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Hurricane Staal

Math/physics skills for meteorology?

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I will soon attend Boston University as a mathematics major and a physics minor. However, my goal is to pursue a graduate degree in atmospheric science.

 

What math and physics skills are helpful to prepare for said degree? (Note: BU offers several environmental/atmospheric science classes, so I could and should take them.)

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Here's the required math+physics for a met undergrad/grad degree (in most schools, anyway)

Math:

Calculus I, II, III

Ordinary Differential Equations

Physics:

Physics I, II, III

Physics I lab

Some of the more optional stuff:

Linear Algebra

Partial Differential Equations

Statistics I

Physics IV (waves)

Course names differ from school to school, so what is listed isn't necessarily what your courses will be called.

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Do you think that a physics major is sufficient to pursue an Atmospheric Science masters? Or a mathematics bachelors?

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I've seen a handful of physics/math undergrads do fine in a weather grad program. Most of the weather classes are calculus-based, anyway.

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I've seen a handful of physics/math undergrads do fine in a weather grad program. Most of the weather classes are calculus-based, anyway.

That's what I suspected. I know calc factors more into the work than the physics. It's more applied calculus.

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Here's the required math+physics for a met undergrad/grad degree (in most schools, anyway)

Math:

Calculus I, II, III

Ordinary Differential Equations

Physics:

Physics I, II, III

Physics I lab

Some of the more optional stuff:

Linear Algebra

Partial Differential Equations

Statistics I

Physics IV (waves)

Course names differ from school to school, so what is listed isn't necessarily what your courses will be called.

 

Thank you very much! I know that meteorologists should know some programming, so which course below sounds better?

 

Introduction to Computer Science 1: The first course for computer science majors and anyone seeking a rigorous introduction. Develops computational problem-solving skills by programming in the Python language, and exposes students to variety of other topics from computer science and its applications.

 

Introduction to Computational Physics: Undergraduate-level introduction to computer programming and methods used to formulate and solve physics problems on the computer. Also touches on more advanced topics such as parallel computing and graphical visualization.

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I heard somewhere meteorologists learn the basics using Python? I know there are courses free online that teach Python.

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Python is a very easy language to pick up. Is this your first time programming? 

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For my degree, I did actually decide that knowning programing was going to be a useful skill. I almost completed a Minor in Computer Science (as defined by the Comp Sci dept). I ended up getting an Area of Concentration on Comp Sci as defined by the Meteorology dept, though.

 

 

I heard somewhere meteorologists learn the basics using Python? I know there are courses free online that teach Python.

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I myself didn't experience it but it makes sense. Java was the thing when I was in college (Python wasn't a big deal yet). Python is a much easier language to begin in that Java was.

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I myself didn't experience it but it makes sense. Java was the thing when I was in college (Python wasn't a big deal yet). Python is a much easier language to begin in that Java was.

Agreed, Python is far more approachable than Java. 

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