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ct_yankee

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About ct_yankee

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    New Haven, CT

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  1. ct_yankee

    Nov 15/16 First Weenie Obs

    And... We're back to just normal cold-looking heavy snow in HVN... Every extra hour we get as pure snow is gonna count for quite a bit with this one. Winning event so far, for sure.
  2. ct_yankee

    Nov 15/16 First Weenie Obs

    Incoming taint on radar... Sometimes the cold can fight it off, but... Current snow here in New Haven now has that heavy, almost-looks-like-rain appearance that usually indicates imminent changeover. So enjoy the thumpity while it lasts, at least on the coast.
  3. ct_yankee

    Nov 15/16 First Weenie Obs

    Yeah, started as icy pingers here in New Haven but pretty quickly wetbulbed to all snow, which is now accumulating at a rather astonishing rate. Thinking those higher numbers from Upton could well verify if this keeps up for even a few more hours... The real deal, so far, and radar looking good.
  4. Well, I was in fact aware of the potential today, albeit (I thought) really low probability... But I was totally unaware Upton radar was down and showing old imagery. Kept checking radar and seeing nothing... Finally caught on and looked at BOX, and was totally astounded. By that point the event was practically over with. Absolutely crazy day.
  5. ct_yankee

    Michael Banter Thread

    Agreed, absolutely, and that's pretty much why I don't chase hurricanes, not unless they come right to me. But that's just me, others feel differently. For some, hurricanes are their one true passion, and chasing tornadoes might just be something to do during the off-season. I've known chasers like that. And of course some (like Josh, I believe) don't bother with tornadoes at all.
  6. ct_yankee

    Michael Banter Thread

    Except Tim's death and the various other stormchaser casualties haven't really changed the way people chase. When you chase a tornado, death is a possibility, every serious chaser knows this and always has known it. It's an inherently hazardous undertaking, not unlike, say, mountain climbing or sky diving. Someday a hurricane is probably going to kill a chaser, who can doubt it? But they take the risk knowingly, and if that's what they want to do, who are we to say it's wrong? We can debate ethics all day long, but it's never going to stop people from chasing, any more than Tim Samaras's death did. Any death is a tragedy, of course, but I know of no one who quit tornado chasing after El Reno. Disclosure, FWIW: I do enjoy chasing storms myself.
  7. ct_yankee

    Major Hurricane Michael

    Best looking eye yet:
  8. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    Yes, the razor's edge difference. Why does one day fizzle, and another go crazy? That is the key question. It often seems to me that shear doesn't behave as a linear continuum, but rather as a threshold, beyond which you get supercells and rotation, with nothing much happening until that threshold is reached. I've seen countless days out on the Plains where storms will go up and strengthen for hours without showing any signs of rotation, and then bam, suddenly every storm along the dryline will begin to spin and form a strong low-level meso, as if a switch was flipped... But it's almost as if we're not quite measuring the right things, because helicity values and the other parameters we look at don't seem to me to be able to predict exactly when and where that changeover to a supercellular regime occurs. Perhaps it's just that the numbers we look at via mesoanalysis and modeling aren't really reflecting the true state of the atmosphere, I don't know... But we're missing something, or we wouldn't keep getting surprised by these events. Not that Tuesday was a surprise, the SPC and others pretty much nailed it, but you know what I mean... Why was this event nailed, when so many others that looked pretty similar did not perform as expected?
  9. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    So... That supercell yesterday produced something like 4 tornadoes from just over the NY state line on out to Long Island, including one that tracked from New Canaan to Norwalk... And nobody comments? Yeah, I get it that some people just want to move on to winter, but damn... I expected a little more excitement.
  10. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    Yep, very impressive cell. Hook wrapped all the way round, forming a doughnut-hole BWER for at least one scan. Still a strong storm, which might cycle again, but it's out in the Sound now, and it's getting dark...
  11. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    This was always an iffy setup, that could have gone either way. The potential was there, but... The lack of a watch reflects the SPC's understanding that the day would probably underperform. I would expect a downgrade of the Slight with the next outlook issued.
  12. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    Based on radar trends, I'm doubtful we'll see a watch - actually, make that I'm almost certain we won't. I'm not seeing anything much that impresses, and the trend this late in the day can only go downward with loss of insolation... This time of year, if it hasn't happened by 6pm, it's not happening.
  13. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    Yeah, those are a bit more interesting than the rest, semi-discrete and definitely supercellular looking... Heading this way, too.
  14. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    Kinda surprised SPC actually put out an MD for our area, usually they ignore these low but definitely not zero risk situations. LOL 5% watch probability: Areas affected...Portions of NJ into Long Island and southern Connecticut Concerning...Severe potential...Watch unlikely Valid 252138Z - 252345Z Probability of Watch Issuance...5 percent SUMMARY...Occasionally weakly rotating storms are expected over the next few hours. Overall severe threat is very low. DISCUSSION...Semi-discrete storms, currently anchored along a warm front, have occasionally showed transient, weak low to mid-level rotation across portions of central/eastern New Jersey into the NYC area and far southern Connecticut. Though lapse rates are quite poor throughout the troposphere (i.e 5-5.5 C/km), sfc-850 mb moisture is quite deep, contributing to MLCAPE of up to 1000 J/kg along/south of the front. While effective bulk shear values are rather modest given the marginally unstable atmosphere (30-40 knots across the discussion area), favorable low-level directional shear remains in place, with effective SRH values exceeding 250 m2/s2 over Long Island, with nearly 350 m2/s2 0-3km SRH noted by recent KOKX WSR-88D VWP data. Low-level flow is slightly more veered closer to PHL, with latest KDIX VWP data suggesting both 0-3km and 0-1km SRH exceeding 150 m2/s2. The favorable low-level shear, combined with the moist/marginally buoyant airmass, may promote semi-discrete storms in the area to continue weakly rotating on an occasional basis, particularly across portions of Long Island and southern Connnecticut, where storms may more favorably traverse the warm front and ingest available low-level streamwise vorticity. Still, given the marginally buoyant airmass and expected lackluster potential for stronger rotation, the severe threat appears quite low. ..Squitieri/Hart.. 09/25/2018
  15. ct_yankee

    General Severe Weather Discussion 2018

    SPC: On Day 4 (Friday 9-21) however, an initial upper trough is forecast to be advancing quickly eastward across the Great Lakes and later the Northeast U.S., and adjacent eastern Canada. This trough will be accompanied by a seasonably strong cold front, progged to shift across the Northeast and Ohio Valley and shift off the New England coast by the beginning of Day 5. While instability along the length of the front -- particularly across New England -- will likely remain limited, strong westerly/west-southwesterly flow through a deep tropospheric layer may support potential for gusty/damaging winds, with a frontal line of convection. Thus, a severe risk area is being included Day 4, from parts of the Midwest/Ohio Valley northeastward into New England.
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