5speed6

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Posts posted by 5speed6


  1. 2 minutes ago, wasnow215 said:

    I mentioned this on Twitter. How can this still be the forecast for rain?

    Yeah, I'm skeptical of the northern extent of those 8"-plus numbers, especially if the southern solutions verify. Seems like the whole swath should be canted more west. 

    Then again, NWS tends to lag the prevailing model guidance, so...

    • Like 1

  2. 5 minutes ago, biodhokie said:

    From experience, the road system of coastal South Carolina sucks, badly. If you're near Charleston you get I-26 which gives you 4 lanes if you're doing all lanes away from the coast, otherwise you're left to evacuate on US road systems which vary from 2-laners to 4-laners through towns. On top of that, most of the area is either densely populated (because coast) or poor so if you're organizing people to bus out, that takes time. Just food for thought as to probably why a large swath of SC is being told to evac.

    edit: and I agree that there's politics at play as well.

    Consider too the limitations imposed by the ICW. There a *ton* of bottlenecks when it comes to moving people to/from the coast quickly. It's arguably just as bad as getting people off the OBX, only there are more of them. 

    • Like 1

  3. Interesting piece from a perhaps unexpected source:

    Quote

    [GasBuddy] tells TechCrunch that it’s now seeing hundreds of gas stations across Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina without fuel. It says the hardest hit cities are Miami (30% of stations are out of gas), West Palm Beach (29%), Fort Myers-Naples (20%), Tampa (13%), and Orlando (9% are out.)

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/07/as-irma-nears-florida-governor-tells-residents-to-use-gas-buddy-expedia-google-maps-more/

     

    Consider that a lot of states were already experiencing fuel shortages thanks to Harvey's impact on U.S. refining capacity. 


  4. 4 minutes ago, donsutherland1 said:

    A large part of Miami would be inundated by a 10-foot storm surge.

    Here's a useful tool for those who are interested. One can click anywhere on the map to check the elevation.

    http://en-us.topographic-map.com/places/Miami-7034739/

    MiamiTopographicMap.jpg

    The interaction with the Bay could also be a significant factor in how/where surge becomes a major problem, all dependent on the final approach track, of course. 


  5. 1 hour ago, mitchnick said:

    I wimped out and am spending the night in Williamsburg (more accurately,  outside Wythe candy store), and will venture down to the obx tomorrow noonish. Should be over by the time I get there. Personally,  my fear about going down there tonight was a rogue tornado considering that the center will be headed over, or slightly to the west of, the beaches. 

    I rode out the leftovers from TS Alberto in a house between Duck and Corolla in 2006, but that tracked just a hair further west/north, IIRC.