Jump to content

Historic Severe Weather for the TN Valley


 Share

Recommended Posts

If there can be one for snow and ice, let's do one for severe too. 

4/27/2011 the only time I've ever been scared of severe storms 

https://twitter.com/NWSGSP/status/989873085330477057

Added another map since some of the paths were hard to see. Feel like this one gives a better idea of the size of the outbreak and this is only from one day!

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That image in the link is quite interesting to me. The EF3 through N GA confirms the headline, but other than the one near White Top in VA, the rest seem to follow river valleys, the overall flow of the Eastern Valley in general, or there seems to be some enhancement from the edge of the higher mountains on the TN/ NC border.  

I saw the damage on the road to Cade's Cove, so am certain terrain isn't necessarily a barrier to tornadoes, but overall, it still looks like terrain plays a big role.

Another thought though: maybe more tornadoes in mountainous areas with few to no reports.  They do indeed happen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNiA4DhUCLk/. 

Other than that, it looks to me like the angle of attack was just perfect for that outbreak 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually just remembered another outbreak, but from a LLOOONNNGGGG time ago: 

My mother's side of the family is from "the Wildcat" (somewhere near High Knob I think) and my grandfather was a principle in a local school.  I'm not sure if he was in any school at the time (wouldn't have been principle yet but high school age or thereabouts) but he would have been old enough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1929_Rye_Cove_tornado_outbreak 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

April 27, 2011 did more damage to our power system than any other weather event in history. Interesting/shocking part is usually ice storms fill the top 5 spots. It was ice storms, until 4/27/11. 

Some of those storm motions are just typical SW to NE. Personally I believe the NW to SE river valleys have more effect, acting like a funnel for the inflow from the SE. Canadian River west of OKC/Moore?

Here if one can get up on a ridge with a road SW to NE, and cleared trees for agriculture, it can work out. Sand Mountain is actually somewhat chasable, believe it or not.

We also have questions about stretching vorticity, spinning up, going over mountains. Personally I think it all evens out. Mountains neither protect or enhance, overall. SE facing river valleys, though, I'm open to that theory...

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...