
  12. Just about any Ash trees- green/white/etc, are nearly 100% infected now throughout New England (source- buddy is South Central CT Regional Water Authority arborist). In some of the last few meso wind events, we've had power outages mostly caused by dead Ash trees here in south central CT, where Green Ash trees are wild (and despite Eversource's never-ending tree trimming efforts). They are normally shallow-rooted and blow over easy anyways. Metro areas will have the worst problems with dead limbs falling off from a height. Municipal arborists have their work cut out for them to get the funds to remove them all where ever they will become a hazard. And the Gypsy moths- they are creeping into south-central CT from the southeast for sure. CT DEEP keeps telling me, "when it rains, fungi will destroy them..."- well guess what, here we are again with another sustained rainfall deficit headning into mid-summer. I can't even get a 2nd cut of hay done, ground is powder-dry again.
  13. Now I'm curious, because 1938 was mentioned and I have a great deal of history/pictures from grandparents/uncles/aunts on the CT shoreline who lived through it- the only synoptic similarities I can find in writing are that particular hurricane coming north from the Bahamas with known high pressure to the east of the storm preventing recurve. The only synoptic map of the time I can find online is basically at landfall, not 5 days previous. I'm not so much curious about parallels between Erika and 1938, but if anyone has any synoptic maps for any time leading up to when it was of the Carolinas, I'd appreciate it. And as far as Erika goes, I'm curious about how the orientation of that evolving TN Valley-aligned ridge could affect the ultimate movement from the Carolina coast. Possible for a weakness to form to the Northeast and the Cape gets some surf going into Labor Day weekend as Erika escapes that way? Or hard east turn without picking up any latitude? EDIT: Nevermind, found this: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/imgdocmaps/daily_weather_maps.html
  14. A foot at its thickest that could see. But you get bergs piled up at high tide, then snow/precip may load on them and coagulate. There's definitely a full foot of snowpack right to the water's edge, that's anomolous all by itself. I haven't checked the mid-sound buoy lately. That thing must be encrusted.